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 Education  Haiti Project #17201

Send a Child to School in Haiti for a Year

by Little Footprints, Big Steps - IDO
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Send a Child to School in Haiti for a Year
Send a Child to School in Haiti for a Year
Send a Child to School in Haiti for a Year
Send a Child to School in Haiti for a Year
Send a Child to School in Haiti for a Year
Send a Child to School in Haiti for a Year
Send a Child to School in Haiti for a Year
Send a Child to School in Haiti for a Year
Send a Child to School in Haiti for a Year
Send a Child to School in Haiti for a Year
Send a Child to School in Haiti for a Year
Send a Child to School in Haiti for a Year
Send a Child to School in Haiti for a Year
Send a Child to School in Haiti for a Year
Send a Child to School in Haiti for a Year
Send a Child to School in Haiti for a Year
Send a Child to School in Haiti for a Year
Send a Child to School in Haiti for a Year
Send a Child to School in Haiti for a Year
Send a Child to School in Haiti for a Year
Send a Child to School in Haiti for a Year
Send a Child to School in Haiti for a Year
Send a Child to School in Haiti for a Year
Send a Child to School in Haiti for a Year
Send a Child to School in Haiti for a Year
Schools open once again!
Schools open once again!

 Although COVID-19 hasn't had the horrific impact in Haiti we'd anticipated, our preventative efforts definitely haven't gone to waste! We're continuing to take precautions and to help vulnerable families do the same. Having provided hand-washing stations, hygiene supplies and training to families in rural regions, we are now focusing on helping them with food security. In our Transitional Safehouses, we continue to take preventative measures such as hand-washing and limited access.

Every week, we purchase fresh vegetables, fruits and spices from the local market to use in our Transitional Safehouses. Since COVID-19 reached Haiti, we've been purchasing produce directly from parents who are in our small business program - which helps those parents generate an income during difficult times, while we get fresh organic produce without having to risk sending staff members to the crowded market place!

Local Social Services (IBESR) has started the process of documenting all children living in orphanages in Southern Haiti. This will assist in monitoring the quality of the orphanages, identifying those which urgently need to be closed, gathering data to facilitate future reunification of those children, and preventing trafficking. LFBS had committed to assisting with logistics in this endeavor, as we did previously in 2017/18.

As we began the documentation process, authorities discovered several new centres that had formed illegally after the 2018 law banning new orphanages in Haiti. They also discovered several orphanages that were so severely neglectful they needed to be shut down – immediately. LFBS assisted IBESR in emergency closures of two small orphanages. Fourteen of these children were placed in foster families. With your support, LFBS has been able to support them with medical care and other needs while their biological families are being traced. Nine children were placed in the LFBS Transitional Safehouses, and most have quickly been reunited with their biological families. THANK YOU for helping us ensure children are able to remain with their families.

With the closure of corrupt orphanages, there is an even greater need for local foster families when local authorities are unable to find children's biological families. These foster families are willing to take in children and care for them as their own - with no support promised by the government. Some of the children placed in foster families are severely handicapped, or are very young babies born in difficult circumstances (such as one 2 month old baby born in the local prison, whose mother has not yet been released). With your support, we can strengthen Haiti's foster family system - allowing separated children to be cared for in a family environment instead of in institutions. LFBS regularly follows up with foster families to make sure that the children's needs are being met. Many of the babies in foster care require support for baby formula and medical care. YOUR support allows us to continue to assist the local foster families during this difficult and critical time.

While Universities were closed due to COVID-19, our most advanced Agronomy student worked part-time with our team. This diligent student, and our Outreach staff, travelled to families to review the land they have available for gardening to ensure sustainable food security. Sometimes this meant several hours of hiking through mountains! We're so proud of our team and this young man for truly walking in the steps of vulnerable families in order to understand their reality, so that the support we provide will truly make a difference. Good work, team LFBS!

On August 17, many schools opened again in Haiti, trying to salvage the 2019/20 school year. Along with closures for COVID19 in March, schools were forces to close due to political unrest in the fall of 2019. We were able to continue private tutoring for children in our Transitional Safehouses and for some children who live with their families. Students are so excited and hopeful that they will be able to continue their education. Thank you for making that a possibility.

The local Civil Protection Unit provided hands-on training for the LFBS staff. The instruction and practice of the safe use of fire extinguishers and how to perform CPR on adults and children took place on the open area of the LFBS land under construction.

