Apply to Join
Oct 25, 2018

Report submission

Mother and baby at work
Mother and baby at work

Looking back 25 years.

 

Twenty five years ago healthcare in the remote areas of the Nepal Himalayas was very limited or non-existent. To reach a functioning health post or hospital may have involved a walk of many days and, with a debilitating illness or a family member to carry, this was impossible for many. Humla, the district the Nepal Trust chose to work in, is officially Nepal’s remotest and is referred to as the ‘Hidden Himalayas’. Access is only by light aircraft at great cost or a 10 day trek from the nearest road-head. It is little wonder that Humla has the worst child and maternal health records in Nepal.

 

In 1993 a young women from Humla – the first female from her community to achieve her School Leaving Certificate – approached two young British doctors and persuaded them to set up a health clinic in her village. The only suitable premises were in a small room in the local school. The doctors quickly realised this was not a suitable arrangement and approached the Nepal Trust to build a stand- alone clinic. This was agreed and a year later the Torpa clinic was operating and attracting patients from all over the district, sometimes from many days walk a way. In those days government clinics simply did not work and the local hospital in Simikot was little more than a glorified cattle shed. Our first health project was immensely successful and our first Trek2Build was born!

 

Since then the Trust has gone on to build 6 health posts and 3 birthing centres and we have contributed to improving the local hospital. One of our early nursing volunteers is remembered throughout the district with great affection by village people and some children have been named after her.

 

In 1996 a civil war erupted in Nepal and lasted for 10 years. The remoter western districts became hotbeds of Maoist resistance and central government had little influence or support outside the district centres. All government departments were removed for safety and most aid agencies had to leave. Those that remained were vetted by the Maoists and only allowed to continue working if considered to be genuinely supportive and produced what they had promised. The Nepal Trust was allowed to remain without too many problems and we continued our health post construction programme and expanded our health education training. Our very first health post at Torpa was trashed during this time but we went back later and rebuilt it.

 

We ran a number of health camps in Simikot during this period supported by Nepali and foreign professionals. These camps highlighted the desperate need for reliable medical healthcare in these remote regions. Hari Bahadur Shaji with his wife and young son trekked for 7 days to reach the health camp. Sadly his son died before they reached help, delayed by Maoist insurgents who controlled the entire district of Humla outside Simikot. Three of Hari’s four children had now died.

 

Six year old Rhita was carried in severe pain and discomfort on her father’s back from the village of Mailla a good six day walk to the health camp. She was diagnosed with a bladder problem that required an operation. Rhita was flown to Nepalganj and was successfully treated. It was her first sight of a motor car and her first flight in a plane! These are just a couple of examples of the need for a reliable healthcare service in the Hidden Himalayas. Although health and medical facilities have improved immensely since those days the difficulties of trying to operate in such a remote area with hardly any of the infrastructures we are accustomed to makes it difficult to reach help quickly. However, there is now clear evidence that general health is improving mainly through our health education programmes like Little Doctors and maternal health. Stomach and respiratory diseases have decreased significantly as basic personal health knowledge increases.

 

Our future 5 year plan, now going through final agreement with the government, includes the construction of 3 new health clinics/birthing centres in south Humla as per government approved design. We will continue to support our existing health/birthing centres and support our child health education programme (80 students per year) and maternal health education programme (150 women per year). All will be delivered through our local partner, Self Help Promotion Centre-Nepal (SHIP) in full collaboration with the Humla District Health Officer.

 

We continue to provide new opportunities through education and providing services. Our renewable energy programme expands and helps to provide new economic opportunities and cleaner and healthier homes and workplaces. Agricultural opportunities are developing rapidly as we demonstrate new methods and ideas. Tourism is expanding rapidly as the ‘Gateway to Mount Kailash’ attracts more and more tourists. Our tourism training and development support has produced dividends. We will continue to support school development and expansion where needed in the district.

 

This is a very brief summary of where we are today. Much has been achieved over 25 years but there is so much more to do. There is a light at the end of the tunnel as self- sufficiency draws closer but that is still some way off. We thank you for all your past and continued support. Please continue to help if you can and do tell your friends about us. I know the world seems to be full of disasters asking for your help and we all feel we must do something, but the remote corners like the Hidden Himalayas tend to get forgotten. There is a real need to save these beautiful but fragile parts of the world.

 

Namaste.

