Education  India Project #21871

Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children

by Salaam Baalak Trust
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Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children
Salaam Baalak Trust - working for street children

Introduction
Salaam Baalak Trust’s (SBT) has been working towards the care and protection of street children since 1988. One of the key components of our programme is to provide safe spaces for children. Thus, SBT has established children homes which provide shelter (long-term or short-term) along with a continuum of need based care services. These services include medical care, food and nutrition (three hot cooked meals and evening nutrition), psychological support, education, vocational training, job placement, restoration and rehabilitation. The homes also provide sports and latent talent development opportunities for holistic development. All the children homes are recognized and licensed under the Integrated Child Protection Scheme (ICPS) in tandem with Juvenile Justice Act, 2015. The admission and care plan of each child is made under the guidance of respective Child Welfare Committees (CWCs).


Key Activities and Progress Update


Children’s homes are child-friendly spaces designed for all-round development of children. The teams at these homes are skilled and experienced in working with street children. They work with children in a very compassionate manner such children can leave behind their harsh experiences on the streets and live together in the Home with one another like one big family. The children’s homes are well-equipped with essential physical infrastructure including classrooms, play area, dormitories and computer rooms and libraries.


Brief Overview of Different Children Homes :


Aasra Children Home for Boys
Aasra was the first shelter home started by SBT. With a capacity of 50 it caters to boys of five to 18 years. It is currently located in Najafgarh.

Apna Ghar Open Shelter for Boys
It is a short stay home, where 30 children come to stay short duration and then they are either restored or transferred to a long stay home. It is currently located in Paharganj.


DMRC Children Home for Boys

DMRC Children’s Home was established as part of Delhi Metro Rail Corporation’s corporate social responsibility. The home houses 125 boys from the age of five to below 18 years. It is currently located in Tiz Hazari.

Old Delhi Railway Station (ODRS) Open Shelter for Boys
ODRS is an open centre catering to 30 boys. It is a short stay home, where children come to stay short duration. It is currently located in Mori Gate.


Arushi Children Home for Girls
Arushi was SBT’s first girls’ home. It offers 24-hour shelter and care to 50 girls between the ages of five years to 18 years. It is currently located in Gurugram.


Udaan-Rose Children Home for Girls
Udaan-Rose children’s home was initiated with the support of Give 2 Asia in March 2010. It started with eight girls and currently shelters 75 girls at a time. It is currently located in Kamla Nagar.


Residential Care: Children at the children’s home are provided shelter. A safe space is a felt critical need of children both boys and girls rescued from the unsafe streets. Aasra, Apna Ghar, Old Delhi Railway Station Open Centre (ODRS OC) DMRC Children’s Home are home for boys; Udaan and Arushi are children’s homes for girls. The children living in the homes get their own beds, clothes and hygiene kits. They spend their day according to a set routine living with other children. They develop a sense of belonging at the children’s homes considering it their own home.

Food and Nutrition: Besides serving the prime purpose of providing a ‘safe living space’ to children, children’s home offer a comprehensive package of services including food and nutrition. Children at the homes are provided three hot-cooked nutritious and well-balanced meals. Evening and special nutrition is provided to children suffering from malnutrition and undernutrition.


Education: At all the children homes, education of children is given utmost importance. Children whether coming for short stay or long stay are exposed to and involved in educational activities. Given the differential learning needs of children, education is imparted through formal, informal and open schooling. In-house classes are conducted by SBT teachers in a play-way and participatory manner. The children who come for long stay are prepared to join formal schools. The transition of out of school children to formal schools is a definite success paving the way for their vocational training and job placement.
Medical Care: In order to ensure that children are protected against all infections and ailments, medical social workers along with medical coordinator organise regular check-ups and vaccination camps of children. SBT’s in-house doctors conduct these check-ups and camps. Additionally, dental, eye and ear-nose and throat (ENT) check-ups are also conducted at the children’s homes. Adequate medical care lays a strong foundation for physical health of children.


