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Nov 19, 2018

Project C.A.T. + WWF: Tiger Update

Staffan Widstrand / WWF
Staffan Widstrand / WWF

Dear Friend,

Once 100,000 strong, the world’s wild tiger population dipped to an estimated 3,200 tigers by 2010, as poaching, habitat loss, and conflict with humans threatened to erase this majestic cat from its historic range. WWF’s ambitious Tx2 campaign, to double the populations of tigers by 2022 is now half way through its timeline, and we are excited to share successes we’ve been able to achieve so far, in large part due to partnerships established with governments of tiger range countries. These are successes that individuals like you are helping to make possible.

Working with tiger range nations:

  • In hand with newly developed camera technologies, a new catch-and-release ecotourism site has been established by WWF and the government of Bhutan to benefit the legendary ‘golden mahseer’ fish, as well as tigers, by creating livelihood opportunities for people in the region. Managed sustainably, and monitored utilizing enhanced wildlife tracking technologies, the conservation-friendly site will protect stretches of habitats in and around Bhutan’s Royal Manas National Park.

Innovative collaborations and solutions:

  • On the World’s 8th World Tiger Day, celebrated every year on July 29 since 2010, WWF asked everyone to #connect2tigers, sharing true stories of real tigers in the wild – and asking supporters to share these stories too. From public rallies and street plays to drawing competitions and documentary screenings, among the tiger-range countries, celebrations sprang up in various forms tiger range nations around the world. 

Wildlife Technologies at Work:

  • Video/photographic studies from the first-ever joint tiger census between Nepal and India have confirmed that wild tigers are actively using ‘wildlife corridors’ with evidence that at least 11 tigers have used these corridors to re-colonize in Nepal
  • WWF biologists have photographed over 500 individual wild tigers, each identified by their unique stripes like a fingerprint, over 15% of the estimated 3,200 of tigers in the wild

Big News for Tiger Populations!

  • WWF and The Riau Natural Resources Conservation Agency (BKSDA) has introduced the world to Rima and her four new cubs and three teenagers born in 2005 captured on camera in a forest in Riau.
  • Nepal is on track to become the first of the world’s countries to double its wild tiger population since 2010. According to results from the country’s most recent tiger survey, there are now an estimated 235 wild tigers, nearly twice the number of tigers counted in 2009.

With a global population of as few as 3,890 wild tigers, every population increase, and collaborative milestone matters. In the face of tremendous threats to wild tigers’ survival, your support is helping to strengthen law enforcement, anti-poaching efforts and slow deforestation in tiger habitats—all lending to our goal of doubling the number of tigers in the wild by 2022. Your commitment makes a difference in our work and sets an inspiring example that together, change is possible. Thank you.

Links:

Jul 3, 2018

Project C.A.T. + WWF: Tiger Update

(c) Chris Hails / WWF
(c) Chris Hails / WWF

Once 100,000 strong, the world’s wild tiger population dipped to an estimated 3,200 tigers by 2010, as poaching, habitat loss, and conflict with humans threatened to erase this majestic cat from its historic range. WWF’s ambitious Tx2 campaign, to double the populations of tigers by 2022 is now half way through its timeline, and we are excited to share successes we’ve been able to achieve so far, in large part due to partnerships established with governments of tiger range countries. These are successes that individuals like you are helping to make possible.

 Working with tiger range nations:

  • Under the additional protection established earlier this year with Bhutan’s zero poaching strategy, the tiger population in the Royal Manas National Park has more than doubled. With a global population of as few as 3,890 wild tigers, every population increase matters. This is a big win for tiger conservation.
  • Great teamwork and transboundary collaboration with Indian counterparts in India’s Manas National Park, along with local communities, will help continue this trend.

 Innovative collaborations and solutions:

  • Borneo and Sumatra are two tiger range countries experiencing unsustainable palm oil production which is decimating the forest habitat. WWF has convened a Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil, a large, international group of palm oil producers, buyers, and environmental groups, to establish sustainable standards and certification processes. These industry standards will help to reduce further destruction of forests.

 Addressing climate change:

  • One of the world’s largest tiger populations is found in the Sundarbans – a large mangrove forest shared by India and Bangladesh on the northern coast of the Indian Ocean. However, rising sea levels due to climate change can wipe out these forests and the last remaining habitat of this tiger population. Forests are not only native habitat for tigers, but also protect the planet by absorbing carbon dioxide (CO2). WWF therefore works to mitigate climate change by working with governments to establish agreements reducing deforestation and by using satellite imagery and aerial mapping technologies to track illegal logging.

 In the face of tremendous threats to wild tigers’ survival, your support is helping to reverse the course for these majestic cats and secure a brighter future for tigers and the many other species that share their habitat. Your commitment makes a difference in our work and sets an inspiring example that together, change is possible. Thank you.

(c) Martin Harvey / WWF
(c) Martin Harvey / WWF

Links:

Feb 13, 2018

Project C.A.T. + WWF: Tiger Update

Emmanuel Rondeau / WWF-UK
Emmanuel Rondeau / WWF-UK

Once 100,000 strong, the world’s wild tiger population dipped to an estimated 3,200 tigers by 2010, as poaching, habitat loss, and conflict with humans threatened to erase this majestic cat from its historic range. WWF is proud to be working with government and organizational partners to double the tiger population by 2022. While this is a long-term project, we have successes along the way that serve as important milestones of progress – successes that we’d like to share with individuals like you who are helping to make it possible.

Working with tiger range nations:

  • In September, Kazakhstan announced plans to reintroduce tigers
  • In March, Bhutan announced its national zero poaching strategy

Ending poaching and the tiger trade:

  • More than 100 sites across Asia are now using technology to monitor poaching and wildlife crime

Strengthening support for rangers:

  • The ground-breaking Training Guidelines for Anti-Poaching Field Rangers released in 2016 have been widely circulated and now translated into Hindi, French, Chinese, Arabic, and Spanish

Monitoring tiger populations:

  • Camera traps in Thailand indicate that adult female tiger numbers are increasing by 25 percent per year on average, and cub numbers have doubled since the last survey.

In the face of tremendous threats to wild tigers’ survival, your support is helping to reverse the course for these majestic cats and secure a brighter future for tigers and the many other species that share their habitat. Your commitment makes a difference in our work and sets an inspiring example that together, change is possible.

Thank you.

Ola Jennersten / WWF-Sweden
Ola Jennersten / WWF-Sweden

Links:

 
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