Help Save Elephants in India

by Wildlife Trust of India
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Help Save Elephants in India
Help Save Elephants in India
Help Save Elephants in India
Help Save Elephants in India
Help Save Elephants in India
Help Save Elephants in India
Help Save Elephants in India
Help Save Elephants in India
Help Save Elephants in India
Help Save Elephants in India
Help Save Elephants in India
Help Save Elephants in India
Help Save Elephants in India
Help Save Elephants in India
Help Save Elephants in India
Help Save Elephants in India
Help Save Elephants in India

Project Report | Jan 3, 2017
Similipal National Park

By Harsha Doriya | Assistant project officer

Roaming in the field
Roaming in the field

Elephants have vast home ranges and tend to migrate between areas seasonally. In recent decades, a growing human population and its myriad developmental needs has led to the degradation and fragmentation of forest habitats, bringing humans and elephants into increased contact and conflict.

Dhenkanal district of Odisha, which accounts for the 2nd highest elephant population in Odisha after Similipal National Park is interspersed with villages and crop fields is reeling under frequent negative encounters with humans and damage to crops and habitations.  Since 2010, 402 elephants and 354 persons have reportedly been killed due to Human Elephant Conflict (HEC) in this region.

Recently, Wildlife Trust of India (WTI) was made aware of several instances where elephants migrating from Sunajhari and Kantajhari Reserve Forests were being trapped in the middle of the fast flowing Brahmani River by irate villagers on both sides. This was done in retaliation for crop losses and damage caused to their houses by elephants. WTI with support from Charities Aid Foundation - India (CAF India) is trying to ensure the passage for elephants by addressing the concerns of locals and involving them in the process of finding solutions. Response teams have been formed among the targeted villages. The teams have been equipped, trained to safely drive and deter wild elephants from conflict sites. They were also charged with sensitising fellow villagers about elephants and acting as forest department informers about the location of elephant herds.

Sagging electric lines had caused number of deaths of the gentle giants which roamed freely in the forests and also in private lands. Similar issue was informed by one of our response team in targeted village to DFO. After looking into the perspective, two new poles have been installed as correction measures. The spikes have been fitted at height which is higher than elephant’s height. Another response team on NH-55 is providing passage to elephants and also advising the people to keep their smaller vehicles behind the heavy vehicles for safety reason. The team provided the protection to newly born calf of an elephant for about three days until the both of them found a safer place to survive. Forest officials acknowledged and praised the members of the response team for this conservation effort.

Through continuous monitoring, the response teams will try to control issues of conflict in the area and ensure that villagers do not block elephants’ migratory passage. Addressing conflicts with elephants will further help marginalised people while avoiding the greater risks towards these large herbivores, thus saving the lives of both animals and humans. 

Preparing of response teams
Preparing of response teams
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Organization Information

Wildlife Trust of India

Location: Noida, Uttar Pradesh - India
Website:
Project Leader:
Monica Verma
Noida , Uttar Pradesh India
$92,299 raised of $100,000 goal
 
1,479 donations
$7,701 to go
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