Rescue Unwanted and Abandoned Companion Birds

by Mickaboo Companion Bird Rescue
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Rescue Unwanted and Abandoned Companion Birds
Rescue Unwanted and Abandoned Companion Birds
Rescue Unwanted and Abandoned Companion Birds
Rescue Unwanted and Abandoned Companion Birds
Rescue Unwanted and Abandoned Companion Birds
Rescue Unwanted and Abandoned Companion Birds
Rescue Unwanted and Abandoned Companion Birds
Rescue Unwanted and Abandoned Companion Birds
Rescue Unwanted and Abandoned Companion Birds
Rescue Unwanted and Abandoned Companion Birds
Rescue Unwanted and Abandoned Companion Birds
Rescue Unwanted and Abandoned Companion Birds
Rescue Unwanted and Abandoned Companion Birds
Rescue Unwanted and Abandoned Companion Birds
Rescue Unwanted and Abandoned Companion Birds
Rescue Unwanted and Abandoned Companion Birds
Rescue Unwanted and Abandoned Companion Birds
Rescue Unwanted and Abandoned Companion Birds
Rescue Unwanted and Abandoned Companion Birds
Rescue Unwanted and Abandoned Companion Birds
Rescue Unwanted and Abandoned Companion Birds
Rescue Unwanted and Abandoned Companion Birds
Rescue Unwanted and Abandoned Companion Birds
Rescue Unwanted and Abandoned Companion Birds
Rescue Unwanted and Abandoned Companion Birds
Rescue Unwanted and Abandoned Companion Birds
Rescue Unwanted and Abandoned Companion Birds
Rescue Unwanted and Abandoned Companion Birds
Rescue Unwanted and Abandoned Companion Birds
Rescue Unwanted and Abandoned Companion Birds
Rescue Unwanted and Abandoned Companion Birds
Rescue Unwanted and Abandoned Companion Birds
Rescue Unwanted and Abandoned Companion Birds
Rescue Unwanted and Abandoned Companion Birds
Rescue Unwanted and Abandoned Companion Birds
Rescue Unwanted and Abandoned Companion Birds
Rescue Unwanted and Abandoned Companion Birds
Rescue Unwanted and Abandoned Companion Birds
Rescue Unwanted and Abandoned Companion Birds
Rescue Unwanted and Abandoned Companion Birds
Rescue Unwanted and Abandoned Companion Birds
Rescue Unwanted and Abandoned Companion Birds
Rescue Unwanted and Abandoned Companion Birds
Rescue Unwanted and Abandoned Companion Birds
Rescue Unwanted and Abandoned Companion Birds
Rescue Unwanted and Abandoned Companion Birds
Rescue Unwanted and Abandoned Companion Birds
Rescue Unwanted and Abandoned Companion Birds
Rescue Unwanted and Abandoned Companion Birds
Rescue Unwanted and Abandoned Companion Birds
Rescue Unwanted and Abandoned Companion Birds
Rescue Unwanted and Abandoned Companion Birds
Rescue Unwanted and Abandoned Companion Birds
Rescue Unwanted and Abandoned Companion Birds
Rescue Unwanted and Abandoned Companion Birds
Bluebelle, a car-struck budgie, "before"
Bluebelle, a car-struck budgie, "before"

It might take a while before they can learn to give us their trust. They are surrendered by owners and shelters.  Sometimes they come to us as strays. Some just need a warm, welcoming home and open heart. Others need veterinary care. And many need the lifeline that Mickaboo can provide.

Mickaboo strives to educate people about companion birds to ensure the birds have a safe, loving environment for life. It stands ready to provide assistance and refuge to those in need.

So far this year, 391 birds were surrendered to us; we found permanent homes for 358 members of our foster flock.

We delight in seeing birds come out of their shells, socialize, grow back broken and plucked plumage, or finally decide that eating those fruit and veggie things isn’t so bad after all. And in the end, uniting these birds with a loving owner and forever home…we know it’s worth it. That happiness and gratitude manifests itself in many ways. A whistled greeting. A gentle nibble. A bowed head seeking a skritch or two.

Happy endings would not be possible without the time and energy put in by our outstanding volunteers who teach bird care classes, make phone calls and conduct home visits, construct bird toys, and transport birds and supplies all over Northern California. These birds would not be able to overcome bad diets, diseases or behavioral issues without the dedication put in by our foster parents. And above all, the veterinary care that we are able to provide these birds would not be feasible without the generosity of our donors.

As you pause to reflect on your giving this season, please consider making a one-time or recurring donation to Mickaboo. Your support makes a world of difference for our feathered friends. Don’t forget to spread the word about the joy of companion birds – don’t breed, don’t buy, ADOPT!

Wishing you a season of joy and a New Year full of prosperity.

Bluebelle, with her new cast
Bluebelle, with her new cast
Bluebelle, "after" treatment - all better!
Bluebelle, "after" treatment - all better!

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Rocky has taken King under his wing - literally!
Rocky has taken King under his wing - literally!

Many thanks to those of you who recently donated to Mickaboo! Because of your generosity and others, Mickaboo collected enough funds in the last week or so (centered around Global Giving Bonus Day) to pay for about three weeks of veterinary expenses - a wonderful gift.

I'd like to give you an update about the scarlet macaw featured on our Global Giving page, one of the birds you help with your donation.  King is one of Mickaboo's 600+ foster birds available for adoption. Mickaboo rehabilitates its foster birds, both physically and socially, to the extent possible and necessary to enable them to find new homes. King is continuing to learn how to trust humans and to heal his battered soul in the care of one of our volunteer foster parents.  Recently this volunteer started caring for another macaw, a Blue and Gold named Rocky. This report's photo shows King and Rocky have become close friends - Rocky has taken King under his wing, both figuratively and literally.  In the same way, a significant part of Mickaboo's activities is around taking abused, neglected, or abandoned companion birds under its wing (as well as to educate the public about responsible bird ownership) - and we thank you for enabling us to continue to do so.

