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 Health  Cambodia Project #25218

Water for Health in Pu Char Village

by Cambodian Rural Development Team
Water for Health in Pu Char Village
Water for Health in Pu Char Village
Water for Health in Pu Char Village
Water for Health in Pu Char Village
Water for Health in Pu Char Village
Water for Health in Pu Char Village
Water for Health in Pu Char Village
Water for Health in Pu Char Village
Water for Health in Pu Char Village
Water for Health in Pu Char Village
Water for Health in Pu Char Village
Water for Health in Pu Char Village
Water for Health in Pu Char Village
Mr. Korlong
Mr. Korlong

Dear reader,

By the time you are reading this we have already given full stewardship of the project to the villagers of Pu Char.
We are happy to announce that now 70 families from the Bunong indigenous group are provided with clean water for drinking and irrigation. The Water Committee is saving money to maintain the water system and the two water tanks that provide the village with water. This is to ensure that the project is sustainable.

The availability of clean water just at their homes have given the villagers a sense of wealth they had not experienced before. This, together with latrines and the essential training on hygiene and sanitation has increased the health of the villagers by eliminating water borne diseases.

What is more, the people are now happily applying the knowledge they have gained from the numerous training courses provided by the CRDT. People are engaged in vegetable growing and livestock raising and can sell the surplus to the market. The establishment of an agricultural cooperative is increasing the power of the farmers.

Due to the succes of this project, we are no implementing projects that share the same design in the provinces of Kratie and Stung Treng.

For all our donors, we would like to send our heartfelt gratitude for making this project such a great success. Like our friends from Pu Char village, we wish you health and happiness!

Mr. Korlong at his lush green vegetable garden
Mr. Korlong at his lush green vegetable garden

Links:

Mr. Chan building his own latrine
Mr. Chan building his own latrine

We have come a long way since we first entered Pu Char Village to improve the living conditions of the people there.The two water supply systems, together with the water filters, provides the 70 families with clean and safe drinking water, in addition to water for the fields. What is more, people have started their own businesses of vegetable farming and livestock raising. Still, there is some more work to do.

One of the challenges remaining is to convince the villagers to build and use latrines. Even when some villagers said ‘yes’ at the meetings, they did not actually build the latrines. The habit for open defecation seemed too strong. Things have changed however, as the fruits of the labour of our Community-Led Total Sanitation (CLTS) project are starting to show. CLTS is the practice of community members to encourage and motivate fellow villagers to practice safe sanitation practices. Authorities within the communities serve as model villagers for others. So, instead of just providing the latrines and impose an alien idea of sanitation, the basic principle of CLTS is to let change happen from within.

Villagers have followed the example of model villagers who have built latrines already. Now more than half of the village have their own latrine, and the number continues to grow. The following case study will explain our success on the improving sanitation practices of Pu Char village. It tells the story of Mr. Chan who has been convinced by his neighbour to build his own latrine for him and his family to use.

“Before, we would go anywhere to relieve ourselves, to the forest or the rice fields. Sometimes we had to walk long distances. But when it rained we did not want to walk so far, so we did it close to our homes. We did not think that it would be bad for our health, we had always done it this way. But at some point, things changed. People in the village started to build latrines. At first, I did not understand why and I just continued my old ways. I did not want to spend any money on a latrine. I thought: ‘Why would you make a special place to poo, when you can do it anywhere?’  

However, when I asked my neighbour about it, I started to understand why he built it. He explained to me how the excreta can go into the water. I said to him, well, then I will just go far into the forest so my poo will not go into the water. Then he said, ‘but what if it rains, do you want to go all the way to the forest?’ ‘Maybe yes’, I said. ‘Okay’, he said, ‘even if you do, other people may just do it close to their homes, and it will still end up in the water.’ ‘And you will use that water to wash your food or other people may still use it to drink.’ It got me thinking, but I was still not prepared to spend money on a latrine.

Then he started telling me about the price I would pay if my daughter would get sick because of unclean water. And then he compared it to the cost of building a latrine. It was only then that I finally understood why he built the latrine. The cost of building a latrine is nothing compared to the price I would pay if my daughter would get sick, and of course I do not want my daughter to get sick in the first place! That is why I am building a latrine now myself and I am convincing my family to do the same.”

Mr. Chan would not have been able to build his latrine without your financial support. There is still some work to do in the village as not all families have built a latrine yet. Your donation will help in training the villagers on proper sanitation practices and aid in building new latrines. And in general, thanks to your contribution, the well-being of the families will also be improved through our other projects, like sustainable businesses, which are still ongoing. Your contributions will greatly change the lives of the people forever!

