Protecting Chimpanzees

by David Shepherd Wildlife Foundation
Protecting Chimpanzees
Protecting Chimpanzees
Protecting Chimpanzees
Protecting Chimpanzees
Protecting Chimpanzees
Protecting Chimpanzees
Protecting Chimpanzees
Protecting Chimpanzees
Protecting Chimpanzees
Protecting Chimpanzees
Protecting Chimpanzees
Protecting Chimpanzees
Protecting Chimpanzees
Protecting Chimpanzees

Project Report | Aug 9, 2019
Protecting Chimpanzees - August update 2019

By Theo Bromfield | Project Leader

Thank you for donating to our Protecting Chimpanzees project. We would like to share a very special story with you about the remarkable group of people that you are helping to fund, carrying out extraordinary work fighting to end wildlife crime.

The Chimpanzee Conservation Centre in Guinea (CCC) provides vital rescue, rehabilitation and release programmes for illegally trafficked chimps. They also lead educational initiatives attempting to reduce the local demand and raise awareness about the serious consequences of the illegal wildlife trade.

Chimpanzees populations have been declining rapidly in the last ten years, with one chimpanzee every four hours being killed for bushmeat or taken and sold as pets on the black market. For every baby chimpanzee stolen, an average of ten chimpanzees from their troupe are killed trying to protect them.

David Shepherd Wildlife Foundation was asked to help support CCC as a conservation partner in 2017 after a dramatic rise in chimpanzees received into the centre; since 2015, the number of animals in care has increased by a tragic 40%. The last 12 months have seen crucial developments, however, and CCC have been able to launch a new education programme thanks to support from DSWF, provided by supporters like you.

We asked CCC Executive Director Christelle Colin to put into words the importance of the new project:

“We were able to hire a specialised consultant to develop a new conservation education program, a volunteer and a junior educator. We aim to reach schools and adults in Faranah and Haut Niger National Park. Thanks to this support, our impact on conservation of chimpanzees in our area will dramatically increase.

“We are currently developing other ways to directly fight the root causes of chimpanzee decline across Guinea, including our education program, community projects focused on reducing negative human impact on natural resources and chimpanzee habitat, empowerment of women, and increasing our support to the Haut Niger National Park authorities for the protection of the Park and its wildlife."   

The small team at CCC have already reached 455 students, 150 police and armed forces personnel and 450 people from villages near to the national park. Their incredible efforts and commitment are making an astounding difference to the plight and future of chimpanzees in Guinea.

Our Head of Programmes and Policy, Georgina Lamb, explains DSWF’s involvement with the project and the importance of protecting primates:

“DSWF was introduced to CCC by a fellow conservation organisation who wanted to raise awareness for chimpanzees and the work being done in the remote, under-supported area in Guinea. DSWF has supported primate work in the past on a smaller scale and due to the shocking increase in illegal trade in chimpanzees, we decided it was important to support this initiative in West Africa.

“We initially committed funding for a year to see how the relationship would develop and were impressed with the dedication of the team and the results there were achieving so decided to induct the project into our ongoing portfolio."

Funding from DSWF directly supports CCC’s emergency rescue missions and education programme. We hope you have enjoyed learning a little more about this remarkable project.

Thank you for donating to our Protecting Chimpanzees project. We would like to share a very special story with you about the remarkable group of people that you are helping to fund, carrying out extraordinary work fighting to end wildlife crime.

The Chimpanzee Conservation Centre in Guinea (CCC) provides vital rescue, rehabilitation and release programmes for illegally trafficked chimps. They also lead educational initiatives attempting to reduce the local demand and raise awareness about the serious consequences of the illegal wildlife trade.

Chimpanzees populations have been declining rapidly in the last ten years, with one chimpanzee every four hours being killed for bushmeat or taken and sold as pets on the black market. For every baby chimpanzee stolen, an average of ten chimpanzees from their troupe are killed trying to protect them.

David Shepherd Wildlife Foundation was asked to help support CCC as a conservation partner in 2017 after a dramatic rise in chimpanzees received into the centre; since 2015, the number of animals in care has increased by a tragic 40%. The last 12 months have seen crucial developments, however, and CCC have been able to launch a new education programme thanks to support from DSWF, provided by supporters like you.

We asked CCC Executive Director Christelle Colin to put into words the importance of the new project:

“We were able to hire a specialised consultant to develop a new conservation education program, a volunteer and a junior educator. We aim to reach schools and adults in Faranah and Haut Niger National Park. Thanks to this support, our impact on conservation of chimpanzees in our area will dramatically increase.

“We are currently developing other ways to directly fight the root causes of chimpanzee decline across Guinea, including our education program, community projects focused on reducing negative human impact on natural resources and chimpanzee habitat, empowerment of women, and increasing our support to the Haut Niger National Park authorities for the protection of the Park and its wildlife."   

The small team at CCC have already reached 455 students, 150 police and armed forces personnel and 450 people from villages near to the national park. Their incredible efforts and commitment are making an astounding difference to the plight and future of chimpanzees in Guinea.

Our Head of Programmes and Policy, Georgina Lamb, explains DSWF’s involvement with the project and the importance of protecting primates:

“DSWF was introduced to CCC by a fellow conservation organisation who wanted to raise awareness for chimpanzees and the work being done in the remote, under-supported area in Guinea. DSWF has supported primate work in the past on a smaller scale and due to the shocking increase in illegal trade in chimpanzees, we decided it was important to support this initiative in West Africa.

“We initially committed funding for a year to see how the relationship would develop and were impressed with the dedication of the team and the results there were achieving so decided to induct the project into our ongoing portfolio."

Funding from DSWF directly supports CCC’s emergency rescue missions and education programme. We hope you have enjoyed learning a little more about this remarkable project.

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Organization Information

David Shepherd Wildlife Foundation

Location: Guildford, Surrey - United Kingdom
Website:
Facebook: Facebook Page
Twitter: @DSWFwildlife
Project Leader:
Lawrence Avery
Guildford , Surrey United Kingdom

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