Mental Health and Psychological Support: Full-time mental health professionals appointed in the homes provide psychological support and counselling to children. The mental health and psychological support help children rescued from the streets get over their traumatic past, become mentally stable and adequately acclimatize and adjust to the environment at the home. Individual and group activities are conducted with the children by the counsellors to unearth and sort unresolved issues and concerns of children.


Vocational Training and Job Placement: Children who are above 16 and/or have completed Class 10 are linked to a wide range of vocational training courses. A career counsellor matches children’s skill sets and interest with suitable courses. Based on counsellor’s recommendation children join vocational courses of their choice. Children at SBT homes often opt for computer, travel and tourism, fashion designing, beauty culture and hotel management courses. Upon completion of their vocational training courses children are also assisted in finding gainful employment. The home teams help children in applying for jobs.

Restoration and Rehabilitation: Those children who are missing or run away from their homes often long for their families. The children’s home teams in conjunction with the CHILDLINE and police make efforts to find homes and families of these children and reunite them with their parents and significant others. For those children who live in the children’s home till they turn 18, a proper rehabilitation plan is drawn. These young adults are not only linked to jobs but are also supported in finding a new accommodation and are provided basic necessities to start a life such as bedding utensils and financial assistance for buying groceries and pay rent for up to three months. Rehabilitation is SBT’s carefully planned attempt to reintegrate the children back into societies as productive adults and responsible citizens.


 A snapshot of services provided from April 1, 2018-March 2019


Residential care provided
7721 (374 girls)

Restoration
2177 children

Education (Formal Schooling)
876

Open Schooling
75

Non-Formal Education
4373

Food and Nutrition
7721

Health Check Up
4132

Skill Development and Vocational Training
293

Job Placement
140

Apart from these activities, children celebrated festivals such as Eid, Holi, Diwali, X-Mas, and national holidays etc. Children also went for educational trips and tours. These activities helped children bond with each other and created a ‘we’ feeling among them.


Future Plan
SBT team plans to improve the existing quality of services through increased networks, better opportunities and staff capacity building. The team is making concerted efforts to reach a greater number of children in the coming year. Accelerated focus is being laid on formal schooling of children. More avenues are also being explored to link children and young adults with viable vocational training facilities.

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Introduction and Goal

Since its inception, SBT has been striving to provide comprehensive care and protection services to street and working children. This package of services includes residential facilities, health and nutrition, education, vocational training and rehabilitation services. A critical component of this package remains medical and health facilities. It has been seen that children on streets live in insanitary conditions and are prone to various infections and diseases, therefore providing them adequate medical facilities is often the first priority for SBT team. In an endeavour to ensure effective delivery of medical services, SBT has envisioned a multifaceted medical programme. 

 

Under the medical programme, SBT covers the following two pronged objectives.

  1. To improve access to adequate and timely medical services of children rescued / and or motivated to live in shelter homes.
  2. To strengthen medical and health programme to ensure maximum quality health care.

Project Goal

The present project supports the medical programme activities at Aasra Residential Centre of SBT. From the valuable grants under the Project salaries of medical social worker and medical programme implementation has been supported at Aasra. The Centre is located in Najafgarh area of Delhi and provides shelter and other services to about 50 boys at any given point of time.

 Activities

It has been SBT’s long standing principle that quality medical aid must be provided to every child. As good health is foundation on which a stable and happy future can be built. Under this ambit, first aid and a medical check up is provided within 24 hrs of coming in touch with SBT.  When a child comes in to touch with SBT with any major medical problem, she/ he is referred to hospital immediately, prescribed care is provided and regular follow up is done. With the support, street children residing Aasra Residential Centre of Salaam Baalak Trust were direct beneficiaries to the medical programme. (For details see Table 1)

Awareness Session on Dental Health at Aasra Centre

 

As part of the medical programme following activities have been conducted:

 

  • First Aid care was provided to children who came with an injury to the Centre.
  • Regular health check-ups of regular children staying at the centre for long stay were conducted.
  • Awareness sessions were conducted by the medical social workers to sensitize children on issues of health, hygiene, and sanitation.
  • Medicines were provided to children suffering from illness and sickness.
  • Those children who were diagnosed from a major illness were provided specialised medical care through hospitals.
  • Heath camps were organised to provide routine immunization to children to protect them from preventable childhood diseases.