Further progress has been made on Phase 1 of the LFBS land development project! The septic field has been completed and the security gates have been completed and installed. Some of the crops planted on Phase 2 portion of the land have been harvested and will be used in the Transitional Safehouses as well as for distribution to families in our Outreach program.

We hope found this glimpse into just some of the activities that your interest, caring and support have made possible over the past three months – please with your friends, family and colleagues. Together we can continue to save, change and build lives and futures.

Produce from our local families!
Produce from our local families!
Children rescued from corrupt orphanage
Children rescued from corrupt orphanage
Agronomy student and LFBS staff
Agronomy student and LFBS staff
Staff CPR training
Staff CPR training
Septic Field Phase 1 complete!
Septic Field Phase 1 complete!

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Education in Safehouses continue
Education in Safehouses continue

Responding to the realities of life in Haiti – the extreme poverty, malnutrition, lack of opportunity for education and medical care, slavery, homelessness – has become more complex with COVID19 and continued escalation of inflation. Like others world-wide, our core programs have refocused. Ensuring health awareness, food supply, Haitian staff well-being, and concentration on what will be needed and what we CAN DO – thanks to your continued support.

With a sigh of relief, our Head of Operations looks out over the land Little Footprints Big Steps has planted crops on near Les Cayes, Haiti. Last night’s rainfall was exactly what was needed to finish sowing the seeds that will soon provide peanuts, corn and plantains to distribute to vulnerable families. 

Back in the office, we are taking advantage of this time to reinforce our team's capacity and effectiveness. A highly respected Haitian Child Protection Consultant with extensive experience and expertise has developed a training specifically for our staff. Two days a week, she works with our staff to teach and discuss modules related to Child Protection - Child Rights, Child Development, Child Protection System, Case Management, Juvenile Delinquency, Justice of Minors, Psycho-Social Support of Children. The staff will also be using this time to review and update all beneficiary files. A part-time Social Worker will be added to the staff to work witih them on the plans toward self-sufficiency specific to each family.

We are grateful that the children in our Safehouses are able to continue with their education despite schools being closed  - thanks to your support, live-in tutors (to minimize COVD19 spread) continue to work with the children currently in our Safehouses. Even as we undertake precautions to protect physical health, it's important to look after mental health as well! Those in our Transitional Safehouses - as well as their guard dogs - have enjoyed some refreshing trips to the beach after study sessions with their tutor.

While Universities have closed due to COVID-19, we've taken the opportunity to hire our most advanced Agronomy student part-time! A welcome addition to our Outreach team, our Agronomist-in-training meets with each family during the team's rural visits to discover their experience, challenges, and potential and when it comes to planting food crops to increase nutritional food security options for them and their community. He then develops an individualized plan for each family. Considering the frightening inflation and economic crisis Haiti has endured starting during last year's political unrest and continuing into this year's pandemic, we believe it's important to focus on sustainable food security options for these families, instead of keeping them reliant on food donations.

As much as possible, while keeping our Haitian staff safe, we continue regular connection with the vulnerable children and families in both local and remote areas is key to keep their capacity - and hope - developing. Before heading our, our team makes washing stations out of buckets and puts together hygiene kits and core food supplies to distribute. During the visits, they update file notes on the well-being of the children, activities the family is involved with and the progress of those involved in our Small Business program. Our nurse provides training about COVID-19, preventative measures families should take, and proper hand-washing techniques.

Thank you for your continued care and support as we focus on and strengthen the areas that we CAN DO. The number of lives you save and change continues to grow each day. Thank you for continuing to stand with us. 

Informative article about impacts of COVID19 in Haiti: http://haitianalysis.com/2020/03/31/haiti-on-the-precipice-of-coronavirus/?fbclid=IwAR1-YbSjLDBevOGEierxpm9KuToajTNdrortTNKNFx5fLp-AexXuKcZ3vq0

Link to LFBS Annual Report:  https://static1.squarespace.com/static/5cf7ecc4996d630001ae475a/t/5e9782ffcf33283db1d96086/1586987780786/LFBS_annual_2019.pdf

Core food supplies to vulnerable
Core food supplies to vulnerable
LFBS staff making washing stations
LFBS staff making washing stations
Agronomy student working with families
Agronomy student working with families
LFBS Nurse providing instruction
LFBS Nurse providing instruction

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School supplies distributed
School supplies distributed

After several months of incredible stress due to violent protests and instability, students in Les Cayes area were finally been able to return to school in early December! We are so grateful that they finally have a sense of normalcy, and the opportunity to learn, creating hope for a better future. However, the economic impact of the humanitarian crisis is still being felt, and insecurity levels are still very high. Many schools will be having classes on Saturdays to make up for the months of school missed.

