Productive, Healing Center for Women in Mexico

by MANOS QUE RECONSTRUYEN OAXACA A.C.
Play Video
Productive, Healing Center for Women in Mexico
Productive, Healing Center for Women in Mexico
Productive, Healing Center for Women in Mexico
Productive, Healing Center for Women in Mexico
Productive, Healing Center for Women in Mexico
Productive, Healing Center for Women in Mexico
Productive, Healing Center for Women in Mexico
Productive, Healing Center for Women in Mexico
Productive, Healing Center for Women in Mexico
Productive, Healing Center for Women in Mexico
Productive, Healing Center for Women in Mexico
Productive, Healing Center for Women in Mexico
Productive, Healing Center for Women in Mexico
Productive, Healing Center for Women in Mexico
Productive, Healing Center for Women in Mexico
Productive, Healing Center for Women in Mexico
Productive, Healing Center for Women in Mexico
Productive, Healing Center for Women in Mexico
Productive, Healing Center for Women in Mexico
Productive, Healing Center for Women in Mexico
Productive, Healing Center for Women in Mexico
Productive, Healing Center for Women in Mexico
Productive, Healing Center for Women in Mexico
Productive, Healing Center for Women in Mexico
Productive, Healing Center for Women in Mexico
Productive, Healing Center for Women in Mexico
Productive, Healing Center for Women in Mexico
Productive, Healing Center for Women in Mexico
Productive, Healing Center for Women in Mexico
Productive, Healing Center for Women in Mexico
Productive, Healing Center for Women in Mexico
Productive, Healing Center for Women in Mexico
Productive, Healing Center for Women in Mexico
Productive, Healing Center for Women in Mexico
Productive, Healing Center for Women in Mexico
Productive, Healing Center for Women in Mexico
Productive, Healing Center for Women in Mexico
Productive, Healing Center for Women in Mexico
Productive, Healing Center for Women in Mexico
Productive, Healing Center for Women in Mexico
Productive, Healing Center for Women in Mexico
Productive, Healing Center for Women in Mexico
Productive, Healing Center for Women in Mexico
Productive, Healing Center for Women in Mexico
Productive, Healing Center for Women in Mexico
Productive, Healing Center for Women in Mexico
Productive, Healing Center for Women in Mexico
Productive, Healing Center for Women in Mexico
Productive, Healing Center for Women in Mexico
Productive, Healing Center for Women in Mexico
Productive, Healing Center for Women in Mexico
Productive, Healing Center for Women in Mexico
Productive, Healing Center for Women in Mexico
Productive, Healing Center for Women in Mexico
Productive, Healing Center for Women in Mexico
Productive, Healing Center for Women in Mexico
Productive, Healing Center for Women in Mexico
Productive, Healing Center for Women in Mexico
Productive, Healing Center for Women in Mexico
Productive, Healing Center for Women in Mexico
Productive, Healing Center for Women in Mexico
Productive, Healing Center for Women in Mexico
Productive, Healing Center for Women in Mexico
Productive, Healing Center for Women in Mexico
Productive, Healing Center for Women in Mexico
Productive, Healing Center for Women in Mexico
Productive, Healing Center for Women in Mexico
Productive, Healing Center for Women in Mexico
Productive, Healing Center for Women in Mexico
Productive, Healing Center for Women in Mexico
Productive, Healing Center for Women in Mexico
Joanna and Perse pulping mango
Joanna and Perse pulping mango

"My name is Iris, I am part of the women promoters of “My fruit, my town” project with which we dream of getting alimentary sovereignty for everyone by avoiding waste of regional fruits. In April I started working with Joanna and Mary, who are community liaison coordinators in Chihuitán and San Dionisio del Mar, respectively. These villages have an excess of fruit trees, and in each frutal season, almost 1500 pounds of fruit per family are wasted. During this season Chihuitán was rich in mango and plum while San Dionisio had tamarind and nanche.  

We are a total of 26 women organizing between both communities working to transform fruit into dehydrated products, marmalade, ferments, vinegars and even bocashi (accelerated compost). During this season we saved around 150 pounds of fruit per organized session. 

Because of the rains and damaged roads sometimes I can’t reach the communities, and with pandemic measures communication it's complicated, but we have found good ways to organize ourselves through local promoters.  For me Joanna and Mary are the motivational link, being a local promoter means being the young mind who is not afraid to experiment new things. If women want to try a new process or a new fruit, Joanna always said “Well then, who knows what it will come out but for sure it will be delicious”.

