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Jan 8, 2020

Project C.A.T. + WWF: Tiger Update

naturepl.com / Andy Rouse / WWF
naturepl.com / Andy Rouse / WWF

As we enter a new decade and prepare to face the challenges that lie ahead, we’d like to take a moment to share a couple stories of champions hard at work during 2019 to help protect tigers.

Nepal

Citizen Scientist Chhabi Magar walks through western Nepal’s Gauri Mahila Community Forest, reminiscing about a time only 10 years ago when this area was treeless, and the only place he’d see tigers was on rupee notes. But now, thanks to community reforestation projects, the forest is abundant—and thanks to the work Magar is doing, his dreams of seeing real wild tigers are coming true. For the past two years, Magar has been serving as a local citizen scientist, setting up and maintaining camera traps in the forest close to where he lives in order to monitor tigers’ movements. By capturing these images of the big cats in their natural habitat, scientists can get a much clearer sense of how tiger populations in the forest are faring, providing valuable insight into how to best protect them. Happily, the results of Magar’s camera trap data are contributing to some very uplifting news. Eleven years ago, only 18 tigers were counted in this region. Today, there are 87.

Myanmar

In a village tucked deep in the Dawna Tenasserim forests of Myanmar, Hey Mer, a rubber farmer, made a choice. She wouldn’t follow the example of so many who had been destroying her country’s fragile forests to create rubber farms. Instead, she decided to take a WWF-led workshop on sustainable rubber farming and production. She learned how to plant in ways that would conserve the forest and allow her to create the kind of sustainably grown rubber that’s typically in high demand with international buyers. She applied what she’d learned, and soon word spread about the high-quality product she was producing. Neighboring villagers began visiting, asking her to teach them how to do what she was doing. Today, Hey Mer has become known as a leader in her village, nurturing enthusiasm for sustainable farming and dispersing seeds of knowledge she hopes will help her entire region reap better income for all while protecting their precious forests for future generations – and for tiger survival.

The world’s first Global Platform for Sustainable Natural Rubber aims to transform the global rubber industry through standards for sustainable rubber that protect forests, biodiversity, and human rights, while improving the livelihoods of small-scale farmers.

Looming challenges:

  • While the global tiger numbers have increased for the first time in more than a century due to great effort and focus by countries like Nepal, Bhutan, India, and Russia, tiger conservation remains a challenge in Southeast Asia, where rampant poaching, demand for tiger parts, and deforestation are an ever-present threat.
  • Illegal wildlife trade remains a severe threat to tigers. WWF prioritizes our work to ensure Asian tiger farms are closed, and works through public outreach, international policy forums, and on-the-ground with our country offices in China, Vietnam, Laos and Thailand to ensure those governments commit to complete bans on tiger trade, and a rapid shut down and phase out of their tiger farms.

Innovative collaborations and solutions:

  • WWF prioritizes our work to ensure Asian tiger farms are closed, and works through public outreach, international policy forums, and on-the-ground with our country offices in China, Vietnam, Laos and Thailand to ensure those governments commit to complete bans on tiger trade, and a rapid shut down and phase out of their tiger farms.

  • In just over a year since its start, the Coalition to End Wildlife Trafficking Online has become the leading wildlife crime and tech industry partnership, with 34 of the world’s top tech companies working together to stop wildlife trafficking online. The coalition brings together companies from across the world in partnership with wildlife experts at WWF, TRAFFIC, and IFAW for an industry-wide approach to reduce wildlife trafficking online by 80% by 2020.

What you can do to help:

  • Your continued support means the world to tiger survival.  Please share our project with your colleagues, friends and family.

  • Watch Discovery's documentary, Tigerland, which aired this past March. The documentary covers generations of tiger conservation efforts from India to Far East Russia, and the brave champions leading the efforts.

With a global population of as few as 3,890 wild tigers, every population increase, and collaborative milestone matters. In the face of tremendous threats to wild tigers’ survival, your support is helping to strengthen law enforcement, anti-poaching efforts and slow deforestation in tiger habitats—all lending to our goal of doubling the number of tigers in the wild by 2022. Your commitment makes a difference in our work and sets an inspiring example that together, change is possible. Thank you.

naturepl.com / Yashpal Rathore / WWF
naturepl.com / Yashpal Rathore / WWF

Links:

Jul 30, 2019

Project C.A.T. + WWF: Tiger Update

Dear Friend,

In honor of Global Tiger Day – July 29, 2019 – we are thrilled to share some great news. The government of India announced today the results of the most comprehensive wildlife survey to date, updating the current estimated population at 2,967 tigers up from 2,226 in 2015. India continues to lead the way in tiger recovery and has the largest wild tiger population of any country – nearly 2/3 of all tigers worldwide.

At a time when the future of wild tigers is under threat, every tiger counts. The updated India tiger population estimate suggests that numerous populations within the country may be stable or growing. The 2018 surveys were unparalleled in their extent, and provide comprehensive coverage of tiger habitats in India: 381,400 km2 of forested habitats in 20 tiger occupied states of India:

  • 317,958 habitat plot samplings
  • 522,996 km surveyed by foot
  • camera traps deployed at 26,838 locations
  • 34,858,623 images of wildlife of which 76,651 were tigers and 51,777 were leopards

The persistence of wild tigers can be attributed to enhanced protection, tiger prey management, habitat management, participation of local communities in tiger conservation, and political will. In the second most populous nation, the commitment to making room for tigers is a testament to the government’s strong role in championing the conservation efforts, and gives hope for the future of tigers in other regions.

