Dec 1, 2020

Environmental Award from the Japanese Government

Planted trees fell by strong wind during typhoon
Planted trees fell by strong wind during typhoon

We wish to extend our deepest gratitude to GlobalGiving donors for your generous support.

We are happy to share with you the good news.

On October 17, OISCA was one of the organizations that received the Environmental Award from the Japanese Government. This is in recognition to more than 13 years of initiative to restore Mt. Fuji’s forest ecosystem by planting broad-lead species of trees in collaboration with various companies and volunteers.

The saplings of Japanese oak, beech, wild cherry, alder, and maple that we started to plant in 2007 have grown into an average of 5 meters high (the tallest have reached 10 meters high). Unfortunately, these growing trees are vulnerable from extreme weather condition such as typhoons, strong winds, heavy snow falls, and deer infestation. We have been doing various interventions with the help of volunteers to protect these trees to guarantee their survival. However, due to corona, the site maintenance activities involving volunteers that we planned to implement this year were all canceled. With the help of sub-contracted forest workers and our staff, we raised up the growing trees that have collapsed and re-installed nets and bamboo sticks to protect them from deer. Despite our efforts, we just managed to cover only 40% of our target area this year. We are still far behind the schedule.

With your support, we hope to raise more funds to enable us to buy materials such as nets and bamboo sticks needed for the site maintenance, hire more professional forest workers, and transportation cost of staff to the site. If we can sustain our project and with continuous proper maintenance, we hope that these growing broad-leaf species of trees will gradually replace the monoculture shirabe forest of Mt. Fuji. Inspired by the noticeable improvement of biodiversity within our 100 hectares project site, with your support, we are committed to hasten Mt. Fuji`s regeneration.

Nets are put to protect the growing tree from deer
Nets are put to protect the growing tree from deer
Re-installed nets supported with bamboo sticks
Re-installed nets supported with bamboo sticks
Sub-contracted forest workers hauling bamboo stick
Sub-contracted forest workers hauling bamboo stick
Planted maple tree has grown more than 5-m high.
Planted maple tree has grown more than 5-m high.
Trunks of the planted sakura tree.
Trunks of the planted sakura tree.
Elusive fox seen at our project site.
Elusive fox seen at our project site.
The Environmental Award Certificate
The Environmental Award Certificate
Oct 19, 2020

Last Tree Planting Activity Along Natori Coast

Mayor Shiro Yamada while planting black pines.
Mayor Shiro Yamada while planting black pines.

We are currently carrying out our last tree planting activity along the coast of Natori City in Miyagi Prefecture. This year, we covered an area of 2.18 hectares and planted it with 12,000 black pine seedlings to complete out target area of 100 hectares.

On October 6, various project stakeholders including the members of the Association for the Restoration of Coastal Forest in Natori City, government officials of Natori City led by Mayor Shiro Yamada, professional forestry workers, Ms. Etsuko Nakano, OISCA Japan President, and mobilized volunteers participated in the tree planting activity. Prior to transplanting, the black pine seedlings raised by the Association members were soaked in a polymer solution to guarantee the survival of seedlings under the extreme condition.

Natori Mayor Shiro Yamada, while struggling hard with an unfamiliar field work did his best in planting seedlings together with other participants. Boarding the 27-meter high platform, Mayor Shimada had the chance to see the aerial view of the 5-kilometer-long project. He commented: “with the help of more than 10,000 volunteers, we have come to this point. We do hope it will be a citizens’ forest in the future.”

The 10-year project was first conceived and implemented following the devastation of the coastal forest in March, 2011. So far, about 370,000 seedlings were planted and the survival rate is remarkable 99.1% since the first tree planting 7 years ago. The seedlings planted in the early stage have now grown into splendid trees over 4 meters in height. The total cost of the project including future maintenance work is estimated to amount to one billion yen to be entirely raised through donations and grants from Japanese and foreign private companies and organizations.

From March 2021, the project will move to the 2nd 10- year project mainly for maintenance work such as weeding and thinning. This tree planting event attracted a strong interest from national and local media. NHK (Japan Broadcasting Corporation) filmed it and broadcasted as a hot news program nationally on TV and a local news radio program on the same day. Other TV and newspapers such Miyagi TV, HIGASHINIPPON Broadcasting, the YOMIURI SHIMBUN and the KAHOKUSHIMPO also carried out on site coverage and respectively reported it.

Soaking of seedlings into polymer solution.
Soaking of seedlings into polymer solution.
Project`s media coverage at the site.
Project`s media coverage at the site.
Highest trees have grown into more than 4-m high.
Highest trees have grown into more than 4-m high.
Mayor Yamada observing the project from above.
Mayor Yamada observing the project from above.
Sep 29, 2020

To the supporters of our community project in Ra,

On behalf of the local villagers of Nakorotubu District, Ra Province, I would like to extend my deepest gratitude to GlobalGiving Donors for your generous support to our project.

In an effort to expand our Coastal Forest Restoration Project within Nakorotubu District, we conducted an awareness seminar involving the locals of Naocobau Village on September 23, 2020. The reason behind this decision is that among the seven villages in Nakorotubu District, Naocobau has the lowest number of mangrove vegetation cover. This made the locals vulnerable from strong winds, especially during cyclone season. It was felt by the locals when cyclone Winston hit Fiji in 2016. Without any mangroves that were supposedly shield them from strong winds and waves, the Naocobau villagers were immensely impacted by the cyclone.

Similar with what we have done in Saioko Village, we are collaborating with the village leaders to promote a sustainable community-led mangrove reforestation project. Through the workshop, the villagers realized the importance of planting mangroves to create a natural shield that will protect them from future natural calamities and to improve their coastal ecosystem. The Naocobau villagers are hopeful that just like the villagers of Saioko, in the near future, they will also experience having an extra source of income because of fish abundance.

Hoping for the immediate realization of their dream, right after the workshop, we worked together with the 30 villagers on the planting of 882 mangrove seedlings. We planted Rhizopora mucronata, a mangrove species suitable to be planted in the site.

 
WARNING: Javascript is currently disabled or is not available in your browser. GlobalGiving makes extensive use of Javascript and will not function properly with Javascript disabled. Please enable Javascript and refresh this page.