Apply to Join

Support WWF's Response to Australia's Wildfires

by World Wildlife Fund Inc
Support WWF's Response to Australia's Wildfires
Support WWF's Response to Australia's Wildfires
Support WWF's Response to Australia's Wildfires
Support WWF's Response to Australia's Wildfires
Support WWF's Response to Australia's Wildfires
Support WWF's Response to Australia's Wildfires
Support WWF's Response to Australia's Wildfires
Support WWF's Response to Australia's Wildfires

Summary

Please support WWF's response to Australia's devastating bushfires. As of January 6, these massive fires have burned more than 20.7 million acres-an area bigger than the Brazilian Amazon and Californian fires combined. Dozens of people-including several volunteer firefighters-have died. Estimates suggest that more than 1 billion animals may have been killed from the fires. Your donation will support WWF's immediate response, animal care/rehab, and longer-term restoration and reforestation.

$1M
total goal
$984,569
remaining
50
donors
0
monthly donors
13
days

Challenge

It is a crisis with epic implications for Australia's wildlife and wild places too, as massive areas of bushland, forests, and parks have been scorched. Australia is filled with species found nowhere else in the world: koalas, kangaroos, wallabies, and kookaburras. The fires have laid waste to vast stretches of earth, leaving such animals killed or injured. Until the fires subside, the full extent of damage will remain unknown, but experts are predicting the death of billions of animals.

Solution

Your donation will support efforts to: Address immediate needs, including providing extensive care to injured koalas and other species; Recover critical habitats by planting 10,000 trees in critical koala habitat; and Improve bushfire response by working to green the government's reconstruction responses to this and future fires through the best science on climate resilience.

Long-Term Impact

Without help, critical habitat and beloved species may not survive. Many forests will take decades to recover. Even eucalyptus trees, which have evolved to survive bushres, are dying under the extreme heat. In some places, it's hard to imagine recovery. For example, the damage on fire-ravaged Kangaroo Island may have pushed some native species over the brink. More than 50% of the island's koala population perished.

Additional Documentation

This project has provided additional documentation in a PDF file (projdoc.pdf).

Resources

http:/​/​www.worldwildlife.org/​
https:/​/​www.worldwildlife.org/​stories/​australia-s

Organization Information

World Wildlife Fund Inc

Location: Washington, DC - USA
Website:
Facebook: Facebook Page
Twitter: @world_wildlife
Project Leader:
Cheron Carlson
Washington, DC United States

Learn more about GlobalGiving

Teenage Science Students
Vetting +
Due Diligence

Snorkeler
Our
Impact

Woman Holding a Gift Card
Give
Gift Cards

Young Girl with a Bicycle
GlobalGiving
Guarantee

Sign up for the GlobalGiving Newsletter

WARNING: Javascript is currently disabled or is not available in your browser. GlobalGiving makes extensive use of Javascript and will not function properly with Javascript disabled. Please enable Javascript and refresh this page.