Mr. Sok, relative of Mr. Chan at his new latrine
Mr. Sok, relative of Mr. Chan at his new latrine

Links:

Her son at vegetable farm
Her son at vegetable farm

Access to clean water and adequate sanitation is a human right that should be afforded to every individual. However, this is often not the case in rural Cambodia. It is difficult to retrieve clean water and often takes much time whereas the easily accessible water contains bacteria, dust, insects, and pollution. This is why so many families and children are often very sick. Clean water is necessary for drinking, bathing, sanitation, cleaning your home, cooking, feeding animals, and growing vegetables. To meet all these needs, you would need to carry many heavy water buckets to and from the water the supply and to your home.

This was the life for the 70 indigenous families living in the Pu Char village before CRDT began its "Water for Health" project, funded by the Australian Government and your donations.

This project aims to improve the health and economic situation for the Indigenous families living in the Pu Char village, through providing fresh clean water to all. Much of the main aspects of the project have been achieved but there is still work to be done.

A widow women works to support family

Ms. Kunthy is 53 years old who has one daughter living with her in a small house in Puchar village. Kunthy has one hectare of rice farm.  Unfortunately, it was damaged by a drought in 2015 leaving her family with  food shortage, so to full fill the food shortage period, She has to sell her labor to nearby village, sell a cow and borrow some money from Microfinance Finance Institute (MFI).

Ms. Kunthy has a regular income from selling oranges, coconuts and chickens. She added that when the weather is too hot. She is sick, and she sometime got diarrhoea which she is spending around 200.000 Khmer Riel for her treatment at the health centre. She said, “I am so please with the water for health project that CRDT provided, We knew the way to treat water for safe drinking like boiled, using water filter and washing our hand after using toilet and before we eat food.”

 Ms. Kunthy is one of the beneficiary among 70 households in Puchar village community. She has received the training on primary health and technique on agriculture. She applied the techniques on vegetable growing, and chicken raising which was conducted by CRDT staff by using water supply system.

She expanded her vegetable growing land from 0.3 are (a) to 10 are (a) increasing the supply for her family daily home consumption. Now she can save 2000 Riel (0.5USD) every day from having her own vegetables instead of buying them from the sellers. She can have a total income of 540.000 Riel (135USD) from selling vegetable to villagers. In the meantime, her income from chicken raising has increased after she applied the technique that CRDT provided. She can earn 1.972.000 Riel (493USD) not including the cost of 2 to 4 chickens that her family consumes per month.

‘Today, it is better, not like before any more, that we rarely have chicken and many kind of vegetables to sell and eat. Our family health is good and family income also increases. I am very happy and feeling to share and welcomes for the other villager to visit my farm and provide the good practice experience to them to apply like my family”. Ms. Kunthy said.

CRDT has also followed up the previous training on primary health, and continues to provide training on health to the Pu Char community. It is very important for our beneficiaries, including Mr. Sameuron and his family, as it helps to reduce the money burden that is required when going to the hospital. CRDT also continues to provide Sanitation and Hygiene training to improve the health situation amongst the indigenous communities.

The main aspect of the project has been achieved thanks to your participation, but there is work still to be carried out. Some of the houses in the village have not yet been linked to the water system. It is also highly important to provide the necessary training, which is currently pending. Your donations will help contribute towards implementing this training and all the reading materials required to raise awareness within the community. Additionally, some toilet and sanitation facilities still need to be built. Your contributions will greatly change the lives of these people forever!

Kunthy is taking care her vegetable farm
Kunthy is taking care her vegetable farm

Links:

Mr. Sameuron with his business plan at the back
Mr. Sameuron with his business plan at the back

Access to clean water and adequate sanitation is a human right that should be afforded to every individual. However, this is often not the case in rural Cambodia. It is difficult to retrieve clean water and often takes much time whereas the easily accessible water contains bacteria, dust, insects, and pollution. This is why so many families and children are often very sick. Clean water is necessary for drinking, bathing, sanitation, cleaning your home, cooking, feeding animals, and growing vegetables. To meet all these needs, you would need to carry many heavy water buckets to and from the water the supply and to your home.

This was the life for the 70 indigenous families living in the Pu Char village before CRDT began its "Water for Health" project, funded by the Australian Government and your donations.

