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Sep 4, 2019

Update--Help Families Fleeing Crisis Rebuild

The United States’ proposed departure from the Flores Settlement, a landmark 1997 agreement which established minimum standards for the care, custody, and release of all children in immigration detention, is not something the IRC will stand for.

The Flores Settlement Agreement was reached following over a decade of litigation brought by children from Central America against the U.S. government in response to their prolonged detention and mistreatment in federal custody in the 1980s.

Jenn Piatt, Senior Director, Refugee Resettlement and Asylum Policy and Advocacy at the International Rescue Committee:

“At a time when the administration has argued children do not even deserve a toothbrush, it seeks to undermine the minimum protections in Flores. A departure from Flores will only exacerbate the dangerous conditions in detention centers revealed recently by the HHS Inspector General, further subject children to inhumane treatment, and possibly subject children to indefinite detention. Seeking asylum is legal, and nobody – least of all children – should be punished for doing so.

“The administration needs a history lesson. Flores was put into place because the government routinely demonstrated that it was incapable of treating children in civil immigration detention even remotely well. For decades in America, immigrant children were subjected to prolonged detention with unrelated adults and criminal offenders, simply for seeking safety. Further, these children were subject to sexually-invasive strip searches, denied basic food and water, and had inadequate access to educational services – all while languishing in detention for years in many cases.

“This rule does not uphold the spirit of Flores and should be swiftly challenged. Based on comments by DHS this morning, it appears the administration already knows this and instead of working to improve conditions for children, the administration seeks to move ahead with policies that are legally insufficient and would not protect children.”

We are at the border right now providing emergency aid to asylum seekers 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. You can help us provide food, water, access to medical assistance and legal counseling, clothing and emergency shelter. Your gift will also support our work at the root of the crisis in Central America, where many asylum-seekers have fled, and in more than 40 countries around the world.

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Aug 6, 2019

Update--Help Refugees at Risk in the U.S.

When families or separated children are released from detention, they need immediate assistance and resources to arrive to their destination, address basic needs, and receive critical referrals for social and legal services. IRC’s response offers a range of emergency services including needs assessment, temporary shelter, and transportation assistance, emergency medical services, access to phones and computers, food and cash assistance, referrals for services in destination location, know your rights and basic guidance, and mental health screenings.

For nearly five years, the IRC has worked with unaccompanied children from Central America seeking asylum in the United States. Prior to the new policy, unaccompanied children were not forcibly separated from their parents, but rather had come to the U.S. to seek protection on their own, often with the intention of reuniting with other family members residing in the U.S. Many of these unaccompanied children who had traveled alone were older children or teens.

Now, the population of unaccompanied children in U.S. custody includes thousands of children, including many babies and toddlers, who were taken from their parents at the border.

The IRC oversees post-release services for unaccompanied children, which includes:

  • connecting them to legal providers to help with their asylum claim;
  • providing unaccompanied children and sponsors basic orientation on their rights before referring them to legal services organizations who can directly work on their case;
  • conducting home visits on foster parents to ensure that the home is safe for minors;
  • training, information sharing and guiding of sponsors of unaccompanied children around issues ranging from education, legal assistance, and child welfare laws. 

Your donations to this effort will help us respond quickly and efficiently to families as they are released from detention.

Links:

Aug 6, 2019

Help Protect Asylum Seekers--Update

When families or separated children are released from detention, they need immediate assistance and resources to arrive to their destination, address basic needs, and receive critical referrals for social and legal services. IRC’s response offers a range of emergency services including needs assessment, temporary shelter, and transportation assistance, emergency medical services, access to phones and computers, food and cash assistance, referrals for services in destination location, know your rights and basic guidance, and mental health screenings.

For nearly five years, the IRC has worked with unaccompanied children from Central America seeking asylum in the United States. Prior to the new policy, unaccompanied children were not forcibly separated from their parents, but rather had come to the U.S. to seek protection on their own, often with the intention of reuniting with other family members residing in the U.S. Many of these unaccompanied children who had traveled alone were older children or teens.

Now, the population of unaccompanied children in U.S. custody includes thousands of children, including many babies and toddlers, who were taken from their parents at the border.

The IRC oversees post-release services for unaccompanied children, which includes:

  • connecting them to legal providers to help with their asylum claim;
  • providing unaccompanied children and sponsors basic orientation on their rights before referring them to legal services organizations who can directly work on their case;
  • conducting home visits on foster parents to ensure that the home is safe for minors;
  • training, information sharing and guiding of sponsors of unaccompanied children around issues ranging from education, legal assistance, and child welfare laws. 

Your donations to this effort will help us respond quickly and efficiently to families as they are released from detention.

Links:

 
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