Help Save Elephants in India

by Wildlife Trust of India
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Help Save Elephants in India
Help Save Elephants in India
Help Save Elephants in India
Help Save Elephants in India
Help Save Elephants in India
Help Save Elephants in India
Help Save Elephants in India
Help Save Elephants in India
Help Save Elephants in India
Help Save Elephants in India
Help Save Elephants in India
Help Save Elephants in India
Help Save Elephants in India
Help Save Elephants in India
Help Save Elephants in India
Help Save Elephants in India
Help Save Elephants in India
Human-elephant conflict prevention training
Human-elephant conflict prevention training

Hello and greetings from Wildlife Trust of India!

We hope you are doing great.

With this email, we are sharing updates for our project titled 'Help Save Elephants in India'. We are so honoured and grateful for your support as you chose to donate for the project among so many wonderful causes out there. This means a lot to us. Thank you so much for believing in our work.

Today’s updates are from ‘Fatehpur-Gadgadia’ Elephant corridor in Uttarakhand. Elephant corridors are narrow strips that connect fragmented forest patches. These forest patches are the remnants of a once-intact wild habitat that has now been severely encroached and fractured to satisfy human development needs. If these critical linkages or corridors are not protected from further encroachment, elephants would be forced to venture into human habitations leading to conflict, damage to property and loss of lives (for both humans and elephants).

To protect these corridors, WTI has deployed and empowered localised organisations or individuals to work as the eyes, ears and voice for corridors. We call them the Green Corridor Champions, who regularly monitor animal movement through designated corridors; work with local state and central governments to institutionalise corridor protection; sensitise local community and tactfully dissaud them from activities that can result in land use changes. GCCs are the key stakeholders ensuring safe passage for elephants.

We have 13 GCC teams monitoring nearly 30 elephant corridors across India. One such GCC team - with who we have been working for the last five years – organised a training session for the youth from forest-fringe dwelling areas of Uttarakhand. The GCC team monitors the critical Fatehpur-Gadgadia corridor which connects the Fatehpur range of Ramnagar Forest Division with the Gadgadia range of the Terai Central Forest Division. The training was on managing human-elephant conflict situations on an individual and community level. Regular corridor monitoring and community sensitisation drives were also conducted by the team.

This work could have been made possible due to your support,for which we are so grateful to you. We will be back with similar updates very soon. Till then, take care.

Warm regards,

Team WTI

'Drive Slow' signage near elephant corridor
'Drive Slow' signage near elephant corridor
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Torchlight Handover
Torchlight Handover

Greetings from Wildlife Trust of India!

Thank you so much for making a donation to our project ‘Help Save Elephants in India’. Your support is highly valued as it helped us reduce the impact of Human-elephant conflict around the Sathyamangalam Tiger Reserve. Here’s an update on activities conducted with your support.

Located in the Western Ghats, Sathyamangalam Tiger Reserve is a significant wildlife corridor in the Nilgiri Biosphere Reserve. It forms a link between the five protected areas it connects - the Biligiriranga Swamy Temple Wildlife Sanctuary, Sigur Plateau, Mudumalai National Park, Bandipur National Park and Cauvery Wildlife Sanctuary. This also allows gene flow between the diverse wildlife between Eastern and Western Ghats.

As per a 2017 survey conducted by the Forest Department, the reserve is home to 772 elephants. However, the sharing of same resources often leads to negative interactions between humans and elephants phrased the Human Elephant conflict. The forest department receives multiple complaints of crop raiding by elephants from the local community on a day to day basis. To address the issue, the forest department has engaged anti-depredation watchers in addition to the regular field staff to monitor elephant herd movements and keep the community safe from any mishaps.

The anti-depredation squads mostly work in night shifts and were in need of torchlights for patrolling. With your support, WTI has provided 30 torchlights to the squad. The District Forest Officer has informed that the torches have been quite useful in deterring elephants on a daily basis especially in the ranges of Talamalai, Vilamundi, Bhavanisagar, Kadambur and Sathyamangalam.

Such simple solutions and small efforts often smoothen the process and contribute significantly to preventing major conservation challenges such as the Human Elephant Conflict.

That’s all for today. We will soon be back with more updates for you. Till then, take care!

Warm Regards,

Team WTI

Anti-depredation unit using the torchlights
Anti-depredation unit using the torchlights
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Greetings from Wildlife Trust of India!

Hope you are doing great.

We are back with the updates on our project ‘Help Save Elephants in India’, which you so generously chose to donate for.

Thank you so much for your kind donation and for believing in our work. It is through your support that we are able to work towards our vision of a secure natural heritage of India.