This project aims to improve the health and economic situation for the Indigenous families living in the Pu Char village, through providing fresh clean water to all. Much of the main aspects of the project have been achieved but there is still work to be done.

Mr. Sameuron lives in Pu Char village; he is one of the saving group members. He enrolled as a member in January 2017. As a benefit of the saving group, Mr. Sameuron is now able to receive various trainings from Cambodian Rural Development Team (CRDT) such as vegetable growing, chicken, duck raising and business plan training.

With water for health project, Mr. Sameuron has decided to borrow a $1400 loan from his saving group to increase his vegetable business. He said, “I borrowed the load from my saving group, because I have access to water in my house as installed by CRDT, I will no longer worry about water shortage anymore. I will be able water the vegetables all year.

Mr. Sameuron grows various kinds of vegetables in his vegetable farm, including lemongrass, long bean, long chili, lettuce, eggplants, bottle ground, cucumber, pumpkin, ginger, and spinach.

He now earns $5 to $10 a day and will plant more a wide variety of crops in his vegetable farm.

CRDT has also followed up the previous training on primary health, and continues to provide training on health to the Pu Char community. It is very important for our beneficiaries, including Mr. Sameuron and his family, as it helps to reduce the money burden that is required when going to the hospital. CRDT also continues to provide Sanitation and Hygiene training to improve the health situation amongst the indigenous communities.

The main aspect of the project has been achieved thanks to your participation, but there is work still to be carried out. Some of the houses in the village have not yet been linked to the water system. It is also highly important to provide the necessary training, which is currently pending. Your donations will help contribute towards implementing this training and all the reading materials required to raise awareness within the community. Additionally, some toilet and sanitation facilities still need to be built. Your contributions will greatly change the lives of these people forever!

Mr. Sameuron
Mr. Sameuron's lettuce
CRDT staff visiting Mr. Sameuron
CRDT staff visiting Mr. Sameuron's home

Links:

Pig pen of Suoy Chantoen
Pig pen of Suoy Chantoen

Access to clean water and adequate sanitation is a human right that should be afforded to every individual. This is often not the case, however, in rural Cambodia. It is a difficult place to retrieve clean water, as the easily accessible water contains bacteria, dust, insects, and pollution. This is why so many families and children are often very sick. Clean water is necessary for drinking, bathing, sanitation, cleaning your home, cooking, feeding animals, and growing vegetables. To meet all these needs, you would need to carry heavy water buckets for many return trips.

This was the life for the 70 indigenous families living in the Pu Char village before CRDT began its "Water for Health" project, funded by the Australian Government and your donations.

This project aims to improve the health and economic situation for the Indigenous families living in the Pu Char village, through providing fresh clean water to all. Much of the main aspects of the project have been achieved but there is still work to be done.

Mr. Chantoen is 33 years old and lives with his wife, and his two children. Mr. Chantoen is interested in planting vegetables and raising livestock with the Water for Health project. For this reason, he decided to enrol as a project beneficiary. He joined business plan training with Ekareach Group in Pu Char village, which our project staff facilitated. Mr. Chantoen utilised his new skills for a pig famring business, and liaised the CRDT project team to oversee his business implementation. He now confidently raises pigs for reasons beyond family-use. In addition to raising livestock, he is also growing vegetables for daily consumption and animal food.

He explained, "I am able to raise livestock and grow vegetable due to our new water supply system here. In the past, we had to depend on rain water and water from the stream”. 

CRDT has also followed up the previous training on primary health, and continues to provide training on health to the Pu Char community. It is very important for our beneficiaries, including Mr. Chantoen and his family, as it helps to reduce the money burden that is required when going to the hospital. CRDT also continues to provide Sanitation and Hygiene training to improve the health situation amongst the indigenous communities.

The main aspect of the project has been achieved thanks to your participation, but there is work still to be carried out. Some of the houses in the village have not yet been linked to the water system. It is also highly important to provide the necessary training, which is currently pending. Your donations will help contribute towards implementing this training and all the reading materials required to raise awareness within the community. Additionally, some toilet and sanitation facilities still need to be built. Your contributions will greatly change the lives of these people forever!

Pig Food
Pig Food
 

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Organization Information

Cambodian Rural Development Team

Location: Kratie Town, Kratie Province - Cambodia
Website:
Facebook: Facebook Page
Twitter: @CRDT_Cambodia
Project Leader:
Or Channy
Kratie Town, Kratie Province Cambodia

Funded Project!

Combined with other sources of funding, this project raised enough money to fund the outlined activities and is no longer accepting donations.
   

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