Every time we meet, we share different techniques for transforming fruits and methods for speeding up the processes. Last time in San Dionisio del Mar, we were trying to remove raw tamarind seeds with knives, which is a hard task, when one of the older women suggested cooking them before cutting to smooth the peel. Besides our hands were very grateful, we reduced cleaning time in half. Sometimes the most obvious is not obvious at all!

Many of the women that are part of the collectives are traditional cookers, tortilleras, bakers and other traditional trades in which they are exposed to ovens and heat. What I can see, is that most of them are very interested in changing that economical activity to fruit production in the collective because they can share time with other women and also because it is more profitable in terms of time and money.  One of them told me “Imagine, if I am going to fry empanadas it will take me 20 hours, and after that I can’t go out or eat something cold because I can get sick, that’s why I liked to make peanut marzipan, we don’t need firewood to make them” 

As promoters we are very excited about creating collectives, we want to save mangos, avoid fruit waste but most of all we want more women participating. We must seek to motivate more villagers to work with fruit and vegetable waste because for us, this represents community progress. We want to embrace productive activities that don't damage the earth and promote preservation and regeneration of soils." 

Thanks a lot for being part of UMPO productive programms, we dream with the biggest red of organized local promotores for avoiding fruit waste. 

Iris making tamarind sauce
Iris making tamarind sauce
collecting mango
collecting mango
nopal cutting
nopal cutting
Ana with jam
Ana with jam
Share on Twitter Share on Facebook
Montserrat a young handicraft entrepreneur
Montserrat a young handicraft entrepreneur

“My name is Montserrat, I am 16 years old and I want to be a traditional Istmeño embroidery guardian. I decided to practice this handicraft because I want the others to know my culture and traditions, that when they meet me, they value me as a designer but also to embrace my embroidery, my traditional clothes, my entire zapotec culture. In the future I want to share this knowledge to people from inside my community and outside it. I like to participate in the embroidery workshop because it is a relaxing therapy, it is cero stress. Everyday I am learning new tricks and creating creative concepts. I want to have my own traditional clothing brand, with customized embroidery designs, in which people identify their own feelings in the pieces they select.”

In Una mano para Oaxaca  we are working with our educational post disaster model intervention, with which we share ancestral knowledge as traditional handicrafts to the women of our communities so they can start new business. We like to self-appoint as traditional crafts guardians.  Since we started this project, in 2017 we are focused on promoting social networks between women to launch new productive activities that embrace our zapotec culture, we are improving on how to provide emotional health and developing more ways for learning handicrafts. We notice that there was a fortuite interest of the younger generations for learning about traditions too so we decided to evolve our pedagogic model to a creative and dynamic one. 

“My name is Sinai, I am 31 years old and I love to use traditional clothes. I decided to start a local business with my sister in which we want to use traditional embroidery in t-shirts we believe is a good way to innovate and that new generations will like them.”

 For the next three months new groups will be learning embroidery, carpentry and handmade woven bags.  Monste and Sinai represent hope and change, they show the resilience of zapotec people in adapting to crisis, no matter the nature of it, our traditions are safeguardings of our emotional health and a possibility of economical reactivation. 

Once again thank you so much for your solidarity and valuable support.

Regards, 

UMPO team 

First carpentry practice
First carpentry practice
Esmeralda, handmade purses teacher
Esmeralda, handmade purses teacher
Share on Twitter Share on Facebook
Chela, local potter artisan and teacher
Chela, local potter artisan and teacher

Hi there! We are very glad to tell you that this new year we are full of ideas for changing our world. Thank you again for being part of 2020, it was a very unpredictable year, but we feel that our people are more united than ever.  

As we told you in other reports, we are trying a mixed digital and semipresencial educational model for our communities. We are trying to involve our participants in learning cycles for collective healing, especially because now the living environment has been more violent and difficult for all of us. 

Simultaneously we continue with the ancestral knowledge workshops such as pottery, textiles, food conserves, and family backyard gardens for self-consumption. 

Today I want to share our pottery workshop experience which was full of revelations of the pandemic effects. The workshop was a real challenge, first of all, many of the participants didn’t have any kind of access to digital sources nor knowledge for using them. Secondly, the class was driven by Laura, a ceramist from Torreón (Mexico’s north) and Chela, a pottery artisan from our community in Oaxaca; this difference of contexts slowed the group integration. But finally the participants were from 4 different zapotec communities, which enhanced and diversified the cultural perspectives of each one. The objective of the workshop was to open creative possibilities for creating new products based on the traditional pottery knowledge but adapted to their actual needs. The results were awesome! They made clay jewelry, sculptures and cooking utensils and most of them are now producing and selling. 

