Education  Kenya Project #42672

Training of 180 School of Hope Volunteer Teachers

by ChallengeAid
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Training of 180 School of Hope Volunteer Teachers
Training of 180 School of Hope Volunteer Teachers
Training of 180 School of Hope Volunteer Teachers
Training of 180 School of Hope Volunteer Teachers
Training of 180 School of Hope Volunteer Teachers
Training of 180 School of Hope Volunteer Teachers
Training of 180 School of Hope Volunteer Teachers
Training of 180 School of Hope Volunteer Teachers
Training of 180 School of Hope Volunteer Teachers
Training of 180 School of Hope Volunteer Teachers
Training of 180 School of Hope Volunteer Teachers
Training of 180 School of Hope Volunteer Teachers
Training of 180 School of Hope Volunteer Teachers
Training of 180 School of Hope Volunteer Teachers
Training of 180 School of Hope Volunteer Teachers
Training of 180 School of Hope Volunteer Teachers
Training of 180 School of Hope Volunteer Teachers
Training of 180 School of Hope Volunteer Teachers
Training of 180 School of Hope Volunteer Teachers

In this most difficult of times with the COVID19 pandemic - many of our Schools of Hope had been shut down as have all Government Schools in Kenya for much of last year. The good news is that everything is back on track in the next few weeks.Though schools are starting back people in the slums pupils have taken their exams and are currently expecting to receive their results.

Most people do not have savings so the idea of not working ultimately means starving so the past year has been a real problem for most families.. This is the situation in which hundreds of thousands have to exist - this is their reality.Restrictions are relaxing but but civil society is still not back to normal yet.

The Supervisors are in communication with ChallengeAid and we are currently motivating our volunteer supervisors. Many of our Form 4 leavers who are hoping to move on to Higher Education are already volunteering to become our next generation of leaders for the SoH's.The monthly meetings with the new supervisors is now occurring again and the training proccess is back to normal.at the moment.What does emerge from the situation is the need to get this training fully back on track as soon as we are able to cascade the learning to the young people who rely on the SoH's to fulfil their aspirations and turn them into a reality.Our ChallengeAid staff is iniating this process.

The one really positive story to tell is that because of school closures over the best part of last year ChallengeAid was able able to create online lessons for Form 4 students (equivalent of Yr13 A Level) in Maths, Physics, Chemistry & Biology. Over the past months students living in some of the most impoverished parts of Nairobi have been having online lessons from experienced volunteers in the UK. There have been at least one lesson of each subject each week with usually two Maths lessons. We have been teaching over 100 children with a total week's attendance of approximately 200. These lessons have been screened into 6 SoH's with the best wi-fi connectivity.The lessons have been projected from a laptop onto a white plain wall screen.These pupils who are currently benefitting will now have more chance of doing well in their KCSE exams with a greater liklihood of going on to University or vocational training and consequently returning back to the SoH's as better qualified supervisors.

So we are now working with the Association of Informal Schools in the slums of which the are approximately 100 and will be looking to provide Inset training for the teachers in those slums. The more funding we receive the better the chance we have of doing a top quality job. Many teachers have to teach at least two subjects so the need to upskill is really important for the pupils to receive quality learning.

In other words the need is occurring right now and we would love to progress with this project which just next year will have a direct effect on 2000 Form 4 Learners - please help us to help them !

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In this most difficult of times with the COVID19 pandemic - the Schools of Hope have been shut down as have all Government Schools in Kenya until end of November 2020. None of the Govrnment Schools are reopening till January 2021. The programme will spring back to life as soon as the shut down is relaxed at the start of 2021.Though schools are starting back people in the slums have been instructed to stay at home but for a typically averaage family of 5 in a 3' x 3' schack in a slum this is just not realistic. Additionally most people do not have savings so the idea of not working ultimately means starving. This is the situation in which hundreds of thousands have to exist - this is their reality.Restrictions are relaxing but but civil society is not back to normal.