During the week before Christmas, in collaboration with Haitian Social Services (IBESR), the LFBS Outreach Team was able to:

-reunite 3 girls with their families! All of them had been in situations of mistreatment and domestic labour before coming to our Transitional Safehouse.
-reunite 2 boys who had been separated from their families;
-have employees briefed on the documentation process of children/youth in prison, and discuss the process of reunification of children in conflict with the law;
-distribute hygiene kits to nearly 40 youth in the children’s cell of the prison, and begin a dialogue with them to motivate them to make some changes in their lives;
-transfer 2 babies who had been abandoned in a hospital located several hours away, into foster families (although the trip to pick up these babies ended up taking nearly 12 hours due to road blocks and protests).
-bring 2 boys with bullet wounds to the hospital for bandaging, twice per week for each child.
-add to the Business Program for 5 parents who have been managing their businesses well, and integrate one new parent into the Business Start-up Program!... and that’s only part of what our small but dedicated team accomplished this week in collaboration with local authorities! In early 2020, we will follow-up with the newly reunited children to ensure they have access to education and potentially to integrate their parents in our Business Start-up Program.

Family structures are important – by strengthening families and empowering parents to care for their children, you are also empowering children…to be children and strive for the future. Please don’t underestimate the importance of community development, family preservation and family strengthening! Helping vulnerable families stay together and become more sustainable impacts their children’s mentality, life choices, self-perception, social engagement, and futures.

While the construction work continues on Phase 1 LFBS Land Development project, crops planted on Phase 2 area yield a nice corn harvest! The agronomy students planned out the crop planting and we hired some of the families we work with to do the planting and maintenance! The harvest of the corn and peanuts will provide nutritious food for use at the Transitional Safehouses and nearby outreach families.

In early January, our staff facilitated an STI training for the children in the local prison, and provided the youth with a nutritious meal. There are over 30 children currently in the local prison, and all of them are in need of medical attention. Together with local authorities, we document each of the children with psychological, academic, and medical evaluations, and gather information about their families. Eventually we hope to trace their families and begin working towards a more successful reunification once they are liberated. We also hope to provide medical care to those who need it, although considering the conditions they are living in it will be difficult for them to be healthy while in prison. With your support, we would like to provide a meal for the children each day we spend with them as they are clearly not well fed in the prison, especially following the prolonged crisis the country recently endured and the resulting inflation.

One Hundred For Haiti Organization provided funds for mental health group counseling sessions for our remarkable staff. LFBS Protection workers are involved with many difficult situations year round, and have been personally and emotionally affected by the political and social unrest in Haiti over the last year, and needed to have their own feelings heard and processed. Development, rather than simply offering relief, means helping people help others. It grows from there. Taking care of our staff, who so dedicatedly care for others, is tremendously important.

Sharing information about the critical development aid issues, and the work being done by LFBS and our partners, having the chance for in-person discussions, meetings and connecting with people of all ages, and having LFBS Haitian staff there to share the stories and culture, is another important part of the mandate to increase awareness, understanding and capacity. LFBS Founder/Head of Operations and two Haitian staff traveled to Canada in January. While in Whitehorse, Toronto and Montreal, they met with students in schools, Universities, Sunday Schools; Service Club members; architects, Senator, Member of Parliament, and Board Directors; they presented and had discussions at community events, fundraisers, and at a Concordia University special event.

Examples of determination and tenacity … from Haiti to the Arctic! Nicolas has been a key employee with LFBS since 2013. While continuing his very demanding work with LFBS, studying and going to classes after a full work day, being a caring husband and father to two sons, he models leadership and motivation as he has graduates from Law School!

While far away in the frozen arctic, Dr. Russ Reinbolt, ER doctor from a San Diego hospital, undertakes the coldest and toughest Ultra Marathon in the world! During this grueling 300miles/483km run in temperatures as low as -37C, he has chosen to champion Little Footprints Big Steps Child Protection Organization! A documentary is being made of his training and run and he hopes that additional awareness will be brought to LFBS work.

