Help Local Leaders Save the Mesoamerican Reef

by Fondo Mexicano para la Conservacion de la Naturaleza, A.C. Vetted since 2011 Top Ranked Effective Nonprofit Site Visit Verified
Help Local Leaders Save the Mesoamerican Reef
Help Local Leaders Save the Mesoamerican Reef
Help Local Leaders Save the Mesoamerican Reef
Help Local Leaders Save the Mesoamerican Reef
Help Local Leaders Save the Mesoamerican Reef
Help Local Leaders Save the Mesoamerican Reef
Help Local Leaders Save the Mesoamerican Reef
Help Local Leaders Save the Mesoamerican Reef
Help Local Leaders Save the Mesoamerican Reef
Help Local Leaders Save the Mesoamerican Reef
Help Local Leaders Save the Mesoamerican Reef
Help Local Leaders Save the Mesoamerican Reef
Help Local Leaders Save the Mesoamerican Reef
Help Local Leaders Save the Mesoamerican Reef
Help Local Leaders Save the Mesoamerican Reef
Help Local Leaders Save the Mesoamerican Reef
Help Local Leaders Save the Mesoamerican Reef
Help Local Leaders Save the Mesoamerican Reef
Help Local Leaders Save the Mesoamerican Reef
Help Local Leaders Save the Mesoamerican Reef
Help Local Leaders Save the Mesoamerican Reef
Help Local Leaders Save the Mesoamerican Reef
Help Local Leaders Save the Mesoamerican Reef
Help Local Leaders Save the Mesoamerican Reef
Help Local Leaders Save the Mesoamerican Reef
Help Local Leaders Save the Mesoamerican Reef
Help Local Leaders Save the Mesoamerican Reef
Help Local Leaders Save the Mesoamerican Reef
Help Local Leaders Save the Mesoamerican Reef
Marine and Coastal Conservation Exchange (MCCE)
Marine and Coastal Conservation Exchange (MCCE)

 

Cabo Pulmo, in the state of Baja California Sur, is an outstanding example of community-led conservation success. It serves as a proof of concept that can be replicated in the MAR region. It represents an innovative, non-extractive model for the Blue Economy1. This success is attributed, among other things, to the policy adopted 24 years ago by the federal government and the Cabo Pulmo community to conserve its marine resources under a Natural Protected Area in the category of National Park. The community collectively put its fishing gear down and was able to build an alternative livelihood. Its inhabitants found in sustainable tourism an advantageous livelihood alternative. Cabo Pulmo National Park is nationally and internationally recognized for the biomass increase of wildlife concerning that existing before its decree. “It is clear that the people of Cabo Pulmo’s desire for sustainability and conservation spawned a thriving ecosystem and economy, instilling a deeply rooted sense of pride and responsibility for the marine world in the community”.
On the other hand, the Mesoamerican Reef (MAR), the largest cross bordering barrier reef in the world and one of the wealthiest and most diverse ecosystems, has accomplished significant advances to promote a Blue Economy that guarantees a permanent natural capital for the sustainable development of coastal communities. International and local organizations in Mexico, Guatemala, and Honduras committed to the conversation of the MAR continually face threats such as coastal development, overfishing, terrestrial contamination, and climate change. Nevertheless, they have aligned their visions to create a Blue Economy development model adopting a systemic focus to canalize resources to the region and safeguard its natural capital.
Through the Mesoamerican Reef Leadership Program by the Mexican Fund for the Conservation of Nature, along with its allies, MARFund, LegacyWorks Group, Lindblad Expeditions, and Overbrook Foundation are developing essential initiatives to achieve sustainability within the Gulf of California and within the MAR region. One initiative is the Marine and Coastal Conservation Exchange (MCCE) between these two regions that took place 14-18 May in Cabo Pulmo, BCS, Mexico.  The objective of the MCCE was to enhance the successes and lessons learned in both the Gulf of California and the Mesoamerican Reef region to strengthen and improve the conservation, protection, and restoration of marine and coastal ecosystems while improving the livelihood of local communities.
Forty people are participating in the meeting from which 14 are MAR Fellows of the 2018 cohort from Belize, Guatemala, Honduras, and Quintana Roo. Themes discussed included the process of establishing and managing Cabo Pulmo National Park and other MPAS in the MAR region and the role of science and the local community within Cabo Pulmo’s success. Experts on communication campaigns from the Gulf of California Cabo Pulmo’s will explain how the media and social networks helped to defend Cabo Pulmo from massive tourism developers. By the end of the meeting, a round table with Cabo Pulmo community members and the National Commission on Protected Areas (CONANP) will be held to discuss the challenges and future of Cabo Pulmo given the high demand from the tourism sector.  
¡Big thanks to our friend in Cabo Pulmo for your hospitality and for sharing your knowledge with us. Congratulations to all of you for a successful and inspiring model of community development.  Hope to see you in the Mesoamerican Reef!
Mario Castro sharing Cabo Pulmo
Mario Castro sharing Cabo Pulmo's story
Regional Network orf Sustainable Fisheries
Regional Network orf Sustainable Fisheries

