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Sep 18, 2018

Your support protects the endangered Lion Tamarins

Black Lion Tamarin
Black Lion Tamarin

Your support is protecting the endangered Black Lion Tamarin

The Brazilian Atlantic forest is one of the most biodiverse spots in the world, yet due to severe habitat destruction many species are under threat of extinction. The Black Lion Tamarin is one of such species: its population has been declining drastically and today only about 1500 individuals remain in the Pontal Do Panarapanema region.
This is where you make a difference: thanks to your support, several tree wildlife corridors have been planted. These connect remaining forest areas in the region and allow greater movement of individuals. Not only does this increase food security, the Tamarin’s chance of finding a suitable partner does too.

Joining the PACT for a bigger IMPACT

In  April  2018,  WeForest  joined  a  coalition  of  more  than  270  companies,  public  agencies,  research  centers  and  NGOs  called  the  Atlantic  Forest  Restoration  Pact.  With  more  than  2  million  hectares  deforested  in  the  last  decade,  the  Atlantic  Forest  is  highly  threatened.  The  Pact  aims  to  restore  15  million  hectares  of  the  Atlantic  Forest  by  2050.WeForest’s  forest  landscape  restoration  activities  directly  contribute  to  achieving  the  goal.  WeForest  also  shares  within  the  Pact  its  research  findings  and  collaborates  with  other  researchers  on  analysing  data  on  forest  growth  to  identify  areas  with  high  potential  for  forest  landscape  restoration.

Atlantic Forest Restoration Pact
Atlantic Forest Restoration Pact
Aug 6, 2018

Helping Female Farmers Become More Financially Independent

Veronica S. showing her small-scale tree nursery
Veronica S. showing her small-scale tree nursery

Female farmers participating in our project can apply for an additional training: the "Plant Nursery Management Training".
In two days, they learn how to sow seeds, grow plants, graft and even bud trees!

One of the 15 trainees who completed their 2-day training, is Mrs.Veronica S*. As of today, she is able to grow her own trees in her own nursery. Altough her nursery is in its beginning phase, Veronica is already planning to expand it: she would like to grow and sell fruit and timber saplings to farmers in her neighbourhood. This allows her to diversify her income.  

Thanks to your support, we can support Veronica and other farmers in the Copperbelt region to obtain a 2-day training that will help them become more financially independent and obtain a more stable source of income. 


*Family name was removed to protect Veronica's privacy.

Female farmers learning to graft and bud trees
Female farmers learning to graft and bud trees

Links:

Jul 16, 2018

The story of Alemayehu, farmer and training participant

Alemayehu working in his field
Alemayehu working in his field

Making communities stewards of their forests is the only way we know to protect and restore forests in the long term. The region of Amhara in Ethiopia is under severe threat from land degradation and soil erosion as a result of widespread deforestation: its forests are highly fragmented and extensive gullies also threaten agricultural land and settlements. WeForest helps the rural communities counter unsustainable forest use by providing them with training and involving them in forest restoration and protection.

Meet Alemayehu, a 40 year-old farmer who lives in the Lay Damot Kebele village together with his wife and four children. He was selected for our train-the-trainer program to learn about integrated land and forest rehabilitation. He is now able to train the other farmers in agro-forestry.

Alemayehu learned, for example, that coffee trees best thrive when they are protected by the shade from other trees. Last year, he planted 200 Coffee arabica trees together with 150 Cordia africana and Albezia gummifera trees.

Alemayehu also planted Rhamnus prinoides, a shrub that offers Ethiopian farmers a valuable source of income and is also useful for domestic use. The extract from rhamnus stems is used as medicine and in the brewing of tella, an Ethiopian beer. Its leaves are pounded into flour and sold. Alemayehu proudly said: “My coffee and rahmnus trees provide me with an additional income to cover my family’s health expenses and education costs.”

Thanks to your support, we can provide even more training to farmers like Alemayehu and keep adding to more than 1.2 million trees we have already planted in the Amhara region. These trees directly restore more than 600 hectares of forest, which are estimated to positively impact 8 500 hectares of land - bringing benefits to people, ecosystems and climate.

Staff in the community-led training center
Staff in the community-led training center
Farmers participate in a training on tree planting
Farmers participate in a training on tree planting
 
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