Lift up cyclone-devastated families in Mozambique

by Peace Winds Japan
Lift up cyclone-devastated families in Mozambique
Lift up cyclone-devastated families in Mozambique
Lift up cyclone-devastated families in Mozambique
Lift up cyclone-devastated families in Mozambique
Lift up cyclone-devastated families in Mozambique
Lift up cyclone-devastated families in Mozambique
Lift up cyclone-devastated families in Mozambique
Lift up cyclone-devastated families in Mozambique
Lift up cyclone-devastated families in Mozambique
Lift up cyclone-devastated families in Mozambique
Lift up cyclone-devastated families in Mozambique
Lift up cyclone-devastated families in Mozambique
Lift up cyclone-devastated families in Mozambique
Lift up cyclone-devastated families in Mozambique
People walking on flooded roads to fetch water
People walking on flooded roads to fetch water

Since Cyclone Idai, which brought catastrophic damage to Mozambique in March 2019, Peace Winds Japan (PWJ) has assisted survivors who were in serious humanitarian needs. However, before we could find their full recovery from loss and turmoil, another new cyclone (Eloise) has landed on central Mozambique in January 2021. The strong wind collapsed houses, and torrential rains flooded rivers and lands in Sofala province as well as the surrounding three provinces.  As of February 4, 2021, the number of affected people was 441,686 (86,412 households), with the farmland of 219,124 hectares flooded. In Sofala province only, which was the hardest hit by this disaster again, more than 34,000 persons (8,800 households) escaped to temporary shelters.  Because of the amount of rainfall was so big, much of the land and roads are still under water or muds even now, making it very difficult to deliver relief items in many areas.  

There is a primary school, turned into a temporary shelter at in Buzi District, and its emergency soup kitchen provides meals only once a day, only for adults.  Some parents give up their meals so that they can feed their children.  PWJ knew families were in dire need for more food, so we provided with meal ingredients (corn flour, beans, oil, salt) for about 2,710 families at the temporary shelters in Buzi District.

The recovery will take a long term intervention - Mozambique government has begun setting up resettlement areas by clearing lands that were originally uninhabited bushes and fields, and promoting migration of those who were affected by the disasters. However, these resettlement areas must first begin with the construction of housing and toilets by migrants themselves. And of course, there is no other basic infrastructures such as electricity or water. Currently, people are living in simple shelters using natural materials such as straws and muds, and worn-out tarpaulins so they could avoid rain and wind. They are also digging well wells by hand for drinking water, though the water is not safe to drink but they have no other choice.

The majority of the affected people are farmers who have lost a source of income, because the crops in the fields have been devastated. In order for them to resettle in the new land, they are in need support for housing materials, well constructions, agricultural tools and seeds so that they can begin rebuilding their lives and livelihoods. And PWJ continues to help fulfill such needs, so that people affected by cyclones in Mozambique will be able to recover faster.

Thank you for your support.

A primary school as a temporary shelter
A primary school as a temporary shelter
People in a long line to receive meals
People in a long line to receive meals
Food assistance to Buzi District Government
Food assistance to Buzi District Government
Share on Twitter Share on Facebook
Children and ladies at a water supply point
Children and ladies at a water supply point

After one year and ten months since March 2019 cyclone, as many as 740,000 people in Mozambique found themselves being in need for safe water and sanitation unfortunately.

 

Peace Winds Japan (PWJ) and its partner organizations - Christian Council of Mozambique (CCM) and Youth Association for Epidemic Prevention and Combat (AJUPCE) - have responded to serious need for safe water in the nation, cooperating with other humanitarian organizations and people living in Sofala Province. As of September 2020, the newly-built and renovated water supply systems that include solar panels, electric pumps and water tanks; traditional hand pumps; and wells of various depths that were designed to reach pure water source, have been working and benefitting 2,407 families (11,855 individuals) daily.