Looming challenges:

  • While the global tiger numbers have increased for the first time in more than a century due to great effort and focus by countries like Nepal, Bhutan, India, and Russia, tiger conservation remains a challenge in Southeast Asia, where rampant poaching, demand for tiger parts, and deforestation are an ever-present threat.
  • Habitat loss and encroachment, particularly with the growth of infrastructure, is a growing challenge, and also leads to human-wildlife conflict. As we plan for tiger population growth, human-tiger conflict will only increase as tigers disperse through human-dominated landscapes in search of territory.
  • A rapid assessment of site-based tiger conservation areas across Asia that found that only 13% of the areas reviewed met global standards, and at least one-third were at serious risk of losing their tigers due to lack of anti-poaching resources.

Innovative collaborations and solutions:

  • WWF will be prioritizing our work to ensure Asian tiger farms are closed, and will be working through public outreach, international policy forums, and on-the-ground with our country offices in China, Vietnam, Laos and Thailand to ensure those governments commit to complete bans on tiger trade, and a rapid shut down and phase out of their tiger farms.
  • To address illegal tiger trade, the Coalition to End Wildlife Trafficking Online - the first coalition of its kind bringing together corporate partners in the technology sector - was established to identify innovative ways to identify and halt online sales of tiger products.
  • WWF is managing human-tiger conflict with the SAFE Systems approach, which utilizes a holistic strategy to address conflict through comprehensive assessments and uses key tools of conflict management, such as policy, prevention, mitigation, understanding conflict, response, and monitoring, and balances the safety of people, assets, wildlife, and habitat. This approach enables the assessment of each context-specific human-wildlife conflict situation in a given landscape, region or village to enable development of a strategy and provide support to local communities to implement locally-appropriate solutions on the ground.

What you can do to help:

  • Your continued support means the world to tiger survival.  Please share our project with your colleagues, friends and family.
  • Watch Discovery's documentary, Tigerland, which aired this past March. The documentary covers generations of tiger conservation efforts from India to Far East Russia, and the brave champions leading the efforts.

With a global population of as few as 3,890 wild tigers, every population increase, and collaborative milestone matters. In the face of tremendous threats to wild tigers’ survival, your support is helping to strengthen law enforcement, anti-poaching efforts and slow deforestation in tiger habitats—all lending to our goal of doubling the number of tigers in the wild by 2022. Your commitment makes a difference in our work and sets an inspiring example that together, change is possible. Thank you.

Links:

Mar 29, 2019

Project C.A.T. + WWF: Tiger Update

Dear Friend,

Once 100,000 strong, the world’s wild tiger population dipped to an estimated 3,200 tigers by 2010, as poaching, habitat loss, and conflict with humans threatened to erase this majestic cat from its historic range. WWF’s ambitious Tx2 campaign, to double the populations of tigers by 2022 is now half way through its timeline, and we are excited to share successes we’ve been able to achieve so far, in large part due to partnerships established with governments of tiger range countries. These are successes that individuals like you are helping to make possible.

Working with tiger range nations:

  • Earlier this year, China announced the creation of a Northeast Tiger and Leopard National Park - 60 percent larger than Yellowstone National Park - creating a refuge for the imperiled Siberian tiger.
  • Russia maintained its ban on commercial logging of the Korean Pine Forests (overturning an earlier lift of the ban), protecting a key habitat for Amur tigers.
  • In January, Bhutan announced that the tiger population in Royal Manas National Park doubled.


Looming challenges:

  • While the global tiger numbers have increased for the first time in more than a century due to great effort and focus by countries like Nepal, Bhutan, India, and Russia, tiger conservation remains a challenge in Southeast Asia, where rampant poaching, demand for tiger parts, and deforestation are an ever-present threat.
  • Habitat loss and encroachment, particularly with the growth of infrastructure, is a growing challenge, and also leads to human-wildlife conflict. As we plan for tiger population growth, human-tiger conflict will only increase as tigers disperse through human-dominated landscapes in search of territory.
  • A rapid assessment of site-based tiger conservation areas across Asia that found that only 13% of the areas reviewed met global standards, and at least one-third were at serious risk of losing their tigers due to lack of anti-poaching resources.

 

Innovative collaborations and solutions:

  • WWF will be prioritizing our work to ensure Asian tiger farms are closed, and will be working through public outreach, international policy forums, and on-the-ground with our country offices in China, Vietnam, Laos and Thailand to ensure those governments commit to complete bans on tiger trade, and a rapid shut down and phase out of their tiger farms.
  • To address illegal tiger trade, the Coalition to End Wildlife Traficking Online - the first coalition of its kind bringing together corporate partners in the technology sector - was established to identify innovative ways to identify and halt online sales of tiger products.
  • WWF is managing human-tiger conflict with the SAFE Systems approach, which utilizes a holistic strategy to address conflict through comprehensive assessments and uses key tools of conflict management, such as policy, prevention, mitigation, understanding conflict, response, and monitoring, and balances the safety of people, assets, wildlife, and habitat. This approach enables the assessment of each context-specific human-wildlife conflict situation in a given landscape, region or village to enable development of a strategy and provide support to local communities to implement locally-appropriate solutions on the ground.

 

What you can do to help:

  • Your continued support means the world to tiger survival.  Please share our project with your colleagues, friends and family.
  • Watch Discovery's documentary, Tigerland, airing Saturday, March 30th. The documentary covers generations of tiger conservation efforts from India to Far East Russia, and the brave champions leading the efforts.


With a global population of as few as 3,890 wild tigers, every population increase, and collaborative milestone matters. In the face of tremendous threats to wild tigers’ survival, your support is helping to strengthen law enforcement, anti-poaching efforts and slow deforestation in tiger habitats—all lending to our goal of doubling the number of tigers in the wild by 2022. Your commitment makes a difference in our work and sets an inspiring example that together, change is possible. Thank you.

Links:

 
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