 

Dental Check-up at the Centre

 

Snapshot of Progress Achievements and Targets  

The number of children reached under various components of medical programme at Aasra Centre is provided below.

Table 1: Medical Programme Coverage and Outreach

Activities

Number of Beneficiaries

Remarks

Total Beneficiaries

50

T.T Vaccine  (1 Camp)

25

Dental (1 Camp)

29

Eye check up

9

Medical Investigation

5

Surgery

2

(Eye & leg)

Long term Care

3

(Kidney disorder & HIV Positive infection)

Hospital Referrals

Medicine Department

16

ENT Department

6

Skin Department

4

Surgery Department

5

 

Future Plan

This year the medical team plans to forge stronger partnership with hospitals to ensure high quality care to children. Additionally, the team will make necessary efforts to organise capacity building sessions for medical staff throughout the year.

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Introduction
Recognizing the need to protect the future of the children residing on streets, Salaam Baalak Trust (SBT) was established in 1988. SBT’s full care residential centres intend to fulfil street children’s longing for safety and security by providing them a caring and nurturing environment with a sense of security. A safe place to sleep, a small cupboard to store personal belongings, a somewhat set pattern to life (e.g. regulated timings for food, study, play, roll call and going to bed etc.). Additionally, the Trust also has a vision of ensuring access of street children to high quality services ranging from health, nutrition, education, vocational training to job placement.
Arushi children home was the first girls’ home established by SBT, given the accentuated vulnerabilities of girls living on girls to sexual abuse, exploitation and physical violence. Located in Gurugram, Haryana, the home provides shelter to around 60 girls at a time. The home has been designed in a very child friendly manner and is equipped with all the facilities and amenities required by growing children, including, class rooms, play area, dormitory, indoor space for games and in-house classes and computers and digital infrastructure.


Rationale and Context
Under the funded project, quality and inclusive education is being provided to girls rescued from the streets and enrolled in SBT’s Arushi residential home. In recognition of the role and value of education in shaping children’s future, for their intellectual development and transform them into productive citizens, comprehensive efforts are made at SBT’s residential homes.
Education of children at SBT is need-based and demand-driven. To fulfil these criteria, the Trust employs various modes to educate children including formal and non-formal best suited to their existent knowledge and skills. Wherever possible, the objective is to bring children into mainstream education. The overriding goal, though, is to help children develop into informed, capable, and responsible citizens. To these ends. SBT variously engages with the National Institute of Open Schooling (NIOS), formal schools, non-formal education, and bridge courses.