 

While running the safe water project, PWJ oversees the established 10 water management committees, who operate and maintain all the existing hardware, promote access to safe water, and disseminate knowledge and helpful information on how to seek for better health, through 1,332 families (6,660 individuals) who have already participated in hygiene promotion activities.

 

“Yes, we will stay here, and serve more.” In January 2021, PWJ decided to send a survey and relief mission to Cabo Delgado, the northern province of Mozambique. As of December 2020, the cumulative number of internally displaced people (IDP) fleeing from the armed forces has exceeded 520,000, and severe shortage of water is reported. PWJ initially hopes to support 400 families (2,000 individuals) to relieve, fully utilizing its knowledge and experience bases in Sofala Province.

 

Thank you very much for joining us to give a helping hand to Mozambicans in such hardship and tribulation. Your continuous support empowers and strengthens them to regain joy in their life.

Community joins in the work for water pipeline
Community joins in the work for water pipeline
Trainees test a hand pump after assembling parts
Trainees test a hand pump after assembling parts
Community built a fence around water supply point
Community built a fence around water supply point
Ladies at a water supply point
Ladies at a water supply point
Share on Twitter Share on Facebook
Research visit to existing wells
Research visit to existing wells

Since the passing of the emergency relief period, survivors of Cyclone Idai were left only two choices: migrate to a bare resettlement land far away from their farming fields, without sufficient resources or infrastructure; or to return to their own damaged homes to restart their lives with almost no help.

 

Six months after the March 2019 cyclone, as many as 25% of the people in affected provinces, including Sofala, did not have access to safe water. In Sofala Province, more than 47,000 people were displaced due to the cyclone, and many of them found themselves moving to resettlement areas.

 

Peace Winds Japan (PWJ) and its partner organizations have built water supply systems that include tube wells, solar panels, electric pumps, water tanks, and tap stands at multiple locations. These water supply systems were constructed in three resettlement areas, one host community, and district hospitals in Nhamatanda and Dondo Districts, Sofala Province. One water supply system delivers more than 16,000 liters per day, which can support more than 1,000 people’s daily needs.

 

In addition to solar systems, PWJ also provided traditional hand pumps and supports affected people who decided to remain or return to their old homes. Sodium was found in the groundwater of some areas and so PWJ, in cooperation with neighborhood residents, repaired old, damaged wells and newly built wells to obtain potable water from limited groundwater sources.

 

To advance the sustainability of the wells and supply systems, PWJ helped to establish a water management committee to oversee the maintenance of facilities and promote hygiene education among beneficiaries. Thus far, representatives from 1,177 families have participated in the hygiene promotion activities, taking covid-19 preventive measures into account.

 

As of May 2020, 12% of the people in affected areas continue to rely on open wells, lagoons, waterways, and other unsafe water sources. In response, PWJ is planning a new project with a partner organization, Youth Association for Epidemic Prevention and Combat (AJUPCE), to provide safe water to 1,160 families (5,800 individuals) by May 2021.

Solar-powered water supply system
Solar-powered water supply system
Water supply point at hand-pumped well
Water supply point at hand-pumped well
Committee performing a skit on better health
Committee performing a skit on better health
Group photo after hygiene promotion session
Group photo after hygiene promotion session
Share on Twitter Share on Facebook
PWJ delivers safe water supply system
PWJ delivers safe water supply system

Over one year has passed since the tragedy in Mozambique, when Cyclone Idai swirled above the Mozambique Channel bringing death and destruction to the nation. A Mozambican staff of Peace Winds Japan (PWJ) looks back on his experience, when he found himself on his bed floating on flood water at 3AM with his family shouting for him to wake up. 

 

“I escaped to a roof with my family and neighbors, but saw a man and a child clinging onto a tree across the flooded street. I swam over to the tree and first grabbed the child, and helped the panicking man with a rope. There was another man pleading with me to save his child so I went across the fast stream which was quickly rising to my chest. I managed to bring the child from the flooded area to the highway bund, and the father was also able to follow me to safety.”

