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Sep 5, 2017

Quick Update - Rebuilding of Training Facility

Dismantling the old Training Centre
Dismantling the old Training Centre

The local community were so moved by the loss of the training centre in Lailenpi that they have come out in force to help clear the land in preparation for rebuilding. 

The first wave of villagers supported dismantling of the old buildings and salvaging of key materials during June and July. Timber will be reused for furniture making, while the corrugated sheets were used to erect a temporary kitchen. 

With support from appeal funding raised in the UK, local masons were employed in Lailenpi to start the long process of preparing building materials from the local hillside.  Heavy machinery was hired in July and August to start terracing the land in lieu of laying foundations once further funding has been raised. 

This critical project supports the redevelopment of our training facility post destruction caused by Cyclone Mora.  The rebuilding project will see the construction of a cyclone-proof training centre, office and dormitory building which will support our ongoing projects in health, education and food security across western Chin State.

Dismantling the dormitory post cyclone Mora
Dismantling the dormitory post cyclone Mora
Site Clearance
Site Clearance
The incredible masons hard at work
The incredible masons hard at work
Results of the masons hard labour
Results of the masons hard labour
Terracing of the land almost complete
Terracing of the land almost complete
Jun 6, 2017

Stories of hope from our Traditional Birth Attendant training

Frances and Maaike in mid-training
Frances and Maaike in mid-training

“I never hoped or expected that I would have the opportunity to attend such professional training... Before, we didn’t even know how important it was to wash our hands! Now, the hardest and most difficult parts of childbirth have become simple and less stressful for me. I feel so much more confident.”  Hlau, Traditional Birth Attendant 

Frances and Maaike, our two specialist trainers from Birthlink UK, have just returned from Chin State, Burma, brimming with excitement about their fifth visit to Health and Hope’s training centre. They had spent eight days helping women in Chin State gain knowledge of the birthing process and increasing their skills in midwifery care.

Maaike reports: ”It was an arduous four day journey into the jungles of Chin State, but we do it gladly. Fifty-two Traditional Birth Attendants (TBAs) came for the training, some having walked for a whole week across the mountains to attend.

We were so pleased to see old faces again, with just over half of those in attendance returning for the second phase of training. I think one of the most rewarding things for me is to see the incredible change to traditional practices since our last visit. Mother to baby skin-on-skin contact following birth is now a universal practice. This helps to regulate breathing, maintain temperature, initiate feeding and protects the baby from infection. In the absence of medical support, TBAs now understand the mechanism of delivery of the placenta and are encouraging natural separation rather than pulling. This has radically reduced the incidence of haemorrhaging.

Hand washing and infection control are well understood. TBAs have been practising listening to the baby’s heartbeat during pregnancy and delivery, using the equipment that Health and Hope supplied.”

Mrs Lakhu, a pregnant women from Lailenpi, was examined by the team during their training. She was so grateful for the work of the TBAs: “Health and Hope’s work is a life-giver for women in our community. Before the TBAs were trained by Health and Hope, I had so many complicated deliveries. During my last pregnancy, I was very weak and thought that the baby was not healthy. I was so worried I nearly started walking to the nearest hospital which is four to five days journey. But the TBA reassured me from her training that the baby was healthy. She had learnt so much, that my last pregnancy was so smooth and she helped me give birth without any problems or bleeding. We named our daughter Grace and till today, she has been healthy. 

All of the women here in the village have come to realise how wonderful is the knowledge and training that comes from Health and Hope to our community. We appreciate the TBAs so much.”

Thanks to your support, these fifty-two TBAs have been equipped with life-saving skills to help women like Mrs Lakhu in villages across Chin State. In addition, each TBA left the training with a ‘birthing kit’ containing the essential equipment for supporting women through pregnancy and labour. The next step will be to issue TBAs with a clean delivery kit for each pregnant women that they assist. 

"There have been so many valuable changes in practice since our first visit. We have also seen an overwhelming increase in confidence in the returning TBAs who now proudly model best practice to their peers. We are so looking forward to returning to Chin State. We truly get back as much as we give out." Frances, Midwife, Birthlink UK

We are so grateful for your support to this project and for the impact it is having on the lives of many families across the region.

On behalf of all at Health and Hope: Thank you!

Practical sessions: assisting deliveries
Practical sessions: assisting deliveries
Reflective learning and monitoring cards
Reflective learning and monitoring cards
Practising new-born resuscitation
Practising new-born resuscitation
Taking blood pressure
Taking blood pressure
Birthing bag
Birthing bag
Mar 20, 2017

Quick update

Dr Sasa, Ma Thwin Hlaing & Mr Kyaw Naing (CHW)
Dr Sasa, Ma Thwin Hlaing & Mr Kyaw Naing (CHW)

Thank you so much for your support towards our project: Transforming Maternal and Child Health in Myanmar.  

We just wanted to write to share a short story that we received yesterday from Dr Sasa, Founder of Health and Hope's work. He is currently delivering training to Community Health Workers (CHWs) on the border of Chin and Rakhine state and met with a lady called Ma Thwin Hlaing who lives in a remote village. Pictured here with her first child, she told us about the day her daughter was born:

"My child's name is Sein and she is nine months old. The day she was born, the whole village was flooded. When I went into labour, the water was still rising. I remember it had reached my knee and all connection to other villages was cut off.  

As this was my first pregnancy I was so scared. I thought that I and my child were going to die. But at that time, our CHW came out of nowhere, arriving at our house by boat. It was so dangerous I couldn't believe it he had come.  

Still to this day, I have no idea how he found my home. He brought his boat right up to my bed where I was lying before helping deliver my child. That day he saved us both from dying.

Now I am just so happy. Look, my daughter is so healthy. It's unbelievable how we were saved."

Community Health Workers (CHWs) risk their lives in service of others and they couldn't do this without your support.

We've got two weeks to go in our fundraising campaign on Global Giving and are half-way there with raising the minimum amount of funds needed. If you would like to share our campaign with friends and family, do pass on the link to our web page: http://goto.gg/27216.

If you are on Facebook or Twitter, you can click here to share our page on social media.

Thank you so much for partnering with us,

Chris & Dr Sasa

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