Dear Friends,

We hope you are having an excellent start to the year.

We are thrilled to share with you the latest news about the MAR Leadership Program (MAR-L). 

Network on Sustainable Fisheries in the Mesoamerican Reef region

MAR-L and MAR Fund organized a second meeting of the Network on Sustainable Fisheries in the Mesoamerican Reef region on November 26 and 27 in Cancun. The objectives of the meeting were to share the preliminary results of the mapping of actors, projects and initiatives related to fisheries in the MAR, identify strengths, threats and areas of opportunity to promote fisheries sustainability, design a medium-term regional strategy; define the mechanisms of governance, membership, and operation of the network.

MAR Fellows Ana (2011) and Angela (2011) were hired to carry out the mapping of actors, projects, and initiatives related to fisheries in the MAR and facilitate the workshop. The meeting was attended by 43 people from 38 organizations from the public, academic, and civil society from the four MAR countries. 12 MAR Fellows participated in the meeting and for of them are members of the network’s Executive Committee.

 2018 Fellows' Projects  

The Belizean team is implementing the project: Establishing the framework for a sustainable fishery based on community rights in Marine / Estuarine Wildlife Sanctuaries in Belize. The objective is to provide a model for the transition from a non-extractive Wildlife Sanctuary to a Wildlife Sanctuary (2), according to what is stipulated in the Law of the System of Protected Natural Areas, which guarantees the long-term sustainability of the fish populations and the protection of the rights of traditional users. Therefore, this project will develop a successful framework for a fishery based on the rights of the community with the active participation of local fishers through the re-designation of Corozal Bay Wildlife Sanctuary (CBWS), which can be replicated in other Wildlife Sanctuaries. A series of consultations with stakeholder communities have occurred. It has been confirmed that the proposed zones make 28.5% of the total area and includes seven (7) conservation zones, which were assigned with the input of fishers and key stakeholders. MAR Fellows have been supporting the process of developing a Sustainable Fisheries Plan, that is aimed to serve as the backbone of the statutory instrument that will govern the new designation of the protected area. MAR Leaders have identified important gaps that were not previously considered but need to be addressed for the success of the proposed project.

The Guatemala team is implementing the Project: Strengthening protection for

sharks in Guatemala, facilitating compliance with international agreements that regulate sustainable commercialization. This project aims at achieving the sustainable use of sharks that are currently commercialized in Guatemala and strengthening current efforts for their conservation. It will promote the proper control of their trade, through effective compliance with national protocols (National Action Plan for the Conservation and Management of the Sharks in Guatemala, and international protocols. The team has had an incredible six months since the training workshop in August 2018 in Puerto Morelos. They have implemented two workshops in Guatemala to install capacities in the visual identification of shark fins with governmental institutions, universities, and the private sector. Besides, they have created the first guide for five species of sharks listed in Appendix II, of CITES, this to give tools to institutions who are in charge of exportation. IUCN Shark Specialist Group invited two members of the team to a workshop of the Red List Evaluation for endemic and near-endemic species of sharks and rays of the Eastern Pacific from Mexico to Pacific Chile which was held last week in Colombia. The team is now preparing for a meeting on the 21st of February to create the interinstitutional table for sharks in Guatemala. By facilitating this dialogue, the group will be able to get feedback on the National Action Plan that the shark group is working jointly with the fisheries department.

