Improved Care and Protection of Girl Children

by Salaam Baalak Trust
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Improved Care and Protection of Girl Children
Improved Care and Protection of Girl Children
Improved Care and Protection of Girl Children
Improved Care and Protection of Girl Children
Improved Care and Protection of Girl Children
Improved Care and Protection of Girl Children
Improved Care and Protection of Girl Children
Improved Care and Protection of Girl Children
Improved Care and Protection of Girl Children
Improved Care and Protection of Girl Children
Improved Care and Protection of Girl Children
Improved Care and Protection of Girl Children
Improved Care and Protection of Girl Children
Improved Care and Protection of Girl Children
Improved Care and Protection of Girl Children
Improved Care and Protection of Girl Children
Improved Care and Protection of Girl Children
Improved Care and Protection of Girl Children
Improved Care and Protection of Girl Children
Improved Care and Protection of Girl Children
Improved Care and Protection of Girl Children
Improved Care and Protection of Girl Children
Improved Care and Protection of Girl Children
Improved Care and Protection of Girl Children
Improved Care and Protection of Girl Children
Improved Care and Protection of Girl Children
Improved Care and Protection of Girl Children
Improved Care and Protection of Girl Children
Improved Care and Protection of Girl Children
Improved Care and Protection of Girl Children
Improved Care and Protection of Girl Children
Improved Care and Protection of Girl Children
Improved Care and Protection of Girl Children
Improved Care and Protection of Girl Children
Improved Care and Protection of Girl Children
Improved Care and Protection of Girl Children
Improved Care and Protection of Girl Children
Improved Care and Protection of Girl Children
Improved Care and Protection of Girl Children
Improved Care and Protection of Girl Children
Improved Care and Protection of Girl Children
Improved Care and Protection of Girl Children
Improved Care and Protection of Girl Children
Improved Care and Protection of Girl Children
Improved Care and Protection of Girl Children
Improved Care and Protection of Girl Children
Improved Care and Protection of Girl Children
Improved Care and Protection of Girl Children
Improved Care and Protection of Girl Children
Improved Care and Protection of Girl Children
Improved Care and Protection of Girl Children
Improved Care and Protection of Girl Children
Improved Care and Protection of Girl Children
Improved Care and Protection of Girl Children
Improved Care and Protection of Girl Children
Improved Care and Protection of Girl Children
Improved Care and Protection of Girl Children
Improved Care and Protection of Girl Children
Improved Care and Protection of Girl Children
Improved Care and Protection of Girl Children
Improved Care and Protection of Girl Children
Improved Care and Protection of Girl Children
Improved Care and Protection of Girl Children
Improved Care and Protection of Girl Children
Improved Care and Protection of Girl Children
Improved Care and Protection of Girl Children
Improved Care and Protection of Girl Children
Improved Care and Protection of Girl Children
Improved Care and Protection of Girl Children
Improved Care and Protection of Girl Children
Improved Care and Protection of Girl Children
Improved Care and Protection of Girl Children
Improved Care and Protection of Girl Children
Improved Care and Protection of Girl Children
Improved Care and Protection of Girl Children
Improved Care and Protection of Girl Children
Improved Care and Protection of Girl Children
activities being conducted to keep the girls busy
activities being conducted to keep the girls busy

Aarushi Children’s Home is run by Salaam Baalak Trust (SBT) for girls in need of care and protection. Located in Gurgaon, Haryana,The  home provides residential services which includes a safe environment, education, food, health care, skill development, Vocational Training, Career Counseling, Mental Health Support, Job placement and Rehabilitation.

Activities:

Health and hygiene-

During this period 59 girls were provided three hot cooked meal, fruits, eggs, milk, nuts etc. They are also being provided with various supplements like vitamin C, Iron , calcium etc. 12 girls were diagnosed with some  physical and mental health issues were provided with an extra nutritious diet. Extra hygiene is being maintained through regular cleaning and sanitization of the premises especially during these difficult times.

Education-

Education plays an important role in a child’s growth. Considering this importance all the girls who can be part of formal schooling are enrolled in school, so 28 girls are continuing their education through schools. Five girls are studying through NIOS and 26 girls were provided classes through Non Formal Education in the home itself with our trained teachers and staff.

Vocational Training and Rehabilitation-

 During the Pandemic most of the vocational training institutes have been closed. But keeping in mind that the girls after a certain age need to be rehabilitated. We have been able to enrolled one girl  in computer classes, and another girl was enrolled in a beauty culture course. One girl received job training in a cosmetics company and one has done a month’s bakery course. Girls go to different institutes to do their courses.