Objectives
The key objectives of the funded project are:
To ensure access of children in SBT’s residential centres to quality and inclusive education
To provide these children additional educational support bridging the learning gaps they have while they are out of school
To prepare and ready children for mainstream education through formal and open schools
Progress on Key Activities
The proposed intervention for which funding support is being sought is on-going. Following activities are being undertaken as part of the intervention.
Determining suitable mode of education for children: Upon registration of children at Arushi home,the staff members conducted a thorough analysis of their background, present interests and readiness and educational skills. Keeping these as benchmarks, they charted out an educational plan for each child. Mostly girls with substantial educational gaps, were provided bridge classes for preparing and strengthening their academic base. Bridge courses are specifically provided to those children who have suffered breaks in their formal education. The programme provides intensive coaching to such children, aiming to help them re-join formal schooling in a class appropriate to their age. During these courses weekly tests were conducted for children. Additionally debates were conducted to improve their knowledge. Following this, according to girls’ educational level and age they were 4 enrolled in a suitable mode of education. For instance, those girls who were in a school and dropped out for a short span of time were linked to a formal school. In other cases, those children who have been out of school for quite some time were provided bridge course to make them ready to join a school.
Enrolling children in formal schools: The trust lays ample emphasis on linking children to mainstream education. A total of 39 girls were linked to formal schools. These girls were eligible and ready to go to a school and were prepared for the same by Arushi’s in-house teachers. The girls were given adequate guidance by the staff members and were motivated to join a school at the earliest. Following this, the staff members applied for children’s admission in good schools located in the vicinity of the centre. All formalities and documentation was completed by the staff members and educational material, uniform, school fee etc. is sponsored by the trust. The girls linked to formal schools are regularly attending their classes and are being constantly supported to keep pace with the school curriculum.
Enrolling in open schools: A number of children who remain out of school for a large span of their life on streets and do not feel confident and comfortable enough to joining regular schools are taught at the centre by in-house teachers. They are rigorously motivated by the staff members including counsellors to get registered in NIOS and progressively clear Classes 8, 10 and 12 to secure minimum qualification to pursue higher education or respectable job. Such girls at Arushi went through bridge courses and were enrolled in NIOS after the bridge classes were over. Two girls supported by the project have been enrolled in NIOS. A total of six girls from the residential home are presently studying through open schooling.
Providing non-formal education: Apart from the above mentioned cases, some girls rescued from the streets had considerable learning gaps. To address these gaps, children were schooled at the centre through non-formal education (NFE). These classes focus on interesting and interactive learning through a participatory approach. A wide range of techniques are employed under the program, including painting, games, storytelling, papier mache, songs, quizzes, bachchon ki adalat etc. Other activities undertaken under NFE classes include, drawing classes, art and craft, reciting rhymes and practising numbers and alphabets. A total of 12 girls are attending NFE classes at Arushi.
Extending regular in-house educational support: All girls in formal, open and non-formal schools are being provided regular in-house educational support by Arushi teachers. In case of school-going children, the teachers helped them in understanding school curriculum and complete their homework and assignments on a daily basis. For children in open schools, the teachers shared the onus of helping children complete their academic syllabus and prepare them for exams. The in-house teachers remain instrumental in conducting non-formal education and bridge classes for children.
Mapping progress: The academic progress of the children was mapped through written examination in schools and centre. Children were marked on their performance at the centre. The centre staff regularly maintained all the documents including progress reports, attendance registers. Educational coordinator made monitoring visits to map the progress of the children and the centres educational activities on the whole.


Progress Report of some of the Children Supported
Brief overview of progress achieved by girls supported by the project is indicated below.
Manisha – She is presently studying in Class 12 in St. Crispin Senior Secondary school. She is doing well in her studies and working hard to score good marks in internal and board exams. She is also learning Bollywood dancing through Tansen Sangeet Mahavidyalya.
5
Lovepreet- She is in Class 10 in St. Crispin Senior Secondary school. She is a fast learner and has been excelling in her studies. She is learning to play Guitar from 4 G global institute.
Sophia- Sophia is presently studying in Class 10 through NIOS. She wants to become a chef and is very keen to join hospitality sector.
Monika- Monika is presently in Class 10 in St. Crispin Senior Secondary school. She wants to pursue a course in veterinary sciences after she completes her education. She will be working for an NGO which working for welfare of animals.
Madhu- Madhu is presently doing bridge course. She aspires to pursue a cooking course and become a chef.
Priyanka- Priyanka is presently studying in Class 10 through NIOS. She is also working under City Walk programme of SBT – a walk conducted by children who once lived on the streets depicting problems and challenges they faced. She intends to join theatre in near future.
Abida- is a 12 year old girl she is suffering attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Despite her psychological condition, she performs daily tasks adequately and at present she is enrolled in the Kitty Garden school in Class 4. In future, there are plans to admit her to Edah Special school.
Pinki-Pinki is regularly attending school and is studying in Class 5 in Kitty Garden school. She is doing well in her studies.
Ritu- She is good in studies. She is in Class 5 in Kitty Garden public school.
Heena- Heena recently cleared her Class 10 exams with 6 CGPA. She has opted for humanities as her majors in Class 11.
Asha- Asha is studying in Class 7 in a Government school. She is a bright child who is serious about her studies and aspires to be a police personnel.


Future Plan
In the next half of the year Arushi team is geared to continually provide quality education to the girls, link more and more girls to mainstream education and prepare adolescent girls for vocational training.