 

However, when they later tried to evacuate 50 small children by boat, some desperate women forcefully climbed on board. As a result, the boat overturned and all the children who went overboard lost their precious lives. The PWJ Mozambican staff said that he can never forget what he had witnessed. 

 

Now the challenge for PWJ is to deliver safe, adequate water to the living survivors of the disaster. Together with funding from GlobalGiving and Japan Platform, PWJ has been operating a Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) assistance project in Nhamatanda and its surrounding districts in Sofala Province. Thus far, the project has provided safe water to 1,367 families (6,835 individuals).

One week after the cyclone
One week after the cyclone
One month after the cyclone
One month after the cyclone
Child getting water two months after the cyclone
Child getting water two months after the cyclone
Share on Twitter Share on Facebook
Ndenja resettler
Ndenja resettler

Peace Winds Japan (PWJ) has been supporting people affected by Cyclone Idai in Mozambique since April 2019. An estimated 400,000 were displaced from their homes immediately after the disaster.

PWJ’s emergency response team visited and interviewed families, community leaders and local governments in Sofala and Manica Provinces that were hardest hit by strong winds and floods. Based on the results of these visits, food (rice/corn flour), non-food items (mosquito nets and laundry soap), and materials for housing (nails, hammers, hatchets, etc.) were distributed. The survivors were able to eat daily and rebuild their homes, with neighbors supporting one another.

From May to August 2019, PWJ moved from distributing emergency relief items to seeds and farming equipment (seeds of maize, beans and vegetables; watering cans, hoes, and knives) to more families, so that beneficiaries could restart farming and expect the earliest possible harvest. Staff from PWJ’s partner NGO, Christian Council of Mozambique, trained the beneficiaries on how to prepare good soil and prevent worms from harming the crops. The staff also visited their fields to ensure that the farmers had gained sufficient knowledge and skills.

Together with funding from GlobalGiving and Japan Platform, PWJ was able to reach a total of 3,386 families with the aforementioned items and technical support for farming in Nhamatanda District, Sofala Province.

Thank you to our supporters for helping us implement this project. We look to your generous support to continue our assistance activities in Mozambique.

Farming training session
Farming training session
Using shelter tool kit
Using shelter tool kit
Ndenja resettlers
Ndenja resettlers
Share on Twitter Share on Facebook
 

About Project Reports

Project Reports on GlobalGiving are posted directly to globalgiving.org by Project Leaders as they are completed, generally every 3-4 months. To protect the integrity of these documents, GlobalGiving does not alter them; therefore you may find some language or formatting issues.

If you donate to this project or have donated to this project, you will get an e-mail when this project posts a report. You can also subscribe for reports via e-mail without donating.

Get Reports via Email

We'll only email you new reports and updates about this project.

Organization Information

Peace Winds Japan

Location: Jinsekikogen-cho, Hiroshima Prefecture - Japan
Website:
Project Leader:
Rika Yamamoto
Jinsekikogen-cho, Hiroshima Prefecture Japan
$3,184 raised of $10,000 goal
 
11 donations
$6,816 to go
Donate Now
lock
Donating through GlobalGiving is safe, secure, and easy with many payment options to choose from. View other ways to donate

Peace Winds Japan has earned this recognition on GlobalGiving:
Add Project to Favorites

Help raise money!

Support this important cause by creating a personalized fundraising page.

Start a Fundraiser

Learn more about GlobalGiving

Teenage Science Students
Vetting +
Due Diligence

Snorkeler
Our
Impact

Woman Holding a Gift Card
Give
Gift Cards

Young Girl with a Bicycle
GlobalGiving
Guarantee

Sign up for the GlobalGiving Newsletter

WARNING: Javascript is currently disabled or is not available in your browser. GlobalGiving makes extensive use of Javascript and will not function properly with Javascript disabled. Please enable Javascript and refresh this page.