The Supervisors are in communication with ChallengeAid but at this moment in time there is not much that can be done. The monthly meeting with the supervisors is not occurring at the moment but this could well chnge in the near future.What does emerge from the situation is the need to get this training back on track as soon as we are able to cascade the learning to the young people who rely on the SoH's to fulfil their aspirations and turn them into a reality.

This is a letter from Kibera regarding the Covid 19 Crisis reflecting life in the Informal Slum Settlement by a resident -

We had all assumed that things would return to normal and that a cure would soon be found for Corona virus but this did not happen. More people lost their jobs and the government placed a 7pm curfew in Nairobi. There was even talk of a lockdown, we were told a lockdown would be an order for all people to stay indoors. We were told this had been done in Europe and South Africa. Then reports reached us that in Europe people were dying by the thousands and it had become even impossible to bury them in a decent manner. It sounded like the end of the world was near. The government even called for a day of national prayer !

Desperate times call for extreme measures, since there was not enough money for feeding the children, jobs were not available in the city and the Corona virus seemed to affect people in Nairobi more. Most families hurriedly organized to send their children and the women to their rural homes but then we were also

told that we would be spreading the disease by doing this. It is an impossible situation.

Most of us who have no rural homes to go to; sit in our houses which are essentially one room shacks of about 10’x10’. It’s almost impossible for one person to spend a whole day inside of a shack in a slum let alone a family of 5. Most of us now spend the day waiting for a Good Samaritan to drop by with a bag of food; when food is available we share it with our neighbours who have none. When there is a rumour that there may be a charitable donation of food from an NGO into the slum that almost makes matters worse as it creates a stampede and all the good work that has been done by social distancing is ruined. Please don’t judge us harshly though because if you and your family haven’t eaten for days it is very difficult to grab the opportunity. On the bad days when there is nothing to be eaten, we just sleep with the hope that tomorrow will be a better day !

The one really positive story to tell is that because of school closures over the best part of last year ChallengeAid has been able to create online lessons for Form 4 students (equivalent of Yr13 A Level) in Maths, Physics, Chemistry & Biology. Over the past months students living in some of the most impoverished parts of Nairobi have been having online lessons from experienced volunteers in the UK. There have been at least one lesson of each subject each week with usually two Maths lessons. We have been teaching over 100 children with a total week's attendance of approximately 200. These lessons have been screened into the 4 SoH with the best wi-fi connectivity.The lessons have been projected from a laptop onto a white plain wall screen.

These pupils who are currently benefitting will now have more chance of doing well in their KCSE exams with a greater liklihood of going on to University or vocational training and consequently returning back to the SoH's as better qualified supervisors. 

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In this most difficult of times with the COVID19 pandemic - the Schools of Hope have been shut down as have all Government Schools in Kenya. None of the Goernment Schools are reopening till January 2021. The programme will spring back to life as soon as the shut down is relaxed at the start of 2021.People in the slums have been instructed to stay at home but for a typically averaage family of 5 in a 3' x 3' schack in a slum this is just not realistic. Additionally most people do not have savings so the idea of not working ultimately means starving. This is the situation in which hundreds of thousands have to exist - this is their reality.

The Supervisors are in communication with ChallengeAid but at this moment in time there is not much that can be done. What does emerge from the situation is the need to get this training back on track as soon as we are able to cascade the learning to the young people who rely on the SoH's to fulfil their aspirations and turn them into a reality.

This is a letter from Kibera regarding the Covid 19 Crisis reflecting life in the Informal Slum Settlement by a resident -

We had all assumed that things would return to normal and that a cure would soon be found for Corona virus but this did not happen. More people lost their jobs and the government placed a 7pm curfew in Nairobi. There was even talk of a lockdown, we were told a lockdown would be an order for all people to stay indoors. We were told this had been done in Europe and South Africa. Then reports reached us that in Europe people were dying by the thousands and it had become even impossible to bury them in a decent manner. It sounded like the end of the world was near. The government even called for a day of national prayer !

