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Jun 21, 2018

The story of Marcos, farmer and training participant

Marcos, farmer and training participant
Marcos, farmer and training participant

In Brazil, WeForest and our partners are demonstrating that biodiversity friendly land use alternatives are possible. Through planting connecting corridors between patches of forest, we restore the Atlantic Forest, a highly threatened and biologically significant ecoregion stretching from northeast Brazil to Paraguay.

Meet Marcos, a 75 year-old farmer who was recently trained in agroforestry and organic farming. After moving around various parts of Brazil and cultivating land, Marcos settled in Paranapanema when he was already 50, attracted by the promise of land ownership by the government. After six years of waiting, he was finally able to acquire several hectares of land, and he has been actively cultivating them since.

Marcos took part in training on agroforestry and organic farming: to grow his income and to boost the productivity of his farm, tree species such as pineapple, orange and jackfruit were planted. The additional forest cover also helped animals return to the area. “Last week my son spotted a giant anteater while herding our cattle and I recently saw some foxes, coatis and agoutis”.

Thanks to your support, we can provide even more training to farmers like Marcos and keep adding to more than 1 million trees we have already planted in the Atlantic Forest. These trees directly restore more than 600 hectares of forest, which are estimated to positively impact 45 000 hectares of land, bringing benefits to people, ecosystems and climate.

One of the community tree nurseries
One of the community tree nurseries
A restoration plot with young trees
A restoration plot with young trees
Jun 21, 2018

The story of Medalin, clean cooking champion

Medalin, clean cooking champion
Medalin, clean cooking champion

In the Khasi Hills in India, WeForest partnered with a federation of 10 indigenous governments and 62 Khasi villages to restore areas of forest through assisted natural regeneration with enrichment planting. Communities are empowered and run the nurseries that provide the seedlings. The project also tackles the drivers of deforestation (charcoal production, grazing and forest fires): fuel efficient cooking sets and subsidies for LPG connections are being provided for households to reduce the pressure on forests.

Meet Medalin, a 32 year-old labourer and mother of four living in the Mawlum Thyrsad Village. In the past, her family used up more than 1800 kg of firewood for cooking every year. In addition to being inefficient and contributing to tree felling, their dependence on firewood added more than 200 euros equivalent to the family’s annual expenses. In the winter, the family also had to operate a costly electric heater.

Thanks to a 40% subsidy from WeForest, Medalin was able to afford an LPG connection. Now she uses gas for both cooking and heating for a fraction of the cost, protecting her family from the health-damaging smoke and protecting the forests of the Khasi Hills.

Thanks to your support, we can continue engaging members of the Khasi community like Medalin and keep adding to more than 1.5 million trees we have already planted in the Khasi Hills. These trees directly restore more than 2 200 hectares of forest, bringing benefits to people, ecosystems and climate.

Demonstrating an LPG cooking stove to Khasi women
Demonstrating an LPG cooking stove to Khasi women
The landscape of the Khasi Hills
The landscape of the Khasi Hills
Jun 21, 2018

The story of Weresech, tree planting worker

Tree planting worker Weresech with her child
Tree planting worker Weresech with her child

Weresech is 32 years old, has 7 children and is one of the women directly benefiting from our work in the Seret village in the Tigray region of Ethiopia. Weresech and her husband Gebreegziabhare own 0.5 ha of land, which is not sufficient to produce enough grain to feed their entire family throughout the year. To provide for their children and to be able to send their 3 eldest children to school, both of them must work outside of their farm.

Their farm is adjacent to a WeForest intervention site. Since 2017, Weresech has a regular job with WeForest, contributing to site preparation, planting, weeding and watering new seedlings.

Between July 2017 and January 2018 she earned about 1200 ETB from the project, which is enough to pay for school and part of the family’s health expenses. She proudly said: “I have directly planted and cared for over 250 new trees last year.” She will be working on planting activities again during the upcoming season, between July and January.

Weresech is also going to join our new beekeeping program for farmers. She said: “I am lucky to have been chosen for this program and sell the honey our beehives produce at a good price through our cooperative.” Last but not least, she and other villagers involved are starting to see the benefits of forest restoration itself. After protecting ‘exclosures’ from grazing and illegal logging, they can harvest grass and the soils are better protected from erosion and landslides when it rains.

Thanks to your support, we can continue engaging members of the local community like Weresech and keep adding to nearly 40 thousand trees we have already planted in Ethiopia Tigray. These trees directly restore more than 50 hectares of forest, which is expected to positively impact 700 hectares of land, bringing benefits to people, ecosystems and climate.

Seret exclosure in Tigray in spring 2018
Seret exclosure in Tigray in spring 2018
 
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