Photos:     

 

     

Photos

1. Mother and baby at work
2. ‘Jenet’ Lama
3 Nurse volunteer ‘Janet’ mentoring and training
4. Little Doctors receiving certificates
5 Torpa Health worker
6 Kermi Health Post with local committee.
I hope this works!
Regards
Tony Sharpe

 

'Jenet' Lama
'Jenet' Lama
Volunteer nurse 'Janet' training and mentoring.
Volunteer nurse 'Janet' training and mentoring.
Torpa Health worker
Torpa Health worker
Keri Health post and local committee.
Keri Health post and local committee.
Bringing home fodder for the cattle
Bringing home fodder for the cattle
Sep 24, 2018

Another new school.

Nepals Future
Nepals Future

Dear Friends and Supporters.

We all know how important a good education is for our children and their futures. The terrible earthquake of 2015 destroyed that hope for many and the repercussions continue. Temporary learning centres (TLC) were set up very quickly so children could continue with a basic education but replacement schools take a long time to go through all the necessary planning stages before they can even start. The Nepal Trust has been at the forefront of this process building new schools where there is a need. Unfortunately, the aftermath of the earthquake left many buildings in a 'useable' but precarious state and it is now evident that these buildings have to be replaced before there is a disaster.

One such school is at Kalika in Nawalparisi district. This is a particularly poor area where nearly 40% of the population are illiterate. The original school was built in 1984 with the support of a number of the local people who were concerned about the lack of education for their children. It was built mainly from wood and bamboo but served its purpose and opened up a new future for their children. In 2007 a new concrete and brick teaching block was added with the support of a foreign aid agency. The earthquake of 2015 created so much damage that the building is now unsafe and cannot be used. Almost back to square one!

In addition the demand for education has increased and the current school is too small. The school caters for 450 students; 230 girls and 220 boys, from nursery to grade 10. The Nepal Trust will construct a new safe school building with 8 classrooms, provide new furniture and build a new toilet/sanitation block.

The main aim of this particular programme is to aid the recovery of this earthquake affected area with a focus on child education. The long term aim is to promote social reconstruction, political stability and social cohesion by developing an improved and sustainable secondary education system that falls within the new Government policy. The programme also aims to reinstate and develop education provision in accordance with the United Nations Millenium Development Goals (MDGs) particularly those which focus on achieving global primary education and extreme poverty reduction.

The need caused by the devastating affect of that 2015 earthquake continues and will do so for some time yet. I know disasters happen somewhere in the world every year and it is easy to forget but there are always long-term repercussions to deal with. This is definitely the case in Nepal and it will need our help for a long time yet.

Thank you for all your help and support so far. I hope you will continue to help and share with your friends. Tell them that there is still a great need and by contributing they will be helping some of the poorest people on the planet.

Namaste. 

Blessing the new school
Blessing the new school
Kalika school under construction
Kalika school under construction
Ready to build
Ready to build
Education is so important
Education is so important
Aug 13, 2018

Government Approval.

Happy with her new solar panel.
Happy with her new solar panel.

Dear Friends and Supporters

Our team in Nepal have just arrived back from the field. They have been leading a government evaluation team to check out our proposals for a new 5 year plan. This is an essential part of the approval process that, unfortunately, takes time and slows down our work in the field. The good news is they were very happy with what they saw and we should expect to receive the closing letter from the Social Works Council (SWC) within the next 1 - 2 weeks.

We can now move ahead with the final development of our new and innovative Renewable Energy Service Centre (SC). Working in collaboration with our chosen NGO the Local Initiative Development Support Consultancy Agency (LIDS) we can now start equipment procurement and fitting out of the SC.

During the groups stay in Humla there was a micro-hydro power failure in one of the villages they stayed in. This was a project built in the early 90s by a bi-lateral agency and with a long history of problems. Previously repairs have not been carried out urgently due to cost and having to get engineers from Kathmandu or India. The SC project will hopefully solve this problem and ensure the smooth running of the many schemes in the district. It will also provide a blueprint for similar schemes in other remote areas of the Himalayas.

Thank you for all your patience and support for this fantastic project. Clean renewable energy has made remarkable improvements to the health and wellbeing of the local inhabitants of this remote part of the world. The SC will ensure a stronger and more reliable future and encourage further development. Please tell your friends about us and encourage their support. Perhaps you know of renewable energy companies that might want to help?

Namaste

Clean light.
Clean light.
A happy father and son.
A happy father and son.
The Renewable Energy Service Centre
The Renewable Energy Service Centre
Service Centre 3-phase wiring
Service Centre 3-phase wiring
 
WARNING: Javascript is currently disabled or is not available in your browser. GlobalGiving makes extensive use of Javascript and will not function properly with Javascript disabled. Please enable Javascript and refresh this page.