The Honduran team is implementing the project: Improving the health of the reef through tourism-recreational services in Punta Gorda, Municipality of José Santos Guardiola, Roatan. This project seeks to establish a community-driven model of sustainable tourism promoting awareness and reasonable use of the reef ecosystem, working with the local municipality of Santo Guardiola, the tourism institute, and other entities involved. In the long term, it seeks to improve the health of the reef by decreasing illegal fishing and simultaneously increase the biomass of herbivorous fish. On November 9, 2018, representatives of the community and Roatan Marine Park held an event to launch the project which was attended by public-private institutions. The particiánts included the Governor and Deputy of the department of Islas de la Bahía, José Santos Guardiola municipality, Banca Solidario, the Director of the Chamber of Commerce, President of the Association of Fishermen, Representative of the Organized Women's Group, OPROME, Board of Trustees of Punta Gorda), Director of RMP, afterwards the words of the Governor Dino Silvestri, the Deputy Rom MacNab, and RMP Director Francis Lean.  An assessment of the current situation of the communities of Santa Elena and Punta Gorda is being developed, with the purpose of understanding the environment and the possible economic development alternatives for these communities. Once the results of the assessment are ready, training will take the place of inter-institutional working groups to search for cooperators interested in environmental protection and the sustainable development of communities.

The Mexican team is implementing the Project: Sustainable fisheries and sustainable tourism in Bahía Espiritu Santo as a local model of community development in the MAR. María Elena and Punta Herrero communities are located in Espiritu Santo Bay south of the Sian Ka'an Biosphere Reserve. This project seeks to diversify the productive activities in María Elena and Punta Herrero communities in the Sian Ka'an Biosphere Reserve by decreasing their dependence on fishing activities and promoting responsible community tourism activities. As part of the project, they will strengthen the capacities and abilities of the community groups, encourage the participation of women under a social entrepreneurship model that generates empowerment, promotes value chains and increase tourist visits to the site. The team has requested to Quintana Roo state government to improve the road to the communities of María Elena and Punta Herrero minimizing environmental impacts. A communication and outreach campaign has been launched in social networks to promote tourism activities in both communities. A meeting with the fishermen's cooperative took place to authorize the tourist cooperative to receive a cabin on loan to provide lodging for tourists.

Thank you very much for your continuous support.

The MAR Leadership team

MAR Fellows participating in the Fisheries Network
MAR Fellows participating in the Fisheries Network
Workshop Identification of Shark Fins Guatemala
Workshop Identification of Shark Fins Guatemala
Shark Fins Guatemala
Shark Fins Guatemala
Meetings with Punta Gorda community - Honduras
Meetings with Punta Gorda community - Honduras
Fellows at the project launch event in Punta Gorda
Fellows at the project launch event in Punta Gorda
Laura receiving Mary Robinson Award
Laura receiving Mary Robinson Award

Dear Friends,

We are happy to share with you MAR Leadership latest news.

2018 MAR Fellows that are promoting sustainable fisheries and community development, have been very active in designing their projects with mentors from Environmental Defense Fund (EDF). Once a month, each team meets virtually with EDF experts who provide advice, share information and contacts that will contribute to the successful development of Fellows' projects. We’ll share their progress in the next update.

During the 2018 cohort training cycle, 4 webinars are planned to be held which will deepen the topics discussed during the in-person workshop. In September a webinar on gender equity was delivered by 2018 Fellow Inés from Comunidad y Biodiversidad (COBI). The gender equity program for fisheries was launched by COBI in 2017 with the aim at achieving the equal participation of men and women in fisheries. Through this webinar participants learned how the program has been designed and implemented, as well as the challenges and solutions found.

We are excited to share that 2014 Fellow Laura from Honduras won the Mary Robinson 2018 Climate Justice Award at the One Young World Summit in The Hague. Laura’s award winning project, “Waste to Opportunity”, seeks to empower waste pickers in the municipal dumps of Roatan, by organizing them, promoting labor safety and providing seed funding for alternative and innovative processes. For her continued efforts to tackle plastic pollution in Roatan, Laura was selected to receive an award by the Rotary Club of Tegucigalpa, Honduras.