Maintenance and Repair-

Aarushi’s structure is big and we need to get regular maintenance and repair work of the building -  So the girls can have a safe and clean space to live in. During this period all the required repairs were done. Although is has been difficult since all the children were at the shelter due to the pandemic.

Regular electricity and clean  water is available at the centre.

Security at the home

24*7 security is required to ensure the safety of the girls residing in the premises. Two guards are appointed in 2 shifts. They control all the movements to ensure proper safety inside the centre.

Staff ensures  that during these hard times , everyone is engaged in various activities which boost their energy and helps them in their mental health. During this period girls were engaged in activities like computer classes, vedicMaths, Debate, quiz, dance, painting , and meditation etc. All conducted in house 

pics from the homes
pics from the homes
activities being conducted to keep the girls busy
activities being conducted to keep the girls busy
pics from the homes
pics from the homes
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Introduction


Aarushi Children’s Home (CHG) is run by Salaam Baalak Trust (SBT) for girls in need of care and protection in Gurugram, Haryana. A 24*7 children’s home, Aarushi CHG provides residential as well care and protection services for children. Going beyond care and protection, Aarushi team also provides skill development services for girls for their holistic and all-round development. The home is run by a team of professional team comprising of a Coordinator, counselor, medical social worker and social workers.
Aarushi CHG is an inclusive set up where both neuro-typical and children with developmental difficulties reside. EGIS’s support to Aarushi CHG has enabled provisions of healthy food for girls rescued from streets and difficult circumstances. With the help of the project, 62 girls at Aarushi CHG have been able to access holistic nutrition for overall growth and development. The support includes three cooked meals on a daily basis.

Progress Overview

A progress overview of the services being supported under the project has been presented in the following section.
Health and Nutrition: Access to quality health is one of the basic rights of children intrinsically linked to their survival and development. Girls rescued from difficult circumstances live in vulnerable conditions and often suffer from malnutrition and other infections. Thus, ensuring good health of girls is one of the focal areas of work for Aarushi team.
To this end, girls at Aarushi CHG are provided with three hot cooked meals, fruits, milk, eggs and other nutritious meals. Girls who need better health care are provided supplementary nutritious diet to improve their health.
The menu is prepared in consultation with children so that the food of their choice can be included. It is taken care that each meal has a nutritional value and is a blend of proteins, carbohydrate and fiber and at the same time is appealing to the children. During the lockdown, staff and children did engage in non-fire cooking sessions too so that the children feel occupied and productive.
During the reporting period, there were in total 12 children who required special nutrition as they were having physical and mental health issues. Two girls were sent by CWC who were minors and were pregnant. They were provided with nutritious food and medicinal supplements prescribed by the doctor.

Mental Health:

Sound mental health is another important aspect of a child’s personality. Every child requires psychological and emotional support and more so those required from difficult circumstances as they come with a lot of emotional baggage and suppressed trauma. Recognizing the importance of psychological well-being, Aarushi CHG has in place a strong mental health programme. As part of the programme, a full time Psychologist is there to help the girls in the center through individual and group sessions and career counseling. During the reporting period, six girls with special needs were provided specialized therapies like Autism, Depression, Schizophrenia, Behavior issues, about 12 girls were given support for career counseling and 25 girls were provided groups sessions.


Challenges


• There are limited opportunities to constructively engage children with disabilities.
• New challenges are emerging due to COVID- 19 pandemic. Movement of staff was restricted for some time during this period and they were staff shortage initially.
• Children have been home bound since the past 7 months and many children developed psychological problems.

Future plans


• In the times to come, the focus would be to constructively engage the children by involving more volunteers who can take group sessions with children having similar interests.
• The focus would also be to boost up the immunity of the children and to keep them healthy and secure.
• The infrastructure for online classes needs to be upgraded so that the children keep pace with the school and the extracurricular work too.


Case Study


Five months ago, Meera (name changed) came to Aarushi CHG and was visually impaired. She was raped by her father and was pregnant. After many years of abuse, she did file a complaint with the police and her father was detained. Her mother who worked as a house help was supportive of her decision but had no financial means to take care of her pregnant girl and termination of pregnancy was not possible. The girl initially was quite disturbed. She was having difficulty coping in the new environment. With the support of Aarushi’s team and children, she started settling down gradually. She was provided with nutritious food at small intervals and the doctor would do regular checkup. A dedicated caretaker was hired who would make sure that she would eat on time and would engage with other girls too. She finally delivered a healthy baby boy who was later put for adoption. Meera has been restored to her mother as per her decision and her mother found a better job and can take care of Meera. The team at Aarushi is in contact with the family and does regular follow up and is looking for vocational training opportunities for her.