Desperate times call for extreme measures, since there was not enough money for feeding the children, jobs were not available in the city and the Corona virus seemed to affect people in Nairobi more. Most families hurriedly organized to send their children and the women to their rural homes but then we were also

told that we would be spreading the disease by doing this. It is an impossible situation.

Most of us who have no rural homes to go to; sit in our houses which are essentially one room shacks of about 10’x10’. It’s almost impossible for one person to spend a whole day inside of a shack in a slum let alone a family of 5. Most of us now spend the day waiting for a Good Samaritan to drop by with a bag of food; when food is available we share it with our neighbours who have none. When there is a rumour that there may be a charitable donation of food from an NGO into the slum that almost makes matters worse as it creates a stampede and all the good work that has been done by social distancing is ruined. Please don’t judge us harshly though because if you and your family haven’t eaten for days it is very difficult to grab the opportunity. On the bad days when there is nothing to be eaten, we just sleep with the hope that tomorrow will be a better day !

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In this most difficult of times with the COVID19 pandemic - the Schools of Hope have been shut down as have all Government Schools in Kenya. The programme will spring back to life as soon as the shut down is relaxed.People in the slums have been instructed to stay at home but for a typically averaage family of 5 in a 3' x 3' schack in a slum this is just not realistic. Additionally most people do not have savings so the idea of not working ultimately means starving. This is the situation in which hundreds of thousands have to exist - this is their reality.

The Supervisors are in communication with ChallengeAid but at this moment in time there is not much that can be done. What does emerge from the situation is the need to get this training back on track as soon as we are able to cascade the learning to the young people who rely on the SoH's to fulfil their aspirations and turn them into a reality.

This is a letter from Kibera regarding the Covid 19 Crisis reflecting life in the Informal Slum Settlement by a resident -

We had all assumed that things would return to normal and that a cure would soon be found for Corona virus but this did not happen. More people lost their jobs and the government placed a 7pm curfew in Nairobi. There was even talk of a lockdown, we were told a lockdown would be an order for all people to stay indoors. We were told this had been done in Europe and South Africa. Then reports reached us that in Europe people were dying by the thousands and it had become even impossible to bury them in a decent manner. It sounded like the end of the world was near. The government even called for a day of national prayer !

Desperate times call for extreme measures, since there was not enough money for feeding the children, jobs were not available in the city and the Corona virus seemed to affect people in Nairobi more. Most families hurriedly organized to send their children and the women to their rural homes but then we were also

told that we would be spreading the disease by doing this. It is an impossible situation.

Most of us who have no rural homes to go to; sit in our houses which are essentially one room shacks of about 10’x10’. It’s almost impossible for one person to spend a whole day inside of a shack in a slum let alone a family of 5. Most of us now spend the day waiting for a Good Samaritan to drop by with a bag of food; when food is available we share it with our neighbours who have none. When there is a rumour that there may be a charitable donation of food from an NGO into the slum that almost makes matters worse as it creates a stampede and all the good work that has been done by social distancing is ruined. Please don’t judge us harshly though because if you and your family haven’t eaten for days it is very difficult to grab the opportunity. On the bad days when there is nothing to be eaten, we just sleep with the hope that tomorrow will be a better day !

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The project has had a slow start for two reasons - we have only just started the project.

                                                                              - the donations have only just begun

The first focus of of our programme will be in Kibera and Mathare both being siuated in Narobi as two of Nairobi's largest Slums and Kibera itself almost certainly Africa's largest slum.

We are just beginning to initiate more sports coaching sessions especially in rugby and cricket working with Kenya rugby & East Africa Cricket and character development Trust.Life skill lectures will also commence next month on child exploitation,substance abuse how that invariably leads to criminal activity in the Slums.

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Organization Information

ChallengeAid

Location: Llandovery, Carmarthenshire - United Kingdom
Website:
Facebook: Facebook Page
Twitter: @ChallengeAid
Project Leader:
Mariella Scott
Llandovery, Carmarthenshire United Kingdom
$70 raised of $64,200 goal
 
2 donations
$64,130 to go
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