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Proudly Pushing the Global Sexual Rights Agenda

by Action Canada for Sexual Health and Rights-- pour la sante et les droit sexuels
Proudly Pushing the Global Sexual Rights Agenda
Proudly Pushing the Global Sexual Rights Agenda
Proudly Pushing the Global Sexual Rights Agenda
Proudly Pushing the Global Sexual Rights Agenda
Proudly Pushing the Global Sexual Rights Agenda
Proudly Pushing the Global Sexual Rights Agenda
Proudly Pushing the Global Sexual Rights Agenda
Proudly Pushing the Global Sexual Rights Agenda
Proudly Pushing the Global Sexual Rights Agenda
Proudly Pushing the Global Sexual Rights Agenda


The SRI is a coalition of organizations from Canada, Poland, India, Egypt, Latin America and Africa, that work together to advance human rights related to sexuality at the United Nations. For more information visit: www.sexualrightsinitiative.com

Action Canada for Sexual Health and Rights is the administrative secretariat or cordinator of the SRI. 

Sexual Rights at HRC37

The 37th session of the UN Human Rights Council will take place from February 26 to March 23, 2018. 

Find information about anticipated sexual rights-related resolutionspanelsand reportsUPR outcomes, and parallel events taking place during the 37th session (including a side event on comprehensive sexuality education hosted with the WHO, UNESCO, and Action Canada SHR).

We are proudly pushing forward the sexual rights agenda! This past month we have opened an office in Geneva to grow capacity to support SRI's strategic and ambitious plans.

Read our full update through the SRI newsletter, here. 

We would love to hear from you. Please feel free to email tara@actioncanadaSHR.org with any questions. 

Links:

Image of Video on CBC with Meghan Doherty
Image of Video on CBC with Meghan Doherty

Included in this summary:

  • A Vision of Reproductive Health – Animated Video of Intersectionality of the Issues
  • 36th Session of the Human Rights Council Summary from September
  • 285 Organizations Sign Joint Statement on Access to Abortion
  • Global Day of Action for Access to Safe and Legal Abortion – Using Human Rights Law to Advance
  • Universal Periodic Review 28 Summary and Country Responses

A Vision of Reproductive Health – Animated Video of Intersectionality of the Issues
CBC worked with SRI Coordinator, Meghan Doherty, to progress, and imagines what the future could look like for women’s health in the next 20 years
http://www.cbc.ca/2017/canadais/reproductive-rights-yesterday-today-and-tomorrow-1.4397108

36th Session of the Human Rights Council Summary - September 2017

In September the Human Rights Council held Session 36 – We have a full report in our newsletter here

Sexual rights related resolutions at HRC included:

The question of the death penalty - This is the first UN resolution explicitly referencing adultery at either the Human Rights Council or the General Assembly.

The resolution condemns the imposition of the death penalty as a sanction for specific forms of conduct, such as apostasy, blasphemy, adultery and consensual same-sex relations, and expressing serious concern that the application of the death penalty for adultery is disproportionately imposed on women. The resolution further deplores the fact that, frequently, poor and economically vulnerable persons and foreign nationals are disproportionately subjected to the death penalty, that laws carrying the death penalty are used against persons exercising their rights to freedom of expression, thought, conscience, religion, and peaceful assembly and association, and that persons belonging to religious or ethnic minorities are disproportionately represented among those sentenced to the death penalty.
The resolution urges States that have not yet abolished the death penalty to ensure that it is not imposed as a sanction for specific forms of conduct such as apostasy, blasphemy, adultery and consensual same-sex relations, calls upon States to undertake further studies to identify the underlying factors that contribute to the substantial racial and ethnic bias in the application of the death penalty, calls upon States to make available disaggregated information on the application of the death penalty and decides that the high-level panel discussion on the topic at the 40th session (March 2019) will address the human rights violations related to the use of the death penalty, in particular with respect to the rights to non- discrimination and equality.
Of particular note is the USA’s vote against this resolution, despite its strong support for previous resolutions condemning violence and discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation and gender identity. Furthermore, States that previously voted against the most recent resolution on sexual orientation and gender identity, voted in favour of this resolution, including Congo, Cote d’Ivoire, Kyrgyzstan, and Togo.
Egypt, Russia and Saudi Arabia put forward 9 hostile amendments to the resolution, including two sovereignty amendments which would have considerably weakened the text. All amendments were rejected.

