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Oct 3, 2019

Update--Help Families Fleeing Crisis Rebuild

Every day refugee families face unspeakable circumstances. They're forced to flee violence in Syria with their toddlers in their arms, have little food to eat or water to drink in drought-stricken Somalia, are stranded in Greece in dangerous living conditions...

The reality of President Trump's decision to slash the number of refugees allowed into the U.S. next year by nearly half impacts so many refugee families who are already facing dire situations.

America has always been a beacon of hope for those in need — a true global leader in response to the refugee crisis. It’s unconscionable that this administration has turned its back on the most vulnerable among us. But I assure you, my colleagues and I will never stop working to help as many refugees as possible. And we need you with us in the months to come.

You can help us support stranded families now. We aid refugees around the world and help refugees who are resettled here in the U.S. Help us provide them with trauma counseling, health care, emergency aid, water and sanitation and other critical assistance by donating today.

Thanks for continuing to stand with refugees

Sep 26, 2019

Update--Support Refugee Children

More than 62 million children and youth without access to school suffer in conflict settings around the world.


Yet, year after year, the international community fails to provide adequate support for them. Parents and children often rank schooling as a top priority, but programs that protect children and provide education receive less than 2% of humanitarian funding.


Too often it can take more than six months for the IRC to receive support from governmental funders at the start of an emergency. This delay prevents skilled humanitarian specialists from reaching children with responsive programs when they are most vulnerable in the first months of displacement. While underfunding in long-term programming prevents children from receiving continuous access to education when it is most important for their future.


This global funding shortfall leaves uprooted children and youth at-risk to prolonged psychological and physical abuse, abduction, recruitment into armed forces, and developmental stagnation. The consequences of underestimating the importance of programs that educate and protect children can prove dire.


As the average length of displacement for refugees and other uprooted people has stretched to 20 years, failing to invest in education in crisis settings may result in an entire lost generation of children.

At the IRC, we not only envision a world where the most vulnerable survivors of crises are protected: for more than 80 years we have designed, delivered and developed evidence-based programs that empower children and youth to develop to their full potential. Today, the IRC serves more than 1.6 million children across more than 30 countries, and in doing so, helps prepare them as future leaders in their communities and countries.

Backed by our legacy of expertise in providing high-quality programming, we want to raise the bar globally in delivering faster, better care and education for more children impacted by crisis.


There has never been a more important moment to prioritize this goal: Today, at least 68 million people have been displaced by war and disaster—a global record. More than half of those displaced are children.

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Sep 4, 2019

Update--Help Families Fleeing Crisis Rebuild

The United States’ proposed departure from the Flores Settlement, a landmark 1997 agreement which established minimum standards for the care, custody, and release of all children in immigration detention, is not something the IRC will stand for.

The Flores Settlement Agreement was reached following over a decade of litigation brought by children from Central America against the U.S. government in response to their prolonged detention and mistreatment in federal custody in the 1980s.

Jenn Piatt, Senior Director, Refugee Resettlement and Asylum Policy and Advocacy at the International Rescue Committee:

“At a time when the administration has argued children do not even deserve a toothbrush, it seeks to undermine the minimum protections in Flores. A departure from Flores will only exacerbate the dangerous conditions in detention centers revealed recently by the HHS Inspector General, further subject children to inhumane treatment, and possibly subject children to indefinite detention. Seeking asylum is legal, and nobody – least of all children – should be punished for doing so.

“The administration needs a history lesson. Flores was put into place because the government routinely demonstrated that it was incapable of treating children in civil immigration detention even remotely well. For decades in America, immigrant children were subjected to prolonged detention with unrelated adults and criminal offenders, simply for seeking safety. Further, these children were subject to sexually-invasive strip searches, denied basic food and water, and had inadequate access to educational services – all while languishing in detention for years in many cases.

“This rule does not uphold the spirit of Flores and should be swiftly challenged. Based on comments by DHS this morning, it appears the administration already knows this and instead of working to improve conditions for children, the administration seeks to move ahead with policies that are legally insufficient and would not protect children.”

We are at the border right now providing emergency aid to asylum seekers 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. You can help us provide food, water, access to medical assistance and legal counseling, clothing and emergency shelter. Your gift will also support our work at the root of the crisis in Central America, where many asylum-seekers have fled, and in more than 40 countries around the world.

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