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Introduction-

Salaam Baalak Trust’s residential centres are 24*7 programmes which provide shelter (long- term and/ or short-term) and a package of childcare services based on continuum of care approachtochildrenrescuedfromthestreets.Theseservicesincludemedicalcare,foodand nutrition (three hot cooked meals and evening nutrition), psychological support, education, vocational training, job placement, restoration and rehabilitation. The centres also provide sports and latent talent development opportunities for all round development of children. These residential centres are recognized and licensed under the Integrated Child Protection Scheme(ICPS)andtheJuvenileJusticeAct,2015.Theadmissionandcareplanofeachchildis made under the guidance of respective Child Welfare Committees(CWCs).

 SBT Residential Centres

SBT has 7 residential centres for children from street and vulnerable situations. The centres have the basic infrastructure –classrooms, play area, computer lab and dormitories. Each centre has a team of trained and compassionate caregivers who work towards the holistic development of the children residing in these homes.

 

Brief overview of the centres-

Centre

Catering to Boys or

Girls

Brief Overview

Aasra

Boys

Aasra was the first shelter home started by SBT. With a capacity of 50 it caters to boys of five to 18 years. It is an inclusive set up where children with disabilities and typically developing children reside together.

Apna Ghar

Boys

Itis a short stay centre, where 40 children come and stay for short duration and then they are either restored or transferred  in a long

stay home. The home was set under the JJ Act, 2000.

DMRC

Boys

DMRC Children’s Home was established as part of Delhi Metro Rail Corporation’s corporate   social responsibility.  The home

houses 125 boys from the age of five to below 18 years.

Old Delhi Railway Station (ODRS) Open Shelter

Boys

ODRS open shelter is an open centre catering to 30 boys. It is a short stay centre, where children come stay short duration and then they areeitherrestoredorpostedinalongstayhome.Thehomewas

set under the JJ Act, 2000.

Arushi

Girls

Arushi was first girls’ shelter home under SBT. It is an initiative to offer 24 hour shelter to 50 girls between the ages of five years to18 years living on the streets.

Udaan

Girls

Udaan was started in the year 2010. It started with eight girls and currently shelters 80 girls at a time.

 

Key Activities and Progress Update-

 

Residential Care

 A safe space is the most critical need for any child to realise his/her own full potential. Thus, we started residential programmes to provide safe child friendly shelter for children rescued from street situations and any other distress situations.Children residing in these homes have a sense of belonging and call it their own home.

 Nutrition

To meet the nutritional needs of children, nutritionally-balanced and hot-cooked meals are served at residential. The meals are prepared in the kitchen space provided at the centre under the supervision of staff members to ensure safe and hygienic practices. In some cases, children have special nutritional requirements due to illness such as tuberculosis and malnutrition. Such children are provided with special nutrition including protein supplements, additional servings of fruits and milk as prescribed by the doctor.

 Education

Education is integral to any child’s development and hence all the children residing in the homes are connected with education either through formal, non-formal or open school of learning depending on the strength of the child. Each centre has an in-house teacher who helps the children with their home work and also teaches the children who are studying through open learning.

 Medical Care

Children on the streets live in unsanitary conditions and are prone to various infections and diseases. Therefore, regular medical check-ups of the children are done at the full care residential centres. Individual health cards are maintained for each child. Whenever required, pathological tests are conducted as per the recommendation of the doctors. We have a full-time doctor employed with SBT solely for this purpose. Apart from that we also invite external doctors or get our children treated by specialists at hospitals.

 Mental Health-

 Full-time mental health professionals appointed in the centre provides psychological support and counseling to children. The mental health and psychological support helps children rescued from the streets get over their traumatic past. There are a team of 9 psychologists with a senior Psychiatrist who work towards the management plan of children having psychological difficulties.

 Vocational Training and Job Placement -

Children who are above 16 and/or have completed Class10 are linked to a wide range of vocational training courses. A career counselor matches children’s skill sets and interest with suitable courses. Based on counselor’s recommendation children join vocational courses of their choice. Children at SBT centres often opt for computer, travel and tourism, fashion designing, beauty culture and hotel management courses. Upon completion of their vocational training courses children are also assisted in finding gainful employment. The centre teams help children in applying forjobs.