Thank YOU for being the catalysts for the continued empowerment and opportunities for lasting change that you bring to so many!

Eager and Ready to go!
Eager and Ready to go!
LFBS Medical and Outreach Staff at Youth Prison
LFBS Medical and Outreach Staff at Youth Prison
Sharing at Rotary Clubs
Sharing at Rotary Clubs
Crops planted on Phase 2
Crops planted on Phase 2
Law School Graduation for LFBS staff member!
Law School Graduation for LFBS staff member!

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Sharing at World Summit in England
Sharing at World Summit in England

As you hear reports about the current situation in Haiti today, it’s important to remember that the massive unrest in the streets is not powered by emotion only. The people you see out there are not thoughtless and they’re not simply angry. There is a logic to what’s happening; there’s a history and so many reasons why. There is need and desperation, definitely. But implicit in what’s happening is a rejection of a long-standing system—and a dream of what another Haiti could look like. And, DID look like!

Once known as the ‘Pearl of the Caribbean’, sadly, for many decades Haiti has become known as the ‘poorest country in the Western Hemisphere’.

Remember, Haiti has always been a leader in seismic shifts in how the world functions. Their revolution of 1791–1804 that ensured that slave capitalism would eventually be doomed all over the planet. They became the first black republic in the world. They were the 'Pearl of the Caribbean', a thriving free country. They eventually ended up almost being taken over but chose to buy back their own freedom from France for the sum of (today's funds) $21 BILLION. This was to cover the cost of the income generated by the slaves and the properties the whites were relinquishing back to the Haitians. It took Haiti 122 years to pay this debt - but they did it!

In 1929, they became the first nation to cast off an American military occupation. Besides frustration about infinite corruption and zero leadership in Haiti, there is a lot of thinking now about how the country might survive outside globalized markets, and how it could return to an agricultural system of updated, self-sufficient small farming. Changes like these take a long time to accomplish, and require the support of huge majorities willing to work for these goals and other changes. It’s a demanding job, to tire out an enemy who has every advantage. But it can be done—and has been done before in Haiti. 

Over the past several months there has been no electricity, no fuel, no access to food, water, supplies. Schools, businesses, markets, even hospitals have closed down. Red Cross has temporarily closed down locations outside of the capital city (Port au Prince). Terres des Hommes Organization will be leaving Haiti at the end of the year. Inflation has quadrupled the cost of even the most basic survival items. Most of the country is on lock down or rioting. In a country where the majority of people feed their families with the income generated from day to day market selling, this instability causes even more suffering.

DESPITE THIS, your Little Footprints Big Steps team has continued doing all that we can: in collaboration with local authorities we continue to reunite children. Our staff have ensured that school supplies are ready to go for our students as soon as school opens up again. Backpacks provided by Move to Matter have been distributed where possible. On a day when the entire country was on lockdown, our nurse travelled by foot across fire-lit road blocks to ensure that a young man could have medical attention. Another day several children were accompanied to a medical clinic including two with broken bones; we were able to make a trip to visit to some of the families in the countryside to bring them food supplies and ensure their children are ready for school (school is open in the countryside!); construction on our property was able to continue. We have temporarily moved several children from extremely dangerous areas of town into our Transitional Safehouses. Daily tutoring sessions are taking place at the Transitional Safehouses. As much as possible, LFBS staff continue to heroically work, despite the danger, difficulties and heavy rains. On calm days we have been able to purchase supplies for our Transitional Safehouses and Outreach families. The level of commitment of the LFBS staff is remarkable!

What else can we do? We focus on doing all that we can do now, while planning for what we will do as soon as we are able. Please don’t look at the current crisis in Haiti and write off the country as incapable of progress. Instead look at the faces of the children, parents and staff wishing for hope, working for positive change, and praying for peace in their country. We can’t give up on the future. We can’t give up on all of the parents who’ve worked endlessly with the single goal of providing for their families. We can’t give up on the staff members who leave their own families and risk their own lives to come to work even if given the day off, because they so badly want their country to continue moving forward. Right now is when they need us most. They are people just like you, but living in a seemingly impossible situation, and never giving up hope. When the situation becomes more challenging, it means we need to try harder, do better, and become stronger. 

We are SO proud of Little Footprints, Big Steps’ continuous, unrelenting response and enthusiastic dedication. Heros, each and every one....as are all of you that are catalysts for the continued good work and positive impacts... that ARE possible despite this situation. YOU make a difference. In the staff meetings, they think of your care and love and concern. YOU help them stand with compassion and strength, to face each new adversity, to plan for the next steps and to share joys and hopes.

