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Help Stop Illegal Wildlife Trafficking

by Wildlife Alliance
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Help Stop Illegal Wildlife Trafficking
Help Stop Illegal Wildlife Trafficking
Help Stop Illegal Wildlife Trafficking
Help Stop Illegal Wildlife Trafficking
Help Stop Illegal Wildlife Trafficking
Help Stop Illegal Wildlife Trafficking
Help Stop Illegal Wildlife Trafficking
Help Stop Illegal Wildlife Trafficking
Help Stop Illegal Wildlife Trafficking
Help Stop Illegal Wildlife Trafficking
Help Stop Illegal Wildlife Trafficking
Help Stop Illegal Wildlife Trafficking
Help Stop Illegal Wildlife Trafficking
Help Stop Illegal Wildlife Trafficking
Help Stop Illegal Wildlife Trafficking
Help Stop Illegal Wildlife Trafficking
Help Stop Illegal Wildlife Trafficking

A smuggled shipment of 281 kg (620 lbs) of suspected lion bones was seized in Cambodia after it was shipped from South Africa last year. Two Vietnamese nationals who claimed ownership of the shipment are in jail and are being investigated by the Cambodian customs.  Cambodia is a well known transit country in the illegal wildlife trade for products heading to Vietnam and China. It is suspected that the lion bones were intended to be transported to Vietnam where they are popular in traditional medicines. 

In 2016, more than 1.2 tons of elephant tusks, representing over 300 slaughtered elephants, was intercepted by Cambodian Customs on December 16th. It is well known that Cambodia is a transit country for ivory, however, this is only the second case of a shipment of big cat parts being seized in Cambodia. Tests to confirm the exact species of the bones are planning to be carried out. Wildlife Alliance is pleased to once again be working with our colleagues in Customs in another major Africa-Asia wildlife trafficking case.

Thank you for your support, which allows us to to crack down on Cambodia's growing role in the international wildlife trade. 

P.S. - Next week (March 23-27) is a GlobalGiving matching campaign and all donations up to $50 will be matched at 50%! We're currently raising funds to care for over 500 animals the Wildlife Rapid Rescue Team confiscated from the illegal wildlife trade. 

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Social media often gets a bad rap even in the role it plays in wildlife trafficking. But our recent rescue of an endangered pileated gibbon (Hylobates pileatus) shows that social media can be used for good!

We received many reports of a video circulating on Facebook in Cambodia of a gibbon chained by the neck. The the Wildlife Rapid Rescue Team (WRRT) managed to track her down in Oddar Meanchey and were able to confiscate her with the assistance of local Forestry Administration officers. The beautiful female gibbon was brought to Phnom Tamao Wildlife Rescue Center where she will receive permanent care by our dedicated staff. Unfortunately, because she has become dependent on humans, is is unlikely that she will be able to return to the wild.

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October 18, 2019 - morning

Our wildlife trafficking team, the Wildlife Rapid Rescue Team (WRRT), rescued a badly injured sun bear cub, missing a paw, in Steung Treng province, in the northeast of Cambodia. After receiving a tip off, they left yesterday evening and drove all night to rescue the injured cub, finally rescuing it this morning.
They are now safely on their long way back to Phnom Tamao Wildlife Rescue Centre, where they will hand it over to Free the Bears for further care. 

 

October 18, 2019 - evening

The Wildlife Rapid Rescue Team (WRRT) successfully arrived at Phnom Tamao Wildlife Rescue Center (PTWRC) where the bear will be treated by Free the Bears. The tiny sun bear weighs just 5 kg (11 lbs) immediately received veterinary care for her horrific snare injury that has severed her paw.

 

October 25, 2019 update

X-rays revealed that an infection from the snare injury spread to the bones remaining in her paw, requiring partial amputation. After surgery, she is doing well. Her stitches are secure, she does not have much swelling, and she is growing stronger and feistier, a good sign! Follow Free the Bears for further updates on this bear’s recovery as they care for her at Phnom Tamao.

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50 yellow-headed temple turtles rescued
50 yellow-headed temple turtles rescued

Last month, Cambodia’s Economic Police intercepted a truck illegally transporting wildlife, including 57 monitor lizards and 50 yellow-headed temple turtles, which are Critically Endangered. Turtles are some of the most trafficked animals in Southeast Asia, largely for traditional medicine and meat and is driving many species towards extinction. Upon confiscating the wildlife, the Economic Police called the Wildlife Rapid Rescue Team (WRRT) to handle and release the reptiles.

The Wildlife Rapid Rescue Team has been Cambodia’s only law enforcement dedicated to countering wildlife crime since 2001 and while they have been very effective – having rescued nearly 75,000 animals from the wildlife trade – they are a small team with a nation-wide mandate. Getting calls like the one from the Economic Police are always welcome as it is a positive indicator that wildlife crimes are being taken more seriously and our efforts to collaborate with other law enforcement units has been effective.

The WRRT brought the water monitors to the Cardamom Rainforest Landscape where they were released with one of our ranger teams. The yellow-headed temple turtles, which are nearing extinction, were brought to and released in Tonle Sap Lake in collaboration with Fisheries Administration officers.

Your support of the WRRT has enabled us to shift attitudes towards taking wildlife trafficking as a serious crime throughout Cambodia.

Critically Endangered turtles return to the wild
Critically Endangered turtles return to the wild
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Last month, with information from an informant, the Wildlife Rapid Rescue Team (Cambodia’s multi-agency wildlife law enforcement unit which is run with technical and financial support from Wildlife Alliance) investigated an ivory carving shop in Phnom Penh. The WRRT, accompanied by local police, local Forestry Administration officials, and the Deputy Prosecutor of Phnom Penh Court, raided the suspects home and found 8 kg (17.6 lbs) of ivory, 5.7 kg (12.6 lbs) of wild pig tusks, one wild pig skull, 3 red muntjac deer skulls, and one Eld’s deer antler. The WRRT arrested the offender and brought him to the Phnom Penh Forestry Administration cantonment where a court case was filed against him. He has been released until the court issues a verdict.

The presence of ivory carving shops in Cambodia has been on the rise in recent years. While there is a small demand for ivory from Cambodians, the increase in demand is mainly fueled by foreign consumers, particularly Chinese nationals [source]. Since 2016 there has been an explosion of Chinese investment in Cambodia, which has resulted in a massive upsurge in Chinese tourist in the country, the primary target market for ivory shops in Cambodia. The Wildlife Rapid Rescue Team is working to crack down on and close ivory shops throughout Cambodia.

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Organization Information

Wildlife Alliance

Location: New York, NY - USA
Website:
Project Leader:
Jessica Knierim
Development Associate
New York, New York United States

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