Help Save Elephants in India

by Wildlife Trust of India
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Help Save Elephants in India
Help Save Elephants in India
Help Save Elephants in India
Help Save Elephants in India
Help Save Elephants in India
Help Save Elephants in India
Help Save Elephants in India
Help Save Elephants in India
Help Save Elephants in India
Help Save Elephants in India
Help Save Elephants in India
Help Save Elephants in India
Help Save Elephants in India
Help Save Elephants in India
Help Save Elephants in India
Help Save Elephants in India
Help Save Elephants in India
Children in Uttarakhand on World Elephant Day
Children in Uttarakhand on World Elephant Day

Dear friend,

Hope you have been keeping well!

We are glad to share with you the updates for the project ‘Help save elephants in India’. Thank you so much for supporting this project and for your generous donation to the appeal on GlobalGiving platform.

The updates for today are about activities supporting ‘Right of Passage’; which is one of the flagship projects of Wildlife Trust of India (WTI). WTI has been working to secure the wildlife corridors through the ‘Right of Passage’ project to ensure uninterrupted movement of elephants and other wildlife species between key habitats and protected areas. The wildlife corridors are linear strips of land connecting two or more, otherwise fragmented, forest patches.

Along with forest departments and partner NGOs, WTI teams are working to protect 55 corridors across 5 regions (North-Eastern India, Southern India, Central India, North Western India and Northern West Bengal). We are working with a network of regional organisations and individuals called ‘Green Corridor Champions (GCCs) that work at the grass root-level and are involved in the protection of wildlife corridors within their regions. The GCCs help us in protecting the corridors and monitoring corridor usage by wild animals, doing policy advocacy and for spreading awareness on the importance of corridors among the local population.

12th of August, every year, is celebrated as the World Elephant Day. On this day, GCCs in Uttarakhand and Tamil Nadu organised awareness events including bike rallies, painting competitions, webinars and road shows across the two states. The events were extremely successful where around 500 people took part in the celebrations. All this could be made possible with your support.

Once again, thank you so much for your generous support in our endeavour to provide ‘Right of Passage’ to the gentle giants. We will be soon back with more updates. Till then, take care!

With regards,

Team WTI

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Workshop with the department
Workshop with the department

Dear donor,

Hope you are doing well and keeping safe.

Today’s updates are from the Wayanad region of the Western Ghats landscape. The Western Ghats hill ranges are a global biodiversity hotspot, and their positioning makes them a treasure house of biodiversity. The region particularly supports large elephant populations – approximately 30% of the world’s Asian elephant population live in this Western Ghats landscape.

Given the criticality of the landscape, Wildlife Trust of India has been working with communities on securing Right of Passage for Asian elephants in Wayanad for more than a decade. This quarter, we helped with capacity building of the frontline forest staff working within Protected Areas in Wayanad region and the local community. Frontline forest staff ae well as the communities living around forests are one of the most important stakeholders when it comes to conserving wildlife and guarding the Protect Areas. And so, training and capacity building is a great value add to their overall skillset. We conducted four workshops for the community living near forest habitats and frontline forest staff in Wayanad. Two workshops were on the importance of elephant corridors, one on forest fire awareness and precautions, and another workshop was conducted on Disaster management and Man-Animal conflict.       

Apart from the training sessions, field kits were distributed to the forest staff including the temporary frontline watchers who are actively engaged in ensuring safe passage to elephants as well as caution humans, when elephants travel through human habitations.  

Thanks to your generous support, we were able to continue our work on conserving elephants and their habitats in this part of the Western Ghats landscape. We will keep sharing similar updates with you, till then take care and stay safe.

Warm Regards,

Team WTI

Workshop with the communities
Workshop with the communities
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Dear Patron,

Hope you have been well!

In today’s updates, we present to you our work in mitigating forest fires in the Western Ghats landscape, a critical elephant habitat.

There has been a substantial increase in forest fire incidents in the southern states of India, since 2019. The trend has been observed not just in our country, but in other parts of the globe as well – such as the raging forest fires across Australia and Amazon rainforests. These devastating occurrences have prompted the Forest Department in India to take preventive measures to mitigate this threat. Further, the death of forest watchers every year while trying to douse these fires is another extreme that calls for a proper management system to be established.