 

 Restoration and Rehabilitation: Those children who are missing or run away from their homes often long for their families. The centre teams in conjunction with the CHILDLINE and police make efforts to find homes and families of these children and reunite them with their parents.

 

For those children who live in the residential centres till they turn 18, a proper rehabilitation plan is drawn. These young adults are not only linked to jobs butarealsosupportedinfindinganewaccommodationandareprovidedbasicnecessitiesto start a life such as bedding utensils and financial assistance for buying groceries and pay rent for up to three months. Rehabilitation is SBT’s carefully planned attempt to reintegrate the children back into societies as productive adults and responsiblecitizens.

 

A snapshot of services provided by the residential centres from January – June 2020 has been presented in the Table below.

 Activities

Number of Children

Shelter Provided

809 children

Restoration

370 children

Education (Formal Schooling)

150 children

Open Schooling

28 children

Non-Formal Education

524 children

Food and Nutrition

809 children

Health Check Up

761 children

Skill Development and Vocational Training

25 children

Job Placement

11 children

Rehabilitation

05 children

 

Challenges

Due to the Pandemic, there are limited opportunities for children to be constructively engaged There was a surge in mental health concerns of children and staff since the movement and the daily routine has been disturbed.

 

Initially, only few staff members could come to work and this led to classes being irregular. Younger children are particularly being affected due to the lockdowns as its difficult for them to comprehend the scenario.

 

Future Plan:

The effort is to keep all the children in the homes safe during the pandemic and at the same time to work towards their physical and mental health.

 

SBT is also working to upgrade the digital infrastructure at each home so that the children don’t miss out on the academic front.

 

Mental health team is working proactively with both the children and the staff and has increased the number of life skill sessions.


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Children are our present and tomorrow. They represent the future of the country, thus, investments in their survival, growth and development are imperative. India as a nation upholds the rights of children as they need care, protection and nurturing. The country also ratified the United Nations Convention of the Rights of Children (UNCRC), 1989 pledging commitment to protect fundamental rights of children to survival, life, development, protection and participation. In line with this vision, various policy and legislative steps have been taken to ensure well-being of children including, the National Policy for Children, 2013 and the National Plan of Action for Children, 2016, the Juvenile Justice (Care and Protection of Children) Protection Act, 2016 and launch of the Child Protection Services (earlier known as the Integrated Child Protection Services) among others.

Despite these progressive steps, many children in India still live in difficult circumstances such as runway and missing children, street children, child labourers and those with disabilities. To protect the rights of these children, Salaam Baalak Trust (SBT) began its interventions in Delhiand NCR more than 30 years ago. Since then, the Trust has been striving to provide equal opportunities to these children to enable themto grow and thrive and be at par with the children from so called privileged backgrounds.

Education, health, nutrition and vocational training and social reintegration are some of the critical services SBT provides to children rescued from difficult circumstances. SBT offers these critical services through its children’s homes and contact points (day-care centres). The children’s home of SBT are 24*7 residential centres. They form the central platform through which various services are offered to children. Arushi is one of the first children’s home for girls initiated by SBT. The Home provides inclusive care and protection services to girls rescued from streets and difficult circumstances.

Education at Arushi is viewed as a means to enable children realise their intellectual potential, develop social skills and prepare for vocational training and jobs. Linking children to formal education is one of the first steps to make children a part of mainstream society, where they interact, learn and compete with their peers. However, many girls at Arushi hail from impoverished and deprived families and some of them are victims of violence, emotional and psychological abuse. The difficult past of these girls leaves them vulnerable and emotional. They are most often deprived of their right to education and with little or no experience of formal schooling. Many of them are first generation learners.

In such a scenario, rekindling their spirit to learn and study, requires a sensitive and caring approach. Continuous handholding and individual attention, lies at the heart of this approach.The education programme at Arushi aims at providing girls academic support and services tailor-made to their individual needs. The different modes of education offered at the centre include formal schooling, non-formal education and open schooling. Teachers with the support of the volunteers take regular in-house classes for children.They play the role of parents, attending parent-teacher meets, and ensuring that the child is not discriminated in any way in school.

Active collaborations with multiple reputed schools, like Lawrence, Sanawar; Shiksha Bharti; Bharti Vidya Bhavan etc., provides the children with better opportunities and greater exposure. Children with special needs and learning disabilities are given support to blossom to their best abilities. Towards this end, SBT has networked with schools such as ORKIDS, Manovikas, and Amar Jyoti. SBT seeks support for running its on-going education programme.