To learn more about King, Rocky and the rest of our foster flock - and to sign up to adopt any of them - go to our online bird listing. Want to learn more about bird care?  Our reading room has several articles about bird behavior, safe and nonsafe plants and foods, and more!  Finally, read our latest quarterly newsletter, written by Mickaboo's volunteers, for more about what Mickaboo does and the latest in responsible avian care.

If you plan to be in the San Francisco Bay Area on December 3, join us at our Annual Holiday Party!

Thank you again for your generosity, and enabling Mickaboo to continue its mission on behalf of our feathered friends!

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Aggie, a Senegal
Aggie, a Senegal

Dear Mickaboo Friends,
 
Our Fall edition of Mickaboo's newsletter features useful information and news about the birds and events you help support.  Read stories about our rescue activities and MORE!

And, we have a rare matching gift opportunity! From Oct 18, 9 pm PT to Oct 19, 9 pm PT (i.e., the full calendar day of October 19 in Eastern Time Zone terms), GlobalGiving will match your online donations at 30%, up to $1,000 per donor per project, until Global Giving has given away $100,000 of matching funds for all of its projects. Go to Mickaboo's Global Giving page to take advantage of this opportunity.

Your donations help birds in our care like Aggie the Senegal parrot (pictured). While Aggie is a fun-loving little bird who wants to interact with people, something happened in her past that made her very nervous and excitable. She has pulled out or chewed up many of her own feathers, including those on her wings and tail. This has affected her balance and made her prone to fall. Aggie's foster parent is working with Aggie to help calm her down so she can grow her feathers back and socialize calmly like she should, but this will take a lot of behavioral work and supportive care. Aggie has undergone minor surgery to hopefully correct her issues with plucking.

Would you consider taking advantage of this matching gift opportunity and help pay the vet bills for Aggie and many other birds like her?

P.S. Your gift may *also* be eligible for matching by your employer! Send any matching gift forms to Global Giving for processing.

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Travis and Monkey, Lovebirds
Travis and Monkey, Lovebirds

Because of your help, Mickaboo has recently lifted its general moratorium on intake of new birds. Our financial and human resources continue to be stretched thin, but, thanks to our many supporters around the world and our army of kind-hearted and tireless volunteers, we are able to take in more companion birds who need our help.

We still have some special challenges with our larger bird population. We have far too many macaws for our current supply of foster homes, for example, and we are having difficulties finding permanent homes for Amazons and Wild Flock cherryhead conures. All of these big, wonderful birds need special homes with very special families. If you are interested in learning more about the very largest of our big birds, or if you think you know someone that could become a forever home for a big bird, please let us know of your interest. You can contact mail@mickaboo.org or the species coordinators for these birds.

To everyone that has donated to help pay the overwhelming costs of treating the many sick and injured birds we have taken in, thank you from all of us that love and foster these birds while we work to find them forever homes. You make it possible for us to continue doing this difficult and wonderful work. Here is the story of two birds we were able to help recently because of YOUR help:

Travis is the one with orange feathers.  He is a Lutino Peach Faced Lovebird and used to be yellow with peach face.  The vet is not sure what is causing the abnormal feather color. This feather color abnormality generally happens to female lovebirds and those who are on a seed diet. That said, Travis' blood work does not indicate fatty liver disease. He is also underweight, with his keel showing prominently.


Monkey has a cyst-like growth just below her left eye. Fortunately it is not inside her eye. We are hoping to have the growth removed surgically. It has been drained twice but fills right back up.The fluid inside was tested and no cancerous cells were found.


Both birds will have to undergo frequent vet visits and expensive treatment. Please consider making a recurring donation to help cover their veterinary bills and those of the many other birds we help.  It's easy to do!  Sign up for a recurring donation here: http://www.globalgiving.org/projects/rescue-unwanted-and-abandoned-companion-birds/ . Be sure to click on the “monthly recurring” option below the large orange “donate” button.  Read instructions for setting up a recurring donation here.

 Thank you again for your generosity, from all of us and our foster flock.

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Bluebelle, a severely injured budgie
Bluebelle, a severely injured budgie

Mickaboo’s July 2011 newsletter has just been published!  See stories about what your contribution has enabled Mickaboo to do to help our feathered friends, a scrumptious birdie muffin recipe, and more!

We cannot thank you enough for your donations, both during the recent Global Giving matching campaign and otherwise.  The success of our mission depends entirely on the generosity of people like you - we have no funding from corporate or government sources.  Bluebelle (a budgie, picture attached) is a case in point.  Bluebelle had a run-in with something, most likely a car, but no one knows for sure. Thanks to the quick actions of the shelter to which she was first brought, Mickaboo volunteers and one fantastic avian veterinarian she may live to tell us what happened. When she was first brought to the vet her prognosis was not good - no one thought she would survive. She had multiple head injuries, a fractured leg and was completely unresponsive. Since then she has made a remarkable recovery and will need continued extensive care to continue recovering.

To learn more about Bluebelle and the rest of our foster flock - and to sign up to adopt any of them - go to our online bird listing. Want to learn more about bird care?  Our reading room has several articles about bird behavior, safe and unsafe plants and foods, and more! 

Thank you again for your generosity, and enabling Mickaboo to continue its mission to help our feathered friends!

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Organization Information

Mickaboo Companion Bird Rescue

Location: San Jose, CA - USA
Website:
Facebook: Facebook Page
Project Leader:
Pamela Lee
San Jose, California United States
$562,985 raised of $580,000 goal
 
6,254 donations
$17,015 to go
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