The full enjoyment of human rights by all women and girls and the systematic mainstreaming of a gender perspective into the implementation of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development

From rhetoric to reality: a global call for concrete action against racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance. Panel discussion on the impact of multiple and intersecting forms of discrimination and violence in the context of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance on the full enjoyment of all human rights by women and girls can be viewed here.

Mental Health and Human Rights – adopted by consensus. the resolution expresses concern at the marginalization of mental health within health policies, budgets, in medical education, research and practice, and pays particular attention to the mental health rights of migrants, refugees, women, girls, people living with HIV and members of key populations. The resolution underscores that States should ensure that persons with mental health conditions or psychosocial disabilities have access to a range of support services that are based on respect for human rights in order to live independently, be included in the community, exercise their autonomy and agency, participate meaningfully in and decide upon all matters affecting them and have their dignity respected, on an equal basis with others. The resolution further encourages States to support persons with mental health conditions or psychosocial disabilities to empower themselves in order to know and demand their rights, including through health and human rights literacy, to provide human rights education and training for health workers, police, law enforcement officers, prison staff and other relevant professions, with a special focus on non-discrimination, free and informed consent and respect for the will and preferences of all, and confidentiality and privacy. The resolution Requests the High Commissioner to organize a consultation during the 71st session of the World Health Assembly, to discuss all the relevant issues and challenges pertaining to the fulfillment of a human rights perspective in mental health.
For a complete list of statements and resolutions and other highlights of the 36th Human Rights Council visit here: http://www.sexualrightsinitiative.com/2017/hrc/hrc36-srhr-highlights/

International Day for Decriminalization of Abortion brought 285 organizations from around the world to create a joint statement, included in English below. To see footage and partners on this statement visit here. (http://www.sexualrightsinitiative.com/2017/hrc/joint-statement-on-access-to-safe-and-legal-abortion-globally/)

Mr. President,
It is my honour to deliver this statement on behalf of 285 organisations from around the world.
Through the Vienna Declaration and Programme of Action, States explicitly agreed to prioritize the human rights of women, including the eradication of gender-based discrimination and violence. However, many States have not yet made the important decision that women’s human rights deserve to be upheld and their lives are worth saving. The continued criminalization of abortion and restrictions on access to and provision of abortion and post-abortion care in many jurisdictions is stark evidence of this.
Around 22 million unsafe abortions are estimated to take place around the world annually[ii], leading to 7 million health complications[iii] and 47,000 deaths[iv]. In addition, there are major social and financial costs to women and girls, families, communities, health systems and economies. The criminalization of abortion and failure to ensure access to quality abortion services is a violation of the rights to non-discrimination, to privacy, and to make decisions about one’s own body, and can constitute torture or ill-treatment, as repeatedly highlighted by UN bodies and experts.[v] Prohibiting abortion pushes it underground and gives rise to unsafe abortions, violating the rights to life, health and bodily autonomy. Moreover, the poor and those already facing multiple and intersecting forms of discrimination are disproportionately affected, making the global community’s pledge to “leave no one behind” ring hollow.
These human rights violations must stop now. On September 28, the Global Day of Action for Access to Safe and Legal Abortion, we urge the Human Rights Council to address the human rights violations arising from criminalization of abortion and the denial of access to safe and legal abortion services through its resolutions, decisions, dialogues, debates, and the UPR. We demand in a collective voice that governments across the world respect, protect and fulfill the right to access safe and legal abortion services and post-abortion care.
Thank you, Mr. President.

The Sexual Rights Initiative organized a side-event about using human rights law and standards to advance the right to access safe and legal abortion. In support of the September 28 Global Day of Action for Access to Safe and Legal Abortion, the Sexual Rights Initiative organised a panel highlighting the ways in which States, civil society, the UN system, and others can use human rights law and standards to advance the right to access safe and legal abortion. It is intended that this exchange of practices and experiences will inspire further action and collaboration among States, development partners, and civil society towards realizing abortion related rights for all.


The Sexual Rights Initiative would like to thank the 286 NGOs who signed the joint statement marking the September 28 Global Day of Action for Access to Safe and Legal Abortion. This was the first mass joint statement on abortion rights at the Human Rights Council. Click here for the statement and video.