Laura has continued to work on promoting best practices among hotels and improving the waste management system of Roatan. In August, Laura along with the Mayor of Roatan, Mr. Hynds and 2014 Fellow Cindy (Honduras) visited  the waste management facilities of Belmopan, Belize including the transfer station and sanitary landfill. The visit was guided by 2014 Fellow Emerson, Officer at Belize Solid Waste Management Authority, and was intended to show the mayor better options for waste management and recycling in face of a collapsed dumpsite in Roatan.

Laura also invited Monica (2014 Fellow Mexico) to run a 3-day training with hotels, schools, authorities and other important stakeholders on the importance of solving the waste pollution crisis that Roatan is facing given a two-week fire at the municipal dump. Mónica toured two big hotels in West Bay beach to assess the opportunities of improving waste management. Following this visit, the Bay Island Conservation Association (BICA), which covered Monica’s travel expenses to Roatan, will develop a waste management plan for these hotels and two schools.

Emerson (Belize) shared with us that Punta Gorda’s dump site has been closed and a transfer station is under construction which was the objective of his MAR Leaderhip project in 2014. The construction started in July 2018 and will be finished by March 2019. The environmental awareness and public awareness component of his project is still pending; the community will be trained on how to separate recyclable materials and how to use the transfer station once it is operating.

In October 15 Fellows from different cohorts participated in the Healthy Reefs for Healthy People meeting that took place in Caye Caulker, Belize. Some Fellows gave keynote speeches sharing their work with the network members. 

Thank you very much for your kind support in protecting the MAR!

MAR Leaderhip Team 

Monica delivering a workshop in Roatan
Monica delivering a workshop in Roatan
Emerson showing Roatan
Emerson showing Roatan's Mayor transfer station
2014 Fellows Laura, Emerson and Cindy in Belize
2014 Fellows Laura, Emerson and Cindy in Belize
2018 Fellows
2018 Fellows

Dear friends and supporters,

We are happy to announce that the 2018 cohort has been selected. 2018 Fellows will promote sustainable fisheries and community development projects in the four MAR countries.

The 2018 cohort is made up of 22 Fellows: three from Belize, eight from Guatemala, four from Honduras and seven from Mexico. Four people come from fishing cooperatives,fourteen from civil society organizations, five from the private sector, and one from the government. 53% are women and 47% are men.

The training workshop for the 2018 cohort took place August 5 to 18 at the Institute of Marine Sciences and Limnology of the Autonomous University of Mexico, Puerto Morelos. During the first week, the Environmental Defense Fund (EDF) team led the training on sustainable fisheries management, marine reserves, climate change, science and fisheries management, monitoring and enforcement, blue economy and community development. The workshop included a combination of presentations, case study discussions and interactive sessions designed to put learning into practice. Local and global case studies and good practices in sustainable fisheries and coastal development were presented by national and international top-level experts and trainers such as MAR Fellows from previous cohorts (alumni), members of the Executive Committee and representatives from Friends of Cabo Pulmo, Kanan Kay Alliance, Community and Biodiversity, Wildlife Conservation Society, Belize Fisheries Department, Center for Marine Studies Center, Healthy Reefs for Healthy People, World Bank, Future of Fish, FMCN, Community Tours Sian Ka'an, and Sustentur.

During the second week,experts from the Environmental Law Alliance (ELAW) and the Center for Story-based Strategy trained Fellows on public policy advocacy and storytelling. Fellows also received training on negotiation, conflict resolution and construction of agreements with a gender perspective. The personal development and leadership styles session was also part of the curriculum.

Results of the workshop include the strengthening of the technical and leadership capacities of 22 fellows;the design of six projects on sustainable fisheries and community development in the MAR; the expansion of MAR Leadership network and exchange of experiences with representatives of Cabo Pulmo as a successful community-driven model of conservation and development.

During the training cycle of the 2018 cohort, 5 webinars are planned to deepen the topics discussed during the workshop, as well as a trip to Cabo Pulmo in May 2019 to continue exchanging experiences between both regions.