What else do you make possible? On most days, sounds of rioting and gun fire can be heard. On one of those days, Haiti Social Services called us about a 15 year old who had 8 bullets pass through his legs. They requested LFBS assistance. His family could not afford the necessary surgery, medicine, IV fluids, bandaging – or even the food and water.

Here is the account from LFBS’ Head of Haiti Operations when she entered the hospital that was still marginally open: “I could immediately identify the patient. He was a small boy for his age, laying on a hospital bed with both of his legs completely bandaged and spread in front of him. A small, elderly woman sat beside his bed. I’d thought it was his mother but through conversation discovered that it was his grandmother – his mother was out trying to generate an income for the day so she could bring him a meal. 

“What does your mother do?” I asked the boy. “She sells boiled eggs,” he said as tears welled in his eyes and the teenager started to cry. I struggled to hold back my own tears as I slowly held his hand. It is a fairly common business to sell bananas and boiled eggs each morning – yet not something that generates a lot of income. It was about 1pm when I visited him and he hadn’t eaten yet.

He explained to me how he’d been shot: he was working on a public vehicle, recruiting passengers. He was doing this so that he could help his mother pay rent. As the vehicle was returning to Les Cayes, they came across a road block. The driver tried to cross the road block. People who had set up the road block angrily began shooting – and the 15 year old boy, who had gotten off of the truck and was standing on the side of the road, ended up with 8 bullets passing through his legs. The driver dropped him off at the hospital and somehow his mother was informed that he was there.

Yellow liquid seeped through the bandaging on his legs. One leg had received 6 bullets while the other had been hit by 2 bullets. Although he felt pain in both legs, he couldn’t move his toes on the leg that had been more badly damaged.

“Do you feel afraid?” I asked the boy. He nodded. He described having nightmares, and waking up afraid on his hospital bed. His mother can’t even stay at the hospital with him as what she earns during the day is what allows her to feed him. He told me that once he heals, he wants to go live with his father in the countryside – he was so scarred that he didn’t want to live in the city any longer.

Working with Haiti Social Services (IBESR), we will try to ensure that this child gets the medical care, nutrition and support that he needs – however with Red Cross closed, blood transfusions are not even available. We will also try to ensure he receives psychological support and assistance to empower them in the long run.”

In the midst of these challenging times, an amazing milestone event! Eluxon is currently a valued and dedicated employee of the LFBS team. But, in 2011, he was one of the youth we supported in escaping life in a corrupt orphanage which denied him of many of his rights throughout 12 years of his childhood! Eluxon’s work now involves reuniting families and working with other children/youth from similar situations. In October, he traveled to London, England with LUMOS Organization to participate in the One Young World Summit. He spoke, on stage, about the damage orphanages do. We are SO incredibly proud of him and grateful he is being empowered to share his story! The One Young World Summit focused on ending corrupt orphanages, and the volunteering that further damages children around the world. Here he is on stage beside LUMOS founder and Harrry Potter series author, JK Rowling!

Please continue to look past the chaos and violence highlighted in the news or images of Haiti, and see the vulnerable individuals who are being so deeply impacted by their country’s situation as they struggle to meet their families’ basic needs from day to day. We can make a life-changing difference for them, and now they need support more than ever. Thank you for all you make possible! 
 

Reunited after 12 years!
Reunited after 12 years!
School backpacks are distributed
School backpacks are distributed
Construction project continues
Construction project continues
Homeschooling during lockdown
Homeschooling during lockdown

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Sewing class underway
Sewing class underway

AS you have seen in each activity Update - and on our Facebook page (Little Footprints, Big Steps) if you also follow us there - our staff, our Programs, the challenges and the stunning developments are always in motion. Momentum through the strength and support you are such a huge part of. Summer of 2019 has been no exception. Although school is out, learning continues. Each day – and often night – filled with little footprints that lead toward the big steps!