 


The 28th session of the Universal Periodic Review (UPR) was held at the UN Human Rights Council, in Geneva, from 6-17 November 2017.
Fourteen countries were reviewed during UPR28: Argentina, Benin, Czechia, Gabon, Ghana, Guatemala, Japan, Pakistan, Peru, Republic of Korea, Sri Lanka, Switzerland, Ukraine, and Zambia.
The Sexual Rights Initiative (SRI) collaborated with national NGOs in six of the countries reviewed to prepare seven stakeholder submissions and advocate for strong recommendations on sexual and reproductive rights. They include:
• Argentina: SRI, OTRANS Argentina, Convocatoria Federal Trans y Travesti de Argentina, Akahatá – Equipo de Sexualidades y Géneros y la Iniciativa por los Derechos Sexuales.
• Argentina: SRI, Akahatá-Equipo de Trabajo en Sexualidades y Géneros
• Benin: SRI, Avec l’appui de la Coalition Africaine des lesbiennes (CAL), Soumission conjointe de l’Association de Femme pour une Relève Orientée (AFRO-BENIN)
• Ghana: SRI, Sisters of the Heart, Centre for Popular Education Human Rights in Ghana (CEPEHRG)
• Guatemala: SRI, La Colectiva Mujeres, Derechos Sexuales
• Pakistan: SRI, Rahnuma Family Planning Association of Pakistan, Right Here Right Now Platform
• Zambia: SRI, Engender Rights Centre for Justice, Friends of Rainka, Generation Alive, TransBantu Zambia, The Lotus Identity and Women’s Alliance for Equality, Coalition of African Lesbians
For more highlights of the UPR28 review please click here. (http://www.sexualrightsinitiative.com/2017/upr/3103/)

Links:

Thank you for supporting this life saving work! 

We CONTINUE proudly pushing forward the agenda at the United Nations to uphold and defend human rights relating to sexuality, gender, and reproduction. Also known as sexual rights. In the most recent session at the Human Rights Council we saw many resolutions relating to sexual health and rights - and we saw some major progress! 

A reminder about what we are working on:The Sexual Rights Initiative (SRI) is a coalition of organizations from all regions of the world with an office in Geneva that has been advocating for the advancement of human rights in relation to gender and sexuality at the UN Human Rights Council since 2006. The SRI works in partnership with local, national and regional organizations and networks of sexual and reproductive health and rights activists to advocate for the inclusion of sexual rights dimensions in: Human Rights Council resolutions, debates, panels and side-events, Special Procedures, Studies and reports prepared by the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights, Treaty monitoring bodies, Universal Periodic Review.

The SRI is committed to the right of every person to sexual and reproductive health and well-being, bodily integrity, as well as the right to have control over and to make free and informed decisions on all matters related to sexuality, reproduction and gender, free from violence and discrimination.

The SRI regularly engages on a wide variety of sexual rights issues, particularly during the Universal Periodic Review, including:

  • Comprehensive rights-based sexuality education
  • Criminalization and other restrictions on safe abortion
  • Discrimination based on sexual orientation
  • Early and forced marriage
  • Empowerment of women and girls
  • HIV/AIDS and human rights
  • Maternal mortality & morbidity
  • Rights of sex workers
  • Rights of transgender and third gender persons
  • Sexual rights of young people
  • Universal access to sexual and reproductive health information, education, supplies and services
  • Violence based on the exercise of one’s sexuality including sex outside of marriage

In June we saw major gains on Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights at the 35th session of the Human Rights Council.

The 35th session of the UN Human Rights Council took place from the 6th to the 23rd of June 2017. The HRC35 Recap provides information on some of the key sexual rights related resolutions and oral statements. All of which the Sexual Rights Initiative (SRI) was engaged with during the session. To read about specific resolutions and the joint statement about the “Major Gains at the 35th Human Rights Council Session”, please read this archive

Links:

HRC34: Sexual Rights Recap

The 34th session of the UN Human Rights Council took place from the 27th of February to the 24th of March 2017. Here is an overview of resolutions, panel, oral statements and side events related to sexual rights that took place during the session. 

The HRC34 Recap provides information on some of the key sexual rights related: 

all of which the Sexual Rights Initiative (SRI) was engaged with during the session. 
 
