Protect Coral Reefs in Malaysia

by Reef Check Malaysia
Play Video
Protect Coral Reefs in Malaysia
Protect Coral Reefs in Malaysia
Protect Coral Reefs in Malaysia
Protect Coral Reefs in Malaysia
Protect Coral Reefs in Malaysia
Protect Coral Reefs in Malaysia
Protect Coral Reefs in Malaysia
Protect Coral Reefs in Malaysia
Protect Coral Reefs in Malaysia
Protect Coral Reefs in Malaysia
Protect Coral Reefs in Malaysia
Protect Coral Reefs in Malaysia
Protect Coral Reefs in Malaysia
Protect Coral Reefs in Malaysia
Protect Coral Reefs in Malaysia
Protect Coral Reefs in Malaysia
Protect Coral Reefs in Malaysia
Protect Coral Reefs in Malaysia
Protect Coral Reefs in Malaysia
Protect Coral Reefs in Malaysia
Protect Coral Reefs in Malaysia
Protect Coral Reefs in Malaysia
Protect Coral Reefs in Malaysia
Protect Coral Reefs in Malaysia
Protect Coral Reefs in Malaysia

Happy 15 years of Reef Check Malaysia!

 

Reef Check Malaysia just celebrated its 15th year last week.

 

"Today, 3rd August, marks the 15th anniversary of Reef Check Malaysia. Who would have thought that an organisation that started off with one full time staff would grow into an organisation with national programmes and field staff in four locations (and counting!!)"

 

Continue reading our General Manager, Julian Hyde reflecting on the last 15 years in the link below.

 

Thank you to all of our funders, volunteers and supporters. We are deeply grateful and always recognise your role in protecting our coral reefs.

Links:

Share on Twitter Share on Facebook

Tioman Island produces a lot of waste glass – mainly food condiments glass bottle and alcoholic drinks glass bottle. Glass is not biodegradable and has to be heated up to 1,500 degrees to be recycled. In addition, there is colour separation – bottles of different colours cannot be mixed. Together with limited end market usage for glass, low reselling price and production cost, many recyclers on mainland focus on materials that give them the most returns, like plastic and aluminium. As a result, waste glass from Tioman Island is not sent out to mainland for recycling. Other factors that glass is not sent out are that it is bulky, heavy and is hard to handle in terms of transportation and logistics, which means transporting it costs a lot.

 

While plastic, aluminium and electronic wastes are sent out to mainland for recycling, waste glass on Tioman Island is cleaned and then crushed with glass crushing machine on the island – a project spearheaded by Reef Check Malaysia in collaboration with Rumah Hijau. The crushed glass is then used with cement for construction projects on the island, reducing the consumption of natural resources such as sand. The crushed glass is also used with cement to build coral block – with glass bottles cemented in the coral block as attachment site for broken live corals, for coral rehabilitation programme on the island. The repurposing of waste glass into construction and reef rehabilitation materials not only minimise greenhouse emissions and reduce wastes going to incinerator but also provide substrate for broken live corals to attach on and continue to thrive.  

Share on Twitter Share on Facebook

Reef rehabilitation is the act of partially or, more rarely, fully replacing structural or functional characteristics of an ecosystem that have been diminished or lost, to a close approximation of its condition prior to disturbance. It is important to understand that this activity needs to be looked at in the context of the wider landscape, whereby the rehabilitation activity is integrated as a part of the existing ecosystem, and not creating a new one. It is important to note that there is no point rehabilitating coral reef unless the local stressors that were the original reason for the decline are addressed. Reef rehabilitation should therefore go hand in hand with rigorous management.

 

On Tioman Island, reef rehabilitation is part of an on-going conservation activities carried out by Reef Check Malaysia under its Cintai Tioman programme. The rehabilitation programme is more of an emergency response system to address physical impacts to corals such as anchor damage, storm damage and physical damage caused by divers/snorkellers. This system has responded to many incidents, saving many corals.

 

Live broken coral fragments (regardless of growth form and species) are collected from the surrounding reefs and attached to substrate made either from iron bar or cement block and recycled glass bottles. Many of these coral fragments were on the seabed and thus partially bleached (the side resting on the sand). Without attachment to a solid substrate, these corals would, over time, be abraded by natural water circulation and die.

Share on Twitter Share on Facebook

Due to Covid-19 pandemic, the Reef Check EcoDiver course were dormant in 2020 and 2021. This year, we are able to resume offering the course. The Reef Check EcoDiver course trains scuba diver volunteers on conducting Reef Check surveys. Over the last 2 months, we trained and certified over 30 divers. With the completion of the course, they are now able to participate in our Reef Check surveys (and any other Reef Check surveys within the Indo-Pacific region) to collect data needed to assess the heath of coral reefs.

 

The Reef Check EcoDiver course combines education with action to give scuba diver volunteers a unique experience while taking an active role in conserving the world’s reefs. There are more than 200 permanent survey sites to be surveyed annually in Malaysia and each survey requires a team of 5 EcoDivers. Training of volunteers and participation from these volunteers enable all permanent survey sites in Malaysia surveyed yearly and allow different stakeholders (government officers, local communities, NGOs) working together to combat the crises affecting our reefs. 

Share on Twitter Share on Facebook

The World Reef Awareness Day, World Oceans Day and Coral Triangle Day fall in the month of June. In conjunction with these three important days, Reef Check Malaysia took the opportunity to spread awareness on the importance of conserving and protecting our reefs and oceans.

 

Webinar on ‘The Diversity of Marine Ecosystems in Mersing and the Importance of Conserving Them’ was given by the Mersing team and managed to reach around 400 audiences. Reef rehabilitation and clean-up programmes were also carried out on Tioman Island, islands around Mersing and in Sabah. These activities were carried out together with volunteers and gave us the opportunities to inform our volunteers the important benefits of healthy coral reef ecosystems and what they can do in their daily life to help.

Share on Twitter Share on Facebook
 

About Project Reports

Project Reports on GlobalGiving are posted directly to globalgiving.org by Project Leaders as they are completed, generally every 3-4 months. To protect the integrity of these documents, GlobalGiving does not alter them; therefore you may find some language or formatting issues.

If you donate to this project or have donated to this project, you will get an e-mail when this project posts a report. You can also subscribe for reports via e-mail without donating.

Get Reports via Email

We'll only email you new reports and updates about this project.

Organization Information

Reef Check Malaysia

Location: Kuala Lumpur, WP - Malaysia
Website:
Facebook: Facebook Page
Twitter: @ReefCheckMY
Project Leader:
Theresa Ng
Kuala Lumpur, Wilayah Persekutuan Malaysia
$75,587 raised of $300,000 goal
 
1,425 donations
$224,413 to go
Donate Now
lock
Donating through GlobalGiving is safe, secure, and easy with many payment options to choose from. View other ways to donate

Reef Check Malaysia has earned this recognition on GlobalGiving:

Help raise money!

Support this important cause by creating a personalized fundraising page.

Start a Fundraiser

Learn more about GlobalGiving

Teenage Science Students
Vetting +
Due Diligence

Snorkeler
Our
Impact

Woman Holding a Gift Card
Give
Gift Cards

Young Girl with a Bicycle
GlobalGiving
Guarantee

Sign up for the GlobalGiving Newsletter

WARNING: Javascript is currently disabled or is not available in your browser. GlobalGiving makes extensive use of Javascript and will not function properly with Javascript disabled. Please enable Javascript and refresh this page.