Under the education programme at Arushi following services are provided:

  • Formal Schooling: Formal schooling involves enrolling children in schools and linking them to mainstream education. The girls at Arushi are studying in different schools including, Rotary Public School, ST. Crispin Senior Secondary School, Kitty Garden Public School and Universal Public School and Arsha Public School. The school-going girls at Arushi are supported through in-house classes conducted by SBT teachers. During these classes, thegirls complete their school homework and assignments and also revise their school syllabi for exam preparation.
  • Non-formal education (NFE): NFE classes are aimed at children who have either not been to school or are drop outs. Since, these children cannot be enrolled into a formal school immediately, they are provided NFE to prepare them for school education. Thus, NFE becomes the first step towards mainstreaming a child into the society. Use of various activities and teaching aids made the NFE classes joyous and impactful.
  • Open schooling is Open schooling is offered to those girls who are not inclined towards regular school education and express a strong desire for pursuing vocational and skill development course. These girls are enrolled under National Institute of Open School (NIOS) and are prepared for exams for milestone classes, namely class 10 and 12.
  • Career counselling is provided to girls who are in their late teens to prepare them for higher education and skill development.
  • Computer and other extracurricular activities also form an integral part of Arushi’s education programme. Computer training, art and craft, public speaking and creative writing sessions are regularly conducted for overall personality development of children.
  • Education material and stationery: Girls are regularly providededucation material and stationery including school books, notebooks and other material such as coloured sheets, Fevicol etc.
  • Tracking progress: Arushi teachers and Education Coordinator closely track the academic progress of children by maintaining their progress reports documenting in detail their initial competencies and skills and progress then on. This detailed tracking helps to identify strengths and weak areas for each child and do course corrections and modifications in present teaching plan and strategies. For instance, some children do well in Mathematics and sciences but face difficulties in languages, they need to be provided extra support in these subjects and vice versa.

    The expected outcomes of the project concern with bringing a transformation in girls’ lives. These are listed below.

    • Girls enrolled in Arushi will go to schools or open schools, measurement through enrolment rates and attendance register
    • They are enrolled in Arushi show improvement in their academic performance, measurement through report cards, performances on test and successful transition rates
    • They are able to pursue skill development courses and secure jobs, girls enrolled in skill development course

Testimonials of Change

Meera (name changed) a 16 year old came to Arushi Children’s Home for Girls from a Christian NGO. Unaware of her family background and home town, Meera came to Arushi Home nervous and tensed. Initially, she remained sad and lonely. Amidst new people and new environment, Meera felt alienated and upset. She also had behavioural issues and had difficulty mingling with other children.

Given her difficult situation, the Arushi team focused on making Meera comfortable and helping her lead a normal life. To help Meera open up, the counsellor conducted regular sessions with her. The team involved her in various activities and extra-curricular sessions and took her for exposure visits around the city. These efforts bore fruit and Meera slowly came out of her shell. She seemed visibly happy and positive and began interacting with other children and Arushi team. Meera actively took part in different activities at the Home and voiced her concerns and thoughts.

While having a heart to heart conversation with a team member, she mentioned about her dream of securing a good job in a big company. The team motivated her to focus on studies. Meera began attending regular in-house classes and diligently studied. Even though Meera was enrolled in a school, she was having difficulties coping up with school curriculum. The team realised that Meera had remained out of school for a very long period of time and found it difficult to adjust to the classroom setting. Therefore instead of a regular school, Meera was enrolled in National Institute of Open Schooling. The strategy worked for her. While Meera is working hard to complete her studies, she is maximising the use of her time by interning at Google Cafeteria’s service section. She considers this as her first step towards realising her dream of working in a big company.

Meera is still a shy and quiet girl but she has certainly shed off her inhibitions. She has transformed herself into a cooperative and ambitious young girl and is determined to achieve her aspirations. Arushi team is sure that she will be successful in her life and emerge victorious. 

 

 

 

 

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We take this opputunity to thanks ALL or donors for their support 


The funding support to Arushi Children Home for Girls has enabled provisions of critical services for girls rescued from streets and difficult circumstances. Arushi being one of the first girls’ children home initiated by Salaam Baalak Trust strives to provide a multifarious package of services for holistic development of girls. Apart from education, health and nutrition, computer
literacy and skill development form an essential part of services package at Arushi. With the help of the supported project girls at Arushi have been able to access education, skill development and other extracurricular services including exposure visits and excursions. The sustained provision of these classes has enabled overall growth and development of girls. Along with their intellectual development, girls’ personalities are also improving. They are becoming
more confident and capable of making informed choices.