Sexual Rights-related Resolutions
Rights of the child: protection of the rights of the child in the implementation of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development A/HRC/34/L.25

The Human Rights Council adopted by consensus a resolution on the protection of the rights of the child in the implementation of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. The resolution, led by the EU and GRULAC, aimed to provide a child’s rights lens to the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

The Resolution recognizes the importance of international human rights law to the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and that children are disproportionately affected in complex humanitarian emergencies. In addition, it encourages States to strengthen their capacities to monitor progress and build on existing review mechanisms. It further acknowledges that the 2030 Agenda pledge to leave no one behind involves addressing multiple forms of inequality and discrimination, and provides an opportunity to tackle inequities faced by children especially those who are marginalized or in vulnerable situations.

However, the adopted text does not represent the most advanced human rights standards pertaining to the protection of the rights of the child and falls below the agreement reached in the 2030 Agenda. The resolution fails to incorporate the right to be heard, the right to participate, adolescents’ rights to sexual and reproductive health, and the principle of evolving capacities. The resolution also neglects the particular needs of children with disabilities and LGBTI children and does not recognize that family environments are often sites of violence, especially for girls.
Click here to read the joint statement by the Center for Reproductive Rights, the Sexual Rights Initiative, and Child Rights Connect.

 

Mandate of the Special Rapporteur on the situation of human rights defenders A/HRC/34/L.5

The resolution was adopted without a vote and led by Norway. It calls on States to respect and support the activities of human rights defenders, including women human rights defenders, and that all domestic laws should reflect this view. It strongly urges all States to take concrete steps to create, in law and in practice, a safe and enabling environment in which human rights defenders can operate free from hindrance and insecurity. One Russian amendment sought to remove reference to “women human rights defenders,” it was rejected by vote. The resolution renews the mandate of the Special Rapporteur on Human Rights Defenders for three years.

 The SRI prepared an oral statement addressing the human rights defenders who work on protecting, promoting and advancing human rights related to gender and sexuality. Crimes committed against human rights defenders working on gender and sexuality are widespread but often overlooked and accepted and have the complicity and legitimization of political leaders and governments. The statement calls on States to prevent and reduce the risks that gender and sexuality human rights defenders face.
Click here to read SRI statement.

 

The right to privacy in the digital age A/HRC/34/L.7/Rev.1

The resolution was adopted without a vote and led by Austria, Brazil, Germany, Liechtenstein, Mexico and Switzerland. It reaffirms the human right to privacy protected under existing domestic and international law. The automatic processing of personal data for individual profiling may lead to discrimination or decisions that otherwise have the potential to affect the enjoyment of human rights. Individuals often do not provide their free, explicit and informed consent to the re-use, sale or multiple re-sales of their personal data.

 The resolution notes that violations and abuses of the right to privacy may affect all individuals, including with particular effects on women, as well as children and persons in vulnerable situations, or marginalized groups. In many countries, persons and organizations engaged in promoting and defending human rights and fundamental freedoms frequently face threats and harassment and suffer insecurity as well as unlawful or arbitrary interference with their right to privacy as a result of their activities. 
Click here to read the resolution.

 

Freedom of opinion and expression A/HRC/34/L.27

The resolution was adopted without a vote and led by the United States of America. This resolution welcomes the work of the Special Rapporteur on the promotion and protection of the right to freedom of opinion and expression and urges all States to cooperate fully with and assist the Special Rapporteur in the performance of their tasks, as well as to provide all necessary information. The resolution renews the mandate of the Special Rapporteur on the promotion and protection of the right to freedom of opinion and expression for three years. 
Click here to read the resolution.

 

Birth registration and the right of everyone to recognition everywhere as a person before the law A/HRC/34/L.24

The resolution was adopted without a vote and led by Mexico and Turkey. It recognizes that birth registration and the right to recognition everywhere as a person before the law is closely linked to the realization of all other human rights. Birth registration is an important step to preventing statelessness and provides an official record of existence and recognition. Unregistered individuals may have limited or no access to services and the enjoyment of all the rights to which they are entitled, including rights related to health.

Persons without birth registration are more vulnerable to marginalization, exclusion, discrimination, and violence. The resolution calls on States to identify and remove physical, administrative, procedural and any other barriers that impede access to birth registration, paying due attention barriers relating to poverty, disability, gender, age, adoption processes, nationality, statelessness, displacement, illiteracy and detention contexts, and to persons in vulnerable situations.
Click here to read the resolution.