To support the forest department with appropriate management measures, Wildlife Trust of India (WTI), through Rapid Action Projects (RAPs), provided fire prevention equipment to several Protected Areas in the southern states of Kerala and Karnataka. In 2019, high summer temperatures along with high wind speed resulted in a massive fire outbreak that destroyed more than 60 hectares of forest cover in less than 3 days! To prevent a similar disaster this summer, fire-fighting equipment using innovative operational mechanisms were distributed across the region. WTI provided Leaf Blowers, modified water sprayers and drones to the Forest Department.

The department in now equipped and more than ready to prevent the spread of small scale fires (in the initial stages) that turn into massive disasters if left unchecked. They have been catching small fires with the help of real-time monitoring through drones. Also, they can now access remote locations through fabricated jeeps and tractors with water sprayers to douse the fire on time. Further, the rapid fire-dousing mechanism of leaf blowers has proved highly efficient in preventing large scale damage to this elephant heaven.

That’s all for this time. We will get back to you with similar updates soon. Till then, take very good care of yourself!

Warm regards,

Team WTI

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House damaged by elephants
House damaged by elephants

Dear Patron,

Today's updates for the project are from the tea gardens of Chenga and Panighatta regions in the Northern West Bengal. 

Around the tea gardens in the above mentioned regions, the human-elephant conflict instances were on the rise - the elephants were reportedly damaging houses and other infrastructure. Through WTI's intervention, our Rapid Action Project (RAP) proponent from the region, Mr Avijan Saha, identified certain factors which were responsible for this unrest.     

There were several unused or non-functional plantations near human settlements in which the unkempt tea bushes and invasive weeds had grown quite dense. This encouraged the elephant herds to come and take shelter within these plantations and near the human settlements resulting in frequent conflict instances. 

Mr. Saha engaged a small conservation group comprising science students and community youth as well as the gram panchayat in an initiative to de-weed and clear the bushes. 

Further, the movement of elephants through tea-bushes is mostly silent and does not alert the local communities about elephant presence. To address this, the team helped in installing bamboo fences around the settlements in the landscape. The bamboo barricade would serve as an early warning system if the elephants do try venturing in.

These interventions have significantly brought down conflict in the last couple of months as the elephants continue to move across and do not halt near the settlements any longer. Mr. Saha and his team continue to sensitise these communities.

That's all for today's updates. We would like to take this opportunity to thank you for your generous support and for believing in our project. Thank you for being a part of our team as we look forward to continue the good work. 

Regards

Team WTI  

Overgrowth of tea bushes and weeds
Overgrowth of tea bushes and weeds
Setting up of bamboo baricades
Setting up of bamboo baricades
Vegetation cleared by the Gram Panchayat and team
Vegetation cleared by the Gram Panchayat and team
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Ration distribution
Ration distribution

“Hope is important because it can make the present moment less difficult to bear. If we believe that tomorrow will be better, we can bear a hardship today.”

- Thich Nhat Hanh

 

Dear patron,

Today’s updates are on hope and resilience – how they keep us going in the face of adversity.

The world is battling the COVID 19 pandemic and we are all in this together. We are grateful that your generous support for our work never ceased despite the difficult times. And neither did our teams stop working.

Conserving Asian elephants and their habitat is one of the priorities for our organisation. We are honoured to share this responsibility with generous donors such as yourself, the communities dwelling around protected areas, the forest departments of various states, frontline forest staff, our network of local conservation organisations and individuals amongst others.

The pandemic crippled the world with nations getting locked down and caught us all off guard. Our stakeholders- especially the local communities living around protected areas and the frontline forest staff (which includes the daily wagers, casual labourers and the temporary staff in addition to the permanent Forest Department staff members) – were severely affected. A disrupted supply chain worsened by their remote habitation resulted in poor access to even basic necessities like food grains and sanitization facilities.

Our teams however reached out to these communities, in and around our project sites. So far we have provided ration and safety gears (facemasks, gloves, and sanitisers) to over 800 frontline forest staff and nearly 6000 forest fringe dwelling community members living close to elephant and other wildlife habitats.   

Wildlife Trust of India has been working with these communities and rangers for over two decades, and we understand their role as Guardians of the Wild. Their role in elephant conservation (along with protecting other species) is indispensable. While they are the frontrunners of conservation, we continue to stand by them as they help keep wildlife #Foreverwild.

We are hopeful that things will be better soon. Till then, stay safe!

 

Warm regards,

Team WTI

Ration distribution
Ration distribution
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Organization Information

Wildlife Trust of India

Location: Noida, Uttar Pradesh - India
Website:
Project Leader:
Monica Verma
Noida, Uttar Pradesh India
$65,693 raised of $65,000 goal
 
1,094 donations
$0 to go
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