Jul 12, 2016

Madagascar: Fighting Discouragement

Mental Health Training in Madagascar
Mental Health Training in Madagascar

In the developing world, mental health resources are usually not easily accessed—if they are available at all. People go to pastors, traditional healers, teachers, regular health clinics, or organizations for help. Working along with the Mercy Ships mental health program in Madagascar, Tributaries International recently helped equip 37 formal and informal service providers from 15 different organizations. Participants from children’s centers, shelters, clinics, hospitals, and churches were trained in basic mental health.

Juliette is a physician who cares for people with leprosy and tuberculosis. She came to the training to find ways to keep her patients encouraged. “It's very difficult,” she says, “to find a way to support and encourage them.”

Diagnosis of one of these diseases results in instant poverty and isolation. “Because of the illness they cannot work, so people I'm treating are also beggars. Everything is so difficult for them. They can't even take the pousse-pousse (bicycle rickshaw) or tuk-tuk (a small motorized vehicle) to come for treatment. No one will take them.”

Juliette also raises awareness at local schools, so the children of people with leprosy don’t lose out on an education. Even though a person with leprosy can’t spread the disease after just one week of treatment, schools don’t want the children of lepers. She says after training they do change, but the children can still face prejudice. The whole family suffers—children, parents, grandparents—the stigma and difficulty of treatment wears them down.

Treatment takes six months to a year, and it is challenging to keep up the regimen. Most people lose hope. “I need to encourage them so they will not give up but finish the treatment.”

The mental health training has encouraged Juliette and has given her new ways to bring hope to the people she serves.

Tributaries International partners with Mercy Ships for mental health in Africa. Earlier this year, we collaborated for mental health training in Madagascar, Cameroon, and Benin. We’ll share more about the workshops in future updates.

Later this summer and early fall, the TI mental health team will provide training in Myanmar, Sri Lanka, and Nepal. 

Your donation of $50 provides 5 days of training for a community worker.

THANK YOU for helping to make these life-changing workshops possible!

Equipping workers from 15 different organizations
Equipping workers from 15 different organizations
Collaborating with Mercy Ships in Madagascar
Collaborating with Mercy Ships in Madagascar

Links:

May 16, 2016

Our Good Days Are Coming!

More than a year in temporary shelter...
More than a year in temporary shelter...

“Our good days are coming…!” That’s what people here said when they learned they were getting houses.

For over a year now, since two powerful earthquakes shook Nepal, people in the Nuwakat area have been living in makeshift shelters. They’ve used materials salvaged from their destroyed homes, and whatever else they could find to protect themselves through winter and the monsoons.

“People are trying their best to cover themselves with what they have, but that is not even meeting their basic needs.” says Mohan Raj Bhatt, National Program Coordinator for Hope for Nepal.

After delays from the fuel shortage and some technical difficulties, Hope for Nepal has begun to rebuild homes for ten families. Many others are still waiting.

In addition to houses, Hope for Nepal has been able to provide some counseling for quake victims, who are still suffering from the psychological trauma of the quakes.

THANK YOU for your generous support of rebuilding efforts in Nepal! 

Construction of framing begins!
Construction of framing begins!

Links:

Apr 18, 2016

Mental Health Training Helps Quake Survivors

Home destroyed by the quake
Home destroyed by the quake

April 25 marks one year since a devastating earthquake struck Nepal. Especially in remote areas near the epicenter, people are still without many of their basic needs being met. They live with daily uncertainty, struggling to survive. Their losses are tremendous – family, homes, livelihoods, and belongings including clothing and tools. Little progress has been made to meet their needs, which only adds to the psychological toll.

In September 2016, we will train 35-50 informal community care providers in basic mental health and trauma. These care providers live and work in the districts identified as most severely affected by the quake. Special focus will be nurses and other healthcare workers, teachers, and children's workers. 

Some of the church leaders we trained last year shared what they learned with community leaders from near epicenter. As a result, people are beginning to find help with their emotional wounds. The Tributaries International team will also follow up with care providers trained last year. 

On the quake's anniversary, APRIL 25, beginning at 9:00 EDT (14:00 BST), GlobalGiving is matching your donations to this project by 100%. We hope you will consider giving on this special day to bring healing 

Thank you for supporting the effort to equip local care providers in psychosocial care!

Counseling Training
Counseling Training

Links:

 
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