 

Question of the realization in all countries of economic, social and cultural rights A/HRC/34/L.4/Rev.1

The resolution was adopted without a vote and led by Portugal. It reaffirms the importance of economic, social and cultural rights, the interdependence and indivisibility of all human rights, and the obligations of States enshrined in international conventions.

It takes note of the Secretary General’s report in the context of the Sustainable Development Goals, recognizes the need to collect reliable data to measure progress, urges States to strengthen their efforts in this regard, underlines the importance of effective remedies for violations of economic, cultural and social rights and requests the Secretary-General to continue to prepare and submit to the Human Rights Council an annual report on this topic, with a special focus on the role of economic, social and cultural rights in the transformation towards sustainable and resilient societies.
Click here to read the resolution.

 

Sexual Rights-related Panels & Discussions

 Panel discussion on preventable maternal mortality and morbidity and human rights

This panel discussion generated concrete recommendations to accelerate progress in reducing preventable maternal mortality and morbidity by applying a human rights based approach. As noted by the panelists and several States, such an approach requires the full respect, protection and fulfillment of women’s and girls’ sexual and reproductive rights. Panelists and some States also directly addressed the impact of unsafe abortion on maternal deaths and the need to reform restrictive abortion laws, women’s and girls’ rights to bodily autonomy and the need to pay particular attention to adolescents’ sexual and reproductive health needs and rights.

Video link requires Adobe Flash - https://link.brightcove.com/services/player/bcpid1722935254001/?bctid=5353904620001&autoStart=false&secureConnections=true&width=480&height=270

Click here to read the SRI Statement.

 

Annual full-day meeting on the rights of the child
Theme: Protection of the rights of the child in the implementation of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development

States and panelists emphasized the critical importance of adolescents’ sexual and reproductive rights, that this has been a neglected area in law, policy and international development discourse and that States must step up their efforts to provide comprehensive sexuality education to all children, including adolescents, as a matter of priority.

Video link requires Adobe Flash: https://link.brightcove.com/services/player/bcpid1722935254001/?bctid=5347817494001&autoStart=false&secureConnections=true&width=480&height=270

Click here to read SRI statement.

Annual interactive debate on the rights of persons with disabilities 

Theme: Article 5 of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities regarding equality and non-discrimination

The debate sought to identify good practices in promoting the human rights of persons with disabilities in order to achieve substantive equality and to ensure non-discrimination. It also contributed to raising awareness of the challenges that persons with disabilities continue to face in enjoying their human rights, particularly on accessing reasonable accommodation.

The SRI delivered an oral statement addressing the Special Rapporteur’s report. While the report highlights the importance of support within the family, it fails to recognize the family as primary perpetrators of sexual violence, especially on women and girls with disabilities. While the report addresses access to justice, the assumed lack of legal capacity is a huge barrier for women and girls with disabilities. The statement called on States to shift focus away from protective measures and toward the empowerment, sexual well-being, freedom to express desires and self determination of women and girls with disability.
Click here to read SRI Statement

Interactive Dialogue with the Special Rapporteur in the field of cultural rights

The Special Rapporteur addressed the phenomena of fundamentalism and extremism and their grave impact on the enjoyment of cultural rights. She also elaborated on the trend of some actors to subvert the principle of universality on the grounds of religious exceptionalism as means to violate and suppress the rights of women, girls, LGBT persons and gender non-conforming persons.

She argued that cultural rights can play a key role in combating fundamentalism and extremism and provided a comprehensive set of recommendations to Stat

We are happy to send you this report on our work at the last Universal Periodic Review through the UN and update you on the global solidarity building around the U.S. Global Gag Rule, or Mexico City Policy. 

Action Canada for Sexual Health and Rights is the secretariat of the Sexual Rights Initiative (SRI). The SRI supports and resources human rights defenders in countries around the world working on sexual and reproductive health and rights. Sexual and reprodcutive health and rights include: abortion access, material and child health and morbidity, sex work, contraception, LGBTI+, trans rights, comprehensive sexuality education, laws and policies upholding these rights, etc. You may remember our work on the Laws and Policy Database - this database has been well received. We aim to add many more countries, this requires solid researchers, in country contacts, and translation for each country. Resources this helpful take time and effort and investment. We have linked the Laws and Policies Database here, many countries are included and there are many more to be researched and represented. 