IN JULY, one of the former street youth, Wathson, was recognized for his continued diligence. Who is this young man? He is an enthusiastic, dedicated young man who works hard to improve his living conditions. He is the only child in a single-parent family. His mother has passed away and he lives with his elderly dad. Although he was only able to start school a few years ago when LFBS entered his life, he is now in 9th grade. Since the first day we provided him with the opportunity for education, Watson has succeeded in his school work and exams, despite the fact that he has to walk more than 2 kilometers, down a mountainside for part of the way, to get to his school. He has also taken vocational training in window installation and is currently studying tailoring. He tends to his garden crops in his small mountainous community and is a great vetivert grower. The LFBS staff member guiding the Youth Leader group is creating a contract with each youth moving them toward a more independence and personal accountability.

EARLY in the summer months we started having school uniforms made for the coming school year! We have 4 students in vocational sewing classes this summer. When we are able to purchase sewing machines, we will be able to hire our own youth and family members to make school uniforms in future and add that into the Small Business Program! Other youth are attending vocational training and apprenticeships, including learning masonry work and photography/videography – future LFBS activity Updates will include photos that young man has taken! We were able to hire some of our youth and family during summer construction projects including the Phase 1 security wall on our land and house building for one of youth and his family.

SUMMERTIME learning opportunities also included taking a number of Agronomy students and LFBS youth leaders to the Haven Foundation’s Agriculture Training Center. A wonderful opportunity to learn and be inspired! The agronomy students we are assisting with their University courses are creating a plan for the planting and harvesting of crops on the LFBS land that is not under construction. They will be implementing the plan and looking after the crops. Work experience and continued growth in action!

MEDICAL care is a critical, basic need. July was a busy month for surgeries. In just a few weeks time, over 6 children had surgery – including a child with multiple physical handicaps one having a bullet removed! Our 3 medical students are back in Les Cayes for the summer and are assisting LFBS at the hospital. 

THANKS to you, many of the younger children were able to attend summer school camps and participate in recreation, music, arts and crafts. English tutoring sessions continued throughout the summer, as well as specialized tutoring for the youth who were just reunited with their families and will be attending school in September...for the FIRST TIME! 

BECAUSE of your support, hundreds of children are looking forward to a new school year following the summer break. For LFBS, the preparations for the new school year begin early summer! School uniforms to be made; shoes/socks/undies, backpacks and school supplies to be purchased, sorted and distributed to children in 24 communities throughout Haiti's southwest. 

CHILDREN belong with family, not in institutions. Over 700 orphanages in Haiti have been identified as abusive/neglectful. It is tremendously important the people understand what their donations are actually supporting! This past month, LFBS had a critical role, working with local authorities on a situation with an extremely neglectful orphanage. When this horrific situation was uncovered, there were originally 83 children. Yet, when judicial authorities visited the orphanage just a few days later, there were only 71 children present. The orphanage representative could not provide any explanation regarding where the missing children were. The orphanage, Ofelina Bon Berger de Cavaillon, is directed by Pastor Saint Germain and has just 45 metal beds with no mattresses, no blankets - children of all ages slept on the floor. There are no files for the children. This is the 4th orphanage run by El Shadai Ministries that the authorities have identified as being well below minimum standards. PLEASE encourage friends to be vigilant about where their donations are going! IBESR (Haitian Social Services) and LFBS work to trace the families of these children and provide care, facilitating positive family reunification. LFBS Outreach staff will follow up with the families and children and assess their situations. YOUR continued support makes our critical, humane, work possible, and means that, with opportunities for education, the cycle of poverty that is the catalyst for these horrors, will diminish. 

TO FOSTER more independence and reinforce parental accountability, we have begun implementing new assistance parameters with some of our families who are progressing well with their various businesses.Families staying together, communities strengthening, children having educational opportunities, self-sufficiency becoming a reality. Empowerment programs that work. Thanks to you.  

Please share this Report update with your friends and let us know if you have any questions. THANK YOU SO MUCH for all that you make possible. “Sometimes the right path is not the easiest one”. Thank you for being a catalyst in this journey of challenge, discovery and transformation. 

Students learning Agronomy
Students learning Agronomy
Summertime tutoring
Summertime tutoring
School books ready for distribution
School books ready for distribution
Corrupt Orphanages
Corrupt Orphanages
Youth Are Development
Youth Are Development

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Organization Information

Little Footprints, Big Steps - IDO

Location: Whitehorse, Yukon - Canada
Website:
Facebook: Facebook Page
Twitter: @Little Footprints, Big Steps
Project Leader:
Karen Wienberg
Whitehorse, Yukon Canada
$66,428 raised of $90,000 goal
 
1,014 donations
$23,572 to go
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