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Introduction


Street children are deprived of protective environment of family. Article 20 of United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child recognizes the right of such children who cannot be looked after by their own family to special care. The Government of India also accorded serious attention to provide protective environment of children in need of care including street children through enactment of the Juvenile Justice (Care and Protection of Children) Act, 2000 and subsequent amendments to the Act. The Act in its Section 37 provides for establishment of shelter homes for children in need of care and protection. Significance of shelter homes and residential centres for street children is immense, given the exploitative, violent and hostile situations they face in cities. Shelter homes or residential centres act as safety nets protecting street children from sexual abuse and exploitation, physical violence and child labour.
SBT Residential Centres are Unique
Unlike orphanages, shelter homes and other child care institutions, full-care and short stay residential homes provide an enabling environment to children to realize their potential to the fullest. An attempt is made to educate and help children develop intellectually at these centres. However, children who are not inclined towards academics are not pushed towards a definite career path. Children are provided opportunities to develop their hidden talents and skills. They are encouraged to pursue dance, puppetry, acting, painting and photography as well.
DMRC Children Home for Boys
DMRC Children’s Home was established as part of Delhi Metro Rail Corporation’s corporate social responsibility. The home on an average houses 125 boys from the age of five to below 18 years. The centre provides shelter, education, clothing, food and all needed amenities to children rescued from streets.
4
In the reporting period, the centre already housed 130 children and a total of new 114 new children were admitted to the centre. Of these a total of 105 children were restored, transferred and released on the orders of the Child Welfare Committee. As on March 21, 2018, the centre housed a total of 139 children.
Activities and Progress Update
Education
Laying adequate emphasis on the role of education to develop personality and character of children, the centre makes all efforts to link children to education. The education programme at the centre is pliable as it is based on the individual needs of children. Depending on their existing knowledge and preparedness children are provided education through different modes including non-formal education (NFE), open school, and formal education.
During the reporting period a total of 60 children have been provided formal education. A total of 10 boys have been transitioned from NFE programme to formal education. New enrolment of 37 children has been made in schools. Apart from this, 18 children are getting education through distance learning in NIOS. All new children have been covered under NFE program. Approximately 250 children have benefitted through NFE classes.


Food and Nutrition


The three balanced meals provided to children residing at the centre in addition to an evening snacks. The diet entails a well-balanced nutritious diet. The school going children get nutritious lunch boxes packed for their schools. Seasonal fresh fruits are part of the evening snacks. Special diets are also been provided to sick children and the boys who are into sport activities. On an average food and nutrition services are provided to a total of 130-140 children at the centre.
Health
Regular medical check- ups of children are done at the centre. A full time doctor employed with SBT comes regularly to conduct medical check-ups. The centre has two medical social workers to take care of the children’s medical needs and emergency cases. Apart from the health check-ups, specialised care is provided to children. In the reporting period a number of children were provided specialised care. (For details See Table)


Table 1: Children Provided Specialised Medical Care
Treatment services
No of children
Neuro and seizure disorder
07
Psychological/Psychiatric Treatment
07
Thalassemia
01
Asthma
03
Hepatitis B
01
Speech Therapy
02
Physically Impaired
01
Spinal Problem
01
Tuberculosis
01
Total
24 children
5
Extra-curricular Activities
Children are engaged in various activities like football, cricket, soccer and squash. A sports teacher at the centre channelises children’s energy in lots of indoor and outdoor activities. Children also attend swimming and karate classes and participate in various local and inter-organizational games & sports competitions. Children’s involvement in extra-curricular activities ensures their all-round development. (For Details See Table Below)
Table 2: Children Engaged in Extra-curricular Activities*
Extra-curricular Activities
No of Children
Dance Class
50
Library Facility
300
Theatre Class
35
Squash
3
Athlete
2
Football
6
Kick Boxing
2
*These numbers are not mutually exclusive, a child can opt for more than one extracurricular activities.
Skill development
To prepare adolescents for an adult life, they are linked to skill development and vocational training courses. Children at DMRC are provided theatre and dance classes. Theatre is one of the primary ways children learn about life: about actions and consequences, about customs and beliefs, about others and themselves. Apart from this, in house classes for electrical and electronic course are provided to children. Also children are given computer training. (For Details See Table)
Table 3: Skill Development and Vocational Training
Vocational training and Skill Development Courses
Number of children
In-house training (Electrical and Electronic)
100
City Walk Training
4
Dance Training
1
Art and Craft (Prabhat Resource Centre)
5
Cooking & Baking
3
Hospitality
1
Industrial Training Institute
1
Photography
1
General Duty Assistant
1
Facility Care & Management
3
Marketing & Personality Development
2
Total
122