The Sexual Rights Initiative signed a joint statement in support of the 'She Decides' Initiative along with many other civil society organizations around the world applauding the Dutch led She Decides initiative to counterbalance the effect of the Global Gag Rule and encouraged other likeminded governments and allies to join the fight. Hard fought advances on sexual and reproductive rights are at risk due to the critical funding loss faced by many organizations. 

Here are the highlights from the most recent Universal Periodic Review (UPR 26):

Find out which human rights recommendations were accepted, noted or deferred by Haiti, Iceland, Lithuania, Moldova (Republic of), South Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Timor-Leste, Togo, Uganda, Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of), and Zimbabwe during the latest UN Universal Periodic Review.

The 26th session of the Universal Periodic Review (UPR) was held at the UN Human Rights Council, in Geneva, from 31 October-11 November 2016.

Eleven countries were reviewed during UPR26: Togo, Syrian Arab Republic, Venezuela, Iceland, Zimbabwe, Lithuania, Uganda, Timor Leste, Republic of Moldova, Haiti, and South Sudan.

The Sexual Rights Initiative (SRI) collaborated with national NGOs in six of the countries reviewed to prepare nine stakeholder submissions and advocate for strong recommendations on sexual and reproductive rights. They include:

Adoption of UPR Outcomes: September 2016

The UPR outcome for each State reviewed during UPR26 will be adopted at the 34th session of the HRC (March 2017). The outcome report indicates which recommendations the State agrees to implement, and its responses to other recommendations. This is the only opportunity for civil society to make an oral statement during the official UPR process. The SRI, in collaboration with partners and allies, will work to ensure that sexual and reproductive rights are visible during this segment of the UPR process.

The intervening period is an opportunity to engage in dialogue with States on accepting relevant recommendations – and, at the same time, not accepting those recommendations that are inconsistent with human rights norms and standards. It is also a means for gaining the support of media and the general public.

Below are some highlights from each UPR26 review. Click here for the full list of recommendations made related to sexual rights, including State responses to date.

Click here for the full list of UPR26 Sexual Rights Recommendations

Haiti

Accepted Recommendations

  • Intensify its efforts in protecting the rights of women and promote gender equality by revising legal framework, strengthening law enforcement and supporting victims of domestic violence in their legal process, rehabilitation and reintegration (Thailand)
  • Adopt a comprehensive legislative framework concerning violence against women that includes a definition of rape in line with international standards and criminalize marital rape (Belgium)

Noted Recommendations

  • Take measures to combat norms, practices and stereotypes that cause discrimination and violence based on sexual orientation and gender identity (Colombia)

Iceland

Accepted Recommendations

  • Enact legislation that includes protection from discrimination on the basis of intersex status (Australia)
  • Take general measures to eliminate gender stereotypes on the role and obligations of women and men, in particular through awareness-raising campaigns and education (Ecuador)
  • Closely monitor the investigation and prosecution of cases of domestic and sexual violence and their effectiveness, improve access to justice for victims of such violence and provide training in the field of domestic and sexual violence for judges, police, prosecutors and other relevant professionals (Czech Republic)

Lithuania

Deferred Recommendations

  • Adopt measures that guarantee the respect for the rights of LGBTI persons, by investigating and punishing acts of violence and discrimination as well as reviewing all legislation that may affect their rights (Argentina)
  • Redouble efforts to combat gender-based violence by criminalizing marital rape, thoroughly investigating and prosecuting acts of violence against women, and issuing guidelines for and providing training to law enforcement and judicial officials on handling domestic violence cases in all regions (Canada)
  • Take actions to improve sexual and reproductive health and rights according to previous recommendations and formulate a national strategy on sexual and reproductive health and rights, and integrate sexual and reproductive health into the next National Health Programme for 2026-2036 (Finland)
  • Establish and implement integrated strategies for […] unwanted pregnancies among girls and young people (Costa Rica)

Moldova

Accepted Recommendations

  • Ensure the effective implementation and enforcement of existing legislation with a view to reducing structural disadvantages that hamper the effective realisation of substantive gender equality (Slovakia)
  • Duly investigate the crimes of hate and discrimination, among them, the most recent acts committed against the LGBTI community (Uruguay)
  • Continue to develop a policy framework and implement a comprehensive strategy to combat domestic violence that includes education and public awareness for rural areas, strengthened mechanisms to hold offenders to account, and enhanced training for law enforcement officials (Canada)

South Sudan

Accepted Recommendations

  • Strengthen the efforts to prevent discrimination and violence against women and girls, including by eradication of harmful practices such as child, early and forced marriage (Slovenia)