Progress Overview
A progress overview of the services being supported under the project has been presented in the
following section.


Education: Education is one of the most important components of service package provided at Arushi. Education is instrumental for academic development and character building of students.
Since Arushi caters to girls from different socioeconomic background with often little of no exposure to schools. To meet the multifarious needs of education of girls, Arushi team provides education through formal, non-formal and open schooling. Formal schooling involves enrolling children in schools and linking them to mainstream education. In the reporting period, 31 girls have been provided formal schooling. They are studying in different schools including, Rotary Public School, ST. Crispin Senior Secondary School, Kitty Garden Public School and Universal Public School and Arsha Public School. These children are supported at Arushi Home through in-house classes conducted by SBT teachers. During these classes, school going children complete their school homework and assignments and also revise their school syllabi for exam preparation.

Non-formal education (NFE): NFE classes are aimed at children who have either not been to school or are drop outs. Since, these children cannot be enrolled into a formal school immediately, they are provided NFE to prepare them for school education. Thus, NFE becomes the first step towards mainstreaming a child into the society. During the reporting period, 43 girls
were provided NFE. Use of various activities and teaching aids made the NFE classes joyous and impactful. In the reporting period one girl made successful transition from non-formal to formal schooling.
Open schooling is offered to those girls who are not inclined towards regular school education and express a strong desire for pursuing vocational and skill development course. Five girls are studying through National Institute of Open Schooling (NIOS) and are preparing for their exams.

Vocational training and job placement: Girls at the threshold of adulthood are prepared and counselled for career development. Once they turn 16, they are linked to skill development and vocational training courses. The process of preparing girls for vocational training begins at the age of 15. The girls along with the career counsellor conduct a realistic career assessment based on their skills, interest and aptitude and then discuss the vocational training avenues available to them. During the reporting period, three girls have been enrolled into computer classes. They have completed their course successfully. One girl is learning theatre, two girls are doing gym training and one girl doing receptionist training.

Rehabilitation: In the reporting period, four girls turning 18 were rehabilitated. The rehabilitation process involves preparing girls for an independent life outside the children’s home. The preparation involves psychological and career counselling sessions with girls. The team also searches for a safe accommodation for girls to stay on their own. Of the four girls who have been
rehabilitated have been enrolled for higher studies, one girl has secured a job as a beautician and one girl is working in the hospitality sector. The Arushi team is in regular touch with girls for consistent follow up.


Annual excursion: In the year 2019, the annual tour was organised at Nainital – one of the popular hill stations in the State of Uttarakhand. A total of 31 girls were taken for the excursion. It was an entertaining and enriching experience for the girls. The tour was scheduled for four days. It offered an opportunity for children and staff to interact and become friendlier with each other. During the excursion girls visited famous sight-seeing spots in Nainital including the
picturesque Saat Taal – A pristine lake. The girls stayed in a cottage amidst the mountains, the cottage exuded the serenity of nature. The children and Arushi team relaxed at the cottage and played indoor games such as kho-kho and badminton. The girls then went to another beautiful lake called Nal Damayanti Lake. They were excited and enthusiastic to catch the fish in the lake.
Those who could swim enjoyed swimming under the supervision of staff members. It was as if girls had developed an immediate liking to the lakes in Nainital. They were elated at the idea of visiting another majestic and famous tourist attraction called Naukuchia Taal. Here they enjoyed
boating along with the team members.
Exposed to the scenic beauty of Uttarakhand, the girls then visited a zoo along with the younger children. 
 The girls bonded well and learnt to adjust with each other. This inculcated a
feeling of collectiveness and sharing and caring among them. Many team building exercises were done to strengthen their rapport with each other and staff members. 

Challenges and opportunities: The Arushi team grapples with funding crunch for linking girls to various life skill and latent talent development activities. To address this challenge, the team is mobilising individual donations and also looking out for affordable options to link girls to various hobby and other courses. The team also faces difficulties in providing specialised care to children with disabilities. These children need lot of care and affection as well as time. The staff is multi-tasking and building capacities to meet the complex and multifarious needs.

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Organization Information

Salaam Baalak Trust

Location: New Delhi, Delhi - India
Website:
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Project Leader:
Tanya Alag
New Delhi, Delhi India
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