2018 Fellows are working on the following projects:

  1. Design and implementation of a regenerative network of best practices of sustainable fisheries in Omoa and Puerto Cortés in Honduras and Sian Ka’an and Banco Chinchorro in Quintana Roo Mexico.
  2. Sustainable fisheries and sustainable tourism in Bahía Espiritu Santo, as a local model of community development in the MAR.
  3. Improving the health of reef through sustainable tourism and recreational services in Punta Gorda, Roatan.
  4. Framework for a community rights-based sustainable fishery in Wildlife Sanctuaries in Belize
  5. Strengthening protection for sharks in Guatemala through compliance with international agreements that regulate sustainable commercialization
  6. Market opportunities for fisheries products associated with the mangrove ecosystem in Guatemala

 Thank you for your support!  

System Thinking Training
System Thinking Training
Fisheries Training
Fisheries Training
Fisheries
Fisheries
Fisheries exercise
Fisheries exercise
Conflict resolution exercise
Conflict resolution exercise
Experts panel
Experts panel
MAR Leadership 2018 cohort
MAR Leadership 2018 cohort
Personal Development
Personal Development
Fisheries
Fisheries

MESOAMERICAN REEF LEADERSHIP PROGRAM 2018 CALL FOR APPLICATIONS

The Mesoamerican Reef Leadership Program (MAR-L) is looking for teams of maximum six early to mid-career people based in the MAR ecoregion shared by Belize, Guatemala, Honduras and Mexico (state of Quintana Roo only) who are committed to conservation of the region’s coastal and marine ecosystems and wish to develop leadership skills to advance their careers.

Thematic Approach for the 2018 Cohort: Sustainable Fisheries

Team members should work together to pursue a collective impact at the local, state, national or regional level and should apply with a project related to sustainable fisheries that will also promote community development.
The MAR Leadership Program offers training, project incubation and network opportunities to emerging leaders from all relevant sectors as long as their professional activities and interests have a direct connection with the health and environmental sustainability of the region.

Eligibility Requirements

  • Be a resident of the Mesoamerican Reef ecoregion, which includes locations within Belize, the Caribbean basin of Guatemala and Honduras, and the State of Quintana Roo in Mexico;
  • Preferably be at the early to mid-career level;
  • Minimum three years of experience working on environmental (ideally coastal and marine resource related conservation) issues through community work, school, university or work experience;
  • Experience working with local community groups and/or initiatives;
  • Be passionate and capable of generating change;
  • Have regular access to the internet in order to participate in exchanging data, email, activities, and experiences from a remote location;
  • References from colleagues and supervisors.

Need more information?
Website: http://liderazgosam.org/en/ FACEBOOK: www.facebook.com/MARLeadership
YOUTUBE: www.youtube.com/user/marleadership


Attachments:
 

About Project Reports

Project Reports on GlobalGiving are posted directly to globalgiving.org by Project Leaders as they are completed, generally every 3-4 months. To protect the integrity of these documents, GlobalGiving does not alter them; therefore you may find some language or formatting issues.

If you donate to this project or have donated to this project, you will get an e-mail when this project posts a report. You can also subscribe for reports via e-mail without donating.

Get Reports via Email

We'll only email you new reports and updates about this project.

Organization Information

Fondo Mexicano para la Conservacion de la Naturaleza, A.C.

Location: Mexico D.F., Distrito Federal - Mexico
Website:
Facebook: Facebook Page
Twitter: @fondomexicano
Project Leader:
Maria Eugenia Arreola
Cancun, Quintana Roo Mexico
$11,927 raised of $25,000 goal
 
160 donations
$13,073 to go
Donate Now
lock
Donating through GlobalGiving is safe, secure, and easy with many payment options to choose from. View other ways to donate
Add Project to Favorites

Help raise money!

Support this important cause by creating a personalized fundraising page.

Start a Fundraiser

Learn more about GlobalGiving

Teenage Science Students
Vetting +
Due Diligence

Snorkeler
Our
Impact

Woman Holding a Gift Card
Give
Gift Cards

Young Girl with a Bicycle
GlobalGiving
Guarantee

Sign up for the GlobalGiving Newsletter

WARNING: Javascript is currently disabled or is not available in your browser. GlobalGiving makes extensive use of Javascript and will not function properly with Javascript disabled. Please enable Javascript and refresh this page.