Deferred Recommendations

  • Urgently adopt effective measures to combat sexual violence in the whole territory, to ensure accountability for those responsible of such crimes, and to ensure total redress for victims, by guaranteeing sufficient financial resources to implement such measures (Chile)
  • Repeal penal code provisions that criminalize sexual relations between consenting adults of the same sex (Uruguay)

Syria

Deferred Recommendations

  • Amend the Penal Code and Criminal Code to eliminate mitigated sentences for rapists who marry their victims for so called “honour crimes” (Sierra Leone)
  • Conduct a review of the Personal Status Law and other relevant laws which will remove the provisions discriminatory towards women such as those not granting them guardianship of their children, disabling them from travelling with their children on their own or not allowing them transferring their citizenship to their children (Czechia)
  • Immediately implement Security Council Resolution 1325 and related resolutions on women, peace and security, including by taking special measures to protect women and girls from gender-based violence and to hold perpetrators of such acts accountable (Finland)

Timor Leste

Deferred Recommendations

  • Consider reviewing the provisions in its penal code which contain punitive measures against women who have undergone illegal abortions (Norway)
  • Strengthen the legal framework in order to ensure gender equality and to ban discrimination on the grounds of sexual orientation and gender identity (Chile)
  • Step up efforts to reduce maternal mortality by expanding coverage and quality of health services, goods and facilities focusing on maternal health care (Netherlands)
  • Implement the National Action Plan against sexual and gender-based violence, including by improving access to justice for victims, providing targeted training and capacity-building to law enforcement and judicial officials, and dedicating sufficient resources to enable key ministries to implement the Action Plan and increase coordination (Canada)

Togo

Accepted Recommendations

  • Implement formal and effective prevention and protection mechanisms for women victims of violence and female genital mutilation (Spain)

Noted Recommendations

  • Ensure a safe working environment for human rights defenders, by modifying the legislation that allows the denial of legal registration of organisations specialised in reproductive and sexual rights of women as well as associations defending the rights of LGBTI (Canada)
  • Adopt and implement legislation prohibiting discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation and gender identity, including by decriminalising consensual same-sex sexual conduct (Slovenia)

Uganda

Deferred Recommendations

  • Fully implement the School Health Policies and the Adolescent Health Policy to provide reproductive health education for adolescents and prevent teenager pregnancy (Germany)

Noted Recommendations

  • Take measures to combat rules, practices and stereotypes that cause discrimination and violence against lesbians, gays, bisexuals and transgender persons, particularly those that are an attack against their dignity and self-determination with respect to their sexual orientation  (Colombia)
  • Revise legislation on abortion in order to ensure all women have access to abortion and health-care in order to reduce maternal mortality (Congo)
  • Increase access to sexual and reproductive health services for vulnerable groups, including sexual minorities, by raising the health budget to 15 per cent in line with the Abuja declaration (Netherlands) 

Venezuela

Deferred Recommendations

  • Ensure respect for and protection of LGBTI persons through measures such as the decriminalization of homosexual relations in the armed and security forces, the recognition of same-sex couples and the right to change identity for transgender people (Spain)
  • Adopt a comprehensive program on sexual health and reproductive rights based on human rights and WHO standards and to allocate sufficient resources for its implementation (Belgium)
  • Ensure full and equal access to modern contraceptives throughout its territory, including in peri-urban, rural and indigenous territories (Denmark) 

Zimbabwe

Accepted Recommendations

  • Develop and operationalize a comprehensive strategy on preventing maternal, neonatal and child mortality (Botswana)
  • Set up a strategy to promote the rights of women to combat discrimination against women and girls, focusing in particular on matters such as early or forced marriage, sexual violence, equal access to education and equal access to land ownership, inter alia (Mexico)
  • Amend all statutory and customary laws as soon as possible to establish the minimum age of marriage at 18 years, create and implement a comprehensive national plan of action to combat the practice of child marriage and its root causes (Ireland)

Noted Recommendations

  • Prohibit discrimination against persons because of their real or imputed sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, and ensure adequate protection for LGBTI persons, sex workers, and other marginalized group  (Canada)

Click here for the full list of UPR26 Sexual Rights Recommendations

More info about the UPR

The UPR mechanism of the United Nations Human Rights Council is used

Links:

 

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