Located in the Western Ghats, Sathyamangalam Tiger Reserve is a significant wildlife corridor within the Nilgiri Biosphere Reserve. It forms is a critical link connecting five protected areas - the Biligiriranga Swamy Temple Wildlife Sanctuary, Sigur Plateau, Mudumalai National Park, Bandipur National Park and Cauvery Wildlife Sanctuary. The connectivity ensures movement of animals across Protected Areas and thus allows the transfer of genetic material between populations located in Eastern and Western Ghats.

Around 65% of the area is under forest cover and a significant proportion comprises mixed shrub lands and grasslands supporting a large number of herbivore ungulates. The reserve hosts a variety of species such as tigers, Asian elephants, gaurs, leopards, sloth bears and birds. As per a 2017 survey conducted by the Forest Department, the reserve is home to 772 elephants.

Along with the thriving elephant and other wildlife population, the landscape is interspersed with human habitations. Sadly, the close proximity of humans and wildlife, particularly elephants, results in frequent confrontations and conflicts, majorly due to crop-raiding behaviour of the elephants.

To tackle the rising human-elephant conflict situations, the forest department has engaged anti-depredation watchers in particular in addition to the regular forest field staff.

The department requested support to equip the anti-depredation watchers with high power torch lights which will be useful to effectively handle conflict situations, more likely to occur at night. With your support, 30 torchlights were provided through a Rapid Action Project to the Department staff.

Thank you once again for your support. We will soon be back with more updates on the work we do to protect elephant population in India. Till then, take care!

 

Warm regards,

Team WTI

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Children in Uttarakhand on World Elephant Day
Children in Uttarakhand on World Elephant Day

Dear friend,

Hope you have been keeping well!

We are glad to share with you the updates for the project ‘Help save elephants in India’. Thank you so much for supporting this project and for your generous donation to the appeal on GlobalGiving platform.

The updates for today are about activities supporting ‘Right of Passage’; which is one of the flagship projects of Wildlife Trust of India (WTI). WTI has been working to secure the wildlife corridors through the ‘Right of Passage’ project to ensure uninterrupted movement of elephants and other wildlife species between key habitats and protected areas. The wildlife corridors are linear strips of land connecting two or more, otherwise fragmented, forest patches.

Along with forest departments and partner NGOs, WTI teams are working to protect 55 corridors across 5 regions (North-Eastern India, Southern India, Central India, North Western India and Northern West Bengal). We are working with a network of regional organisations and individuals called ‘Green Corridor Champions (GCCs) that work at the grass root-level and are involved in the protection of wildlife corridors within their regions. The GCCs help us in protecting the corridors and monitoring corridor usage by wild animals, doing policy advocacy and for spreading awareness on the importance of corridors among the local population.

12th of August, every year, is celebrated as the World Elephant Day. On this day, GCCs in Uttarakhand and Tamil Nadu organised awareness events including bike rallies, painting competitions, webinars and road shows across the two states. The events were extremely successful where around 500 people took part in the celebrations. All this could be made possible with your support.

Once again, thank you so much for your generous support in our endeavour to provide ‘Right of Passage’ to the gentle giants. We will be soon back with more updates. Till then, take care!

With regards,

Team WTI

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Workshop with the department
Workshop with the department

Dear donor,

Hope you are doing well and keeping safe.

Today’s updates are from the Wayanad region of the Western Ghats landscape. The Western Ghats hill ranges are a global biodiversity hotspot, and their positioning makes them a treasure house of biodiversity. The region particularly supports large elephant populations – approximately 30% of the world’s Asian elephant population live in this Western Ghats landscape.

Given the criticality of the landscape, Wildlife Trust of India has been working with communities on securing Right of Passage for Asian elephants in Wayanad for more than a decade. This quarter, we helped with capacity building of the frontline forest staff working within Protected Areas in Wayanad region and the local community. Frontline forest staff ae well as the communities living around forests are one of the most important stakeholders when it comes to conserving wildlife and guarding the Protect Areas. And so, training and capacity building is a great value add to their overall skillset. We conducted four workshops for the community living near forest habitats and frontline forest staff in Wayanad. Two workshops were on the importance of elephant corridors, one on forest fire awareness and precautions, and another workshop was conducted on Disaster management and Man-Animal conflict.       

Apart from the training sessions, field kits were distributed to the forest staff including the temporary frontline watchers who are actively engaged in ensuring safe passage to elephants as well as caution humans, when elephants travel through human habitations.  

Thanks to your generous support, we were able to continue our work on conserving elephants and their habitats in this part of the Western Ghats landscape. We will keep sharing similar updates with you, till then take care and stay safe.

Warm Regards,

Team WTI

Workshop with the communities
Workshop with the communities
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Organization Information

Wildlife Trust of India

Location: Noida, Uttar Pradesh - India
Website:
Project Leader:
Monica Verma
Noida, Uttar Pradesh India
$80,484 raised of $100,000 goal
 
1,298 donations
$19,516 to go
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