Rehabilitation and Job Placement


Rehabilitation is an ongoing process at the centre. The adolescent boys are prepared for an adult life through engaging them in education, vocational training, and dance and sports classes. A career counselor guides them to opt for suitable vocational training courses. Many children also excel in theatre & dance and opt them as a career option. In the reporting period, DMRC CHB has successfully rehabilitated 12 children with job placements.
6


Festival celebration


Event and festival celebration is one of favorite activities of the children at the centre. These celebrations inculcate cultural and secular values among children. All children are very happy and energized during these celebrations. Children celebrated Lohri, Diwali, Christmas, New Year, Republic Day and Holi in the reporting period.
Trips and Tours
Curiosity and exploration is inherent in children. Through the means of recreation and excursions the children are helped to develop the power of observations, exploration, judgment and drawing inferences, and to develop the co-operative attitude and leadership skills in them. Children have been to various exposure visits during the reporting period.
Challenges
Centre faces following challenges in dealing with children on a regular basis.
1. Rehabilitation and restoration of children with special needs is a problem as there is a dearth of good aftercare organizations for such children. Establishing communication channels with children suffering from speech and hearing disabilities also requires special skills and efforts on the part of the staff and thus, poses a challenge.
2. Rehabilitation of juvenile in conflict with law also remains a challenge. These children who were once involved in criminal activities take time to adjust to a normal life.
3. Presence of behavioral issues due to substance use among children also creates problems. Addressing these issues by the counsellor and centre team takes a lot of psychological effort.
Future Plan


The DMRC CHB team has envisaged a clear future plan with set targets to further improve the outreach and quality of services at the centre.
To overcome the existing challenges
New admission of 10 children in regular school
Admission of 10 children in vocational training
Admission of two special children in Lady Noyce School
Making new strategies to prevent substance use
Networking to rehabilitate and better management of speech and hearing impaired child


Significant Change Story


A child named Vinod got admitted by an unknown person in very ill condition with severe bed sore and wounds in anal passage at LNJP Hospital. The child was then presented to CWC after discharge by Police and was brought to DMRC for further care. The doctor at the centre suggested regular dressing for bed sore and anal wounds in unconscious state as child was acutely malnourished. Though the dressing was done in-house but it was to be done under proper medical supervision. At the centre the child was provide proper medical care, dressing and highly nutritious diet. Child was then referred to GB Pant Hospital by LNJP for mental health analysis as he was passing stool and urine at bed only. After the diagnosis at GB Pant Hospital, doctor changed the drug regime and advised for high protein diet for him and recommended an exercise therapy for a week. After a week’s treatment, in-house doctor conducted a complete full body check-up and saw sign of recovery and normalcy. Presently, the child is on medication and recovering fast.
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Vocational Training
 
Strengthening the independent will of children and preparing them for a life of their own forms the key component of SBT's work. SBT's philosophy has been to encourage dreams and help transform them into reality –dreams of a job; a monthly salary; four walls to call your own and above all a future. Vocational training, job placement and rehabilitation become the major instruments to lead the minds of SBT children forward into ever-widening thought and action towards fulfilling their dreams. 
Vocational training SBT imparts vocational training for employable skill development and capacity building of growing children. Children above 16 years of age or ththose who clear their 10 board exam qualify for vocational training. Choice of vocational training course for a child is made keeping in mind the child's interest and realistic assessment of his/her abilities by a career counsellor and staff members. A measured attempt is made to match the child's skill and ability with the training course he/she opts for. The SBT team makes concerted efforts to enrol children in quality training courses in reputed institutes. The popular choices of courses have been Master Desk Top Publishing, web and graphic designing, multi-media animation, film editing, C++ software, care-giving, house-keeping, puppetry, karate, theatre, macramé and photography. Some of the institutes which provided training were ITI Pusa Road, NIIT, MAAC, Arena Multi-media, Crown Plaza, Taj Mahal Hotel-Mansingh Road, Vivek Sahni's Design House, The Ishara Puppet Theatre Trust, YMCA, Triveni Kala Sangam & Ramakrishna Institute of Computers.
“Education is not the answer but education linked with livelihoods is the answer for street children.” Ms. Praveen Nair, Chairperson and Trustee
Job placement and rehabilitation 
 
