Save the Amazon: Protect Jaguars and Wildlife

by Action Change (Formerly GVI Trust)
Save the Amazon: Protect Jaguars and Wildlife
Save the Amazon: Protect Jaguars and Wildlife
Save the Amazon: Protect Jaguars and Wildlife
Save the Amazon: Protect Jaguars and Wildlife
Save the Amazon: Protect Jaguars and Wildlife
Save the Amazon: Protect Jaguars and Wildlife
Save the Amazon: Protect Jaguars and Wildlife
Save the Amazon: Protect Jaguars and Wildlife
Save the Amazon: Protect Jaguars and Wildlife
Save the Amazon: Protect Jaguars and Wildlife
Save the Amazon: Protect Jaguars and Wildlife
Save the Amazon: Protect Jaguars and Wildlife
Save the Amazon: Protect Jaguars and Wildlife
Save the Amazon: Protect Jaguars and Wildlife
Save the Amazon: Protect Jaguars and Wildlife
Save the Amazon: Protect Jaguars and Wildlife
Save the Amazon: Protect Jaguars and Wildlife
Save the Amazon: Protect Jaguars and Wildlife
Save the Amazon: Protect Jaguars and Wildlife
Save the Amazon: Protect Jaguars and Wildlife

Project Report | Feb 21, 2019
Protecting Wetland, Forest and Nesting Habitats

By Eunice Jimenez | Program Manager

Dears Supporters,

This quarter has seen the base at Jalova continue to monitor these important habitats for the protection of the planet’s biodiversity. The projects here worked to conserve Aquatic bird species in a world designated RAMSAR site, whilst our more terrestrial efforts saw the team monitoring lowland humid rainforests. The last quarter also saw the close of our turtle season with over 3,000 nests recorded in the world’s second largest rookery for Green Turtles.

GVI Jalova has been working tirelessly to ensure the continued success of the flora and fauna of Tortuguero National Park. Whatever the weather our dedicated volunteers and staff will be heading out onto the trails and canals of the park, as well as patrolling the beach, protecting the beautiful haven for nesting sea turtles.

The main aim of our Canal Bird Project is to monitor the populations found using the freshwater canal system and surrounding swamp forest area in the National Park. This site is designated as a RAMSAR protected area due to its importance as a wetland area. It is also as the entrance for many migratory bird species to Costa Rica. In the last three months, we have seen an explosion in migratory birds as the main migratory season started. We have recorded 33 migrant species, six passage migrants and one casual migrant which use this valuable habitat to over winter or to stop off at during their long journey southwards.

GVI Jalova has been working tirelessly to ensure the continued success of the flora and fauna of Tortuguero National Park. Whatever the weather our dedicated volunteers and staff will be heading out onto the trails and canals of the park, as well as patrolling the beach, protecting the beautiful haven for nesting sea turtles.

The main aim of our Canal Bird Project is to monitor the populations found using the freshwater canal system and surrounding swamp forest area in the National Park. This site is designated as a RAMSAR protected area due to its importance as a wetland area. It is also as the entrance for many migratory bird species to Costa Rica. In the last three months, we have seen an explosion in migratory birds as the main migratory season started. We have recorded 33 migrant species, six passage migrants and one casual migrant which use this valuable habitat to over winter or to stop off at during their long journey southwards. 

In the forests of the National Park, our volunteers got to walk in the presence of six vulnerable or endangered species. We are fortunate that one of the rarest primate species in the world reside on our door stop and are seen frequently by all. As part of our monitoring project, we conduct monthly censuses of the population of the Central American Spider Monkey (Ateles geoffroyi) on behalf of AcTO (Ministry for the Environment and Energy, one of our many partner organisations). During one such census 61 individuals were encountered ranging from small family groups of females with their young to groups of males out foraging for fruit in the canopy. These are encouraging results for a species that are critically endangered and the evidence of breeding family groups indicates that the population is doing well and thriving in this protected area. Such a privilege for us all to see them so closely.

It isn’t just rare monkeys that we see here and help to monitor, there are five other species too that require our help to conserve. Three bird species are of concern in the area including the Endangered Great Green Macaw (Ara ambiguous) and the Great Curassow (Crax rubra). These species were encountered eleven times over the last three months and these sightings not only inspire the volunteers who work hard to help us run these monitoring projects but also give us conservationists hope for the future and the knowledge that together we can achieve incredible things when it comes to protecting the world’s biodiversity.

Finally, our greatest achievement of the last three months really must have been the tireless work done with our nesting and hatching green turtles. We finished the turtle season with over 3,000 nests and spent November and December monitoring the nests looking for signs that the babies were ready to emerge and make the difficult journey to the ocean and into life beyond. As with all our experiences here we were all so privileged to have been a part of helping this endangered species survive into the next generation. A special moment was the last nest of last year which we thought had not survived an unseasonably wet and cold end to the year. When we went to investigate it, 117 green turtle hatchlings exploded out and crawled quickly to the sea, much to the relief of all us here witnessing this remarkable spectacle.

It is with great excitement that we look forward to the next three months where we plan to strengthen our bonds within the local community, address the plastic pollution washing up on the beach with regular beach cleans and continue to marvel at and monitor the wildlife that it is our responsibility to look after.

With Grattude, 

GVI Jalova

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Nov 21, 2018
Environmental Education and Strengthening our Bond

By Cormac Healy | Program Manager

Aug 7, 2018
Beach Cleans and Public Awareness

By Mac | Program Manager

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Organization Information

Action Change (Formerly GVI Trust)

Location: London - United Kingdom
Website:
Facebook: Facebook Page
Project Leader:
Tyrone Bennett
London , London United Kingdom
$36,372 raised of $46,500 goal
 
733 donations
$10,128 to go
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