Jun 15, 2021

To the Supporters of our Project in Natori

Selective cutting of black pines
Selective cutting of black pines

We wish to extend our deepest gratitude for your continuous support to our project in Natori. Without your generosity, it would be difficult for us to implement the needed activities.

Our project is now on its second phase and despite the corona pandemic, we are working hard together with the government`s forest experts, sub-contracted forest workers, and mobilized local volunteers for the maintenance of our project site.

On May 17, we conducted a thinning trial together with the Miyagi Central Forestry experts and Matsushima General Forest. In an area of 0.12 hectare, we meticulously removed a total of 138 growing black-pine trees. For the entire process of thinning, we needed 6 people who had to work relay for the safe and efficient removal of the black-pines away from the site. One person was assigned for the actual cutting using a small chainsaw, 4 persons to carry them outside, and 1 person to load on the truck. If the cut trees are left within the project site to rot, it will become a hotbed for damaging pine worms.

Here are the three main reasons why there is a need to do thinning:

  1. Thinning will promote horizontal growth of roots which is important for growing strong, big, and sturdy individual trees tolerant to natural disturbance. This is crucial for the creation of a healthy and resilient forest that will protect the people from disasters, wind-blown sand, salt-spray, and strong wind. Moreover, the pre-tsunami black-pines were never thinned and as a result, they were easily uprooted and wiped-out by tsunami.
  2. With thinning, sunlight could freely penetrate the ground and will prevent black-pines` lower branches from withering. Both the lower and upper branches of the black-pines are crucial for the protection of the communities and their agricultural farms from disasters, wind-blown sand, salt-spray, and strong wind.
  3. Thinning encourages undergrowth expansion, plant diversity, and improve wildlife habitat. Undergrowth hampers movement of wind-blown sand/soil that can be damaging to the agricultural farms.

We initially scheduled to do thinning in 2023, but due to the unexpected fast growth of our black-pines, we felt the need to immediately reduce the number of standing trees starting this year. Following the guidelines of Japan`s Forest Agency, we are scheduled to remove at least 25% or 6,250 black-pines planted in 5-hectare 2014 site.

 

 

Loading of cut trees on the dump truck.
Loading of cut trees on the dump truck.
May 27, 2021

To the supporters of our project in Fiji

A local showing the crab he caught
A local showing the crab he caught

On behalf of the local villagers of Nakorotubu District, Ra Province, I would like to extend my deepest gratitude to GlobalGiving Donors for your generous support to our project.


Our activities have stagnated due to the spike of corona positive cases on the islands. However, at some point, while following safety precautions to prevent the virus from spreading, we were able to set-up smoothly the nursery in preparation for the next mangrove planting season. We are also planning to install fences within our nursery to protect the mangrove seedlings from being eaten by stray goats. Other than mangrove planting, we were able to plant upland trees in cooperation with the local villagers.

The locals are struggling to survive because of the movement restriction due to COVID and the two consecutive cyclones that hit their village. In spite of this, the locals are grateful that the mangroves that they planted before are helping them to survive. The mangroves serve as home of fish, crabs, and other wildlife. Their abundance and availability feed the locals and when sold, aid the local people`s income. Because of this, there is no need for the local fishermen to go far and risk their lives from strong waves just to catch fish. Moreover, since the fish are available nearby, there is no need for the local fishermen to spend a lot of money for fuel/diesel for boat engine. We heard that since the fish source is basically almost in their front yard, even women villagers can also do fishing for their own consumption.

Meanwhile, in collaboration with other international organization, we have set-up a crab culture within the mangrove project site to help aid the income of the locals. As we work together with the locals, we are committed to protect and preserve the already existing mangroves, as well as continuously the degraded shorelines.

We hope that with your generous support, it will enable us to continue our mission to involve the local villagers in planting more mangroves, and educate the locals of the importance of conserving and protecting them.

Mangroves that will soon protect the locals.
Mangroves that will soon protect the locals.
Mar 31, 2021

To the supporters of our Mt. Fuji Project

Fallen maple tree from the strong typhoon.
Fallen maple tree from the strong typhoon.

We wish to extend our sincerest gratitude to GlobalGiving donors for your generous support.

Based on the survey result that we conducted last year, we found out that 25% of the growing trees that we have planted in our site are in great need of tender loving care. Strong typhoons that hit Japan, heavy snow falls in winter season, and deer infestation affect the growth or worse will result to their mortality. We felt the immediate need to re-raise the fallen trees, replace the rotting bamboo sticks, and reinstall the nets to guarantee the survival rate of our project site. Unfortunately, because of corona, we have no choice but to cancel all the scheduled volunteer related activities. As a consequence, we are lagging behind the schedule.

 From October to early November 2020, within our network (OISCA staff and OISCA members), we managed to recover a total of 1,100 fallen trees with the help of local foresters. It is impossible for us to implement activities from December to April 2021 because of snow, but our activities will resume in May 2021.

 Meanwhile, as part of our endeavor to promote the sustainable use of Mt. Fuji’s resources, we are supporting the launch of small and medium-size local businesses venturing into the utilization of forest resources. One of these companies venture into the extraction of aroma oil from shirabe trees. In February, we donated 1,000 pieces of 30ml shirabe aroma alcohol spray to health care centers and healthcare personnel’s fighting corona.

 On March 25, we organized a general meeting involving the 21 companies and organizations involved in our project to discuss the project`s current situation and future plans on how to cope up with the corona situation.

Trees damaged by strong typhoon.
Trees damaged by strong typhoon.
The actual site maintenance.
The actual site maintenance.
Assessment of our site condition.
Assessment of our site condition.
Donation of 1,000 pieces of shirabe alcohol spray
Donation of 1,000 pieces of shirabe alcohol spray
Certificate of Appreciation for donating alcohol.
Certificate of Appreciation for donating alcohol.
Actual site maintenance
Actual site maintenance
 
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