SBT has conceptualised an effective job placement and rehabilitation programme for reintegration of children who have grown-up/turned 18 into mainstream society. The programme not only has a definite goal to develop dreams and visions but also looks at dream modification and correction. Many a times, children develop unrealistic expectations which may not correspond to the skill sets they possess. It is common to hear children say 'I want to become an actor or a film director or a cricketer' though achievable these aspirations require inherent talent that all children may not have instead they may have abilities to excel in other professions. To address this aspect, as soon as a child turns 16, staff members strike up a conversation with the child around his/her career, regular meetings with the career counsellors are organised and a rehabilitation plan is drawn to prepare the child to step out of the protective auspices of residential centres. The implementation of rehabilitation plan includes interaction with the child steered by the career counsellor and the centre coordinator on a monthly basis. The focal points of these interactions are strengthening a child's resolve towards the career path he/she has chosen and whether the rehabilitation steps are panning out as per the plan or not. Preparation for rehabilitation of a child may be fraught with challenges for him/her as children are sceptical and scared about leading an independent life outside the centre; they may also become angry and hostile or may distance themselves from the staff members. These negative emotions and insecurity of young boys and girls at the threshold of maturity are understandable and staff members help them overcome these emotions by recurrent talks and assurances that SBT team would be a 'call away'. Role model interaction is another important aspect of SBT's rehabilitation programme. Role models are young adults rehabilitated by SBT, who have established themselves as successful professionals. They visit various residential centres periodically to interact with children who are soon to be rehabilitated and share their stories of 'doing well' in the outside world. These interactions offer a platform for young adults who have scores of questions about starting a life of their own in the outside world to get a measure of understanding. The most outstanding feature of these interactions is that they leave children with a feeling that 'If they (role models) can do it so can I' rousing them to work hard and make a mark of their own. 
Follow-up post rehabilitation 
 
Once a young adult finds a job, SBT staff arranges for basic requirements of the young adults to start a new life such as rations for a month, utensils, bedding etc. Even after the over 18 child is rehabilitated SBT team maintains contact with him/her to ensure that he/she finds stability and enjoyment in the work. The team also keeps in touch with the employers for a minimum of six months to ensure that rehabilitated persons have adjusted to the new work environment. Due to some unforeseen circumstances if a rehabilitated child quits his/her job, the team begins a process of placing such persons in new agencies. The process of replacement of a young adult is carried out again in cases where he/she expresses dissatisfaction with the second set-up as well. Thus,  efforts are put in to make a rehabilitated child self-reliant. In addition SBT also supports young adults who want to study further by incurring 50 percent of the course expense apart from facilitating the admission process. Similarly youths who look at upgradation of their vocational skills through advance courses are encouraged by SBT by making a contribution of upto 75 percent of the course fee. In cases of medical or other emergencies when rehabilitated youth need assistance, SBT provides them immediate succour till five years after their rehabilitation. The of age youth are introduced to a new life with a message that SBT team would be there with them till however long needed. It is because of this reason many children passing out of SBT keep coming to meet the staff members and trustees of the organisations forming a lasting relationship.

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Organization Information

Salaam Baalak Trust

Location: New Delhi, Delhi - India
Website:
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Project Leader:
Tanya Alag
New Delhi, Delhi India
$71,006 raised of $90,000 goal
 
739 donations
$18,994 to go
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