Origalia an indigenous Zapotec, 66 year old, woman, shared with us the next message of encouragement: “I have been a sculptor since ever, but I decided to participate in the pottery workshop because it was a complete challenge. The digital part was so difficult, my husband told me I was lucky to take that computational workshop 20 years ago (laughs), and even with that I needed UMPO’s team help even for turning on the class . I mean I want to learn more about everything and you want to protect my health, then I must learn how to use this things (tablets and zoom). The most powerful result for me is that I am truly motivated to do new activities. Some months ago I participated in the gardens for self-consumption workshops, and now I am eating tomatoes from my garden and I am preparing a sculpture exposition. I feel alive.” 

This 2021 we will continue revalorizing the traditional arts and crafts,giving entrepreneurs, such as Origalia and the pottery workshop group, opportunities to boost their growth. Together we are generating community, which we believe is the key for maintaining our communities. Thank you for being part. ¡Feliz año nuevo!

Origalia
Origalia
Clay pot
Clay pot
Workshop participants
Workshop participants
orange juice clay extractor
orange juice clay extractor
Share on Twitter Share on Facebook
Perseida in the communitary garden
Perseida in the communitary garden

Hi there! It has been a while since the last update. In Una mano para Oaxaca (UMPO) we have noticed that “uncertainty” is the general diagnosis of Planet Earth, but here we are sharing with you beautiful news that have returned happiness to our hearts. 

After COVID-19 started and the lockdown turned to be normal, we were very worried about finding a way to continue our workshops. As you know, the communities in which we work are still being rebuilt, the psychological effects of the earthquake are still deep. So this halt in our lives, because of the economic recession and the threats that isolation poses to a indigenous community, comes with a lot of challenges. 

We adapted our workshops to the needs of our people. We are focusing our efforts in the traditional knowledges that allow us to have food sovereignty and strengthen our immune system. All what we teach can be applied from our houses, we use the flora of our territory and the local products to create medicine and our own food. 

These last months we learned about family backyard gardens for self-consumption, avoiding fruit waste with conservation and fermentation processes, natural pharmacy at home, femenine health and herbalism for women. The results have been awesome, we have adapted workshops to an audience even larger and more engaged than the one we worked before the cuarenteen. 

The key for this to work, is that we are using a semipresencial way of teaching for people who don't have the possibility to access digital media,  and also, that participants who have access to digital media and internet are sharing it with others who don't, by their own initiative. 

We are very proud to share this achievement with you, because the actual vulnerability of communities is providing a positive side for making  stronger ties between women, creating new work-from-home cooperatives and reducing hunger in the zapotec region. 

Today, 92 new women have joined the UMPO family, and we dream together to build more opportunities for everyone. 

Thank YOU for making this possible.

 

PS. Thanks to all the support that we have received from you UMPO won the Rural Youth Innovation Awart in Latin America and the Caribbean (link below)

Digital herbal medicine workshops
Digital herbal medicine workshops
Avoiding frutal waste cooperative
Avoiding frutal waste cooperative
Participants results
Participants results
Lili, pineapple marmalade
Lili, pineapple marmalade

Links:

Share on Twitter Share on Facebook
Aida driving a Mototaxi with the Solidary Speaker
Aida driving a Mototaxi with the Solidary Speaker

Hi there, we are very happy to share what is going on with our community during these days. Although the international situation has been very difficult because of COVID-19, we are trying our best not to suspend every activity. We had to stop most of them, like many others have had, and we are trying to adapt our interventions in the community to the actual needs respecting security measures for personal safety.

That’s why we started the project “Solidary speaker”. We adapted a speaker to the UMPOmovil, and we drive across the community sharing messages of joy, poems, songs, stories and health recommendations, both in spanish and in zapoteco (our native language). All of the shared audios, are sent in by friends from within and without the region. ¡You can send yours too! The objective is to provide courage to people from our community through the confinement, and to strengthen our bonds in spite of the lengthy lockdown and the lack of visits. We believe positive emotions such as humor, love and hope boost our immune system.

You can listen to some of the audios we have shared in the links below.

We are also joyous to tell you that before the confinement started, two of our favorite workshops met their goal. Two groups of women learned a new craft, which could empower them as a new mean of productivity.

The first one was hand making of colorful plastic woven bags and purses. “This technique helps us reduce pollution in our town, since common plastic bags can be substituted by these. I mean, it impacts on the environment and of course on my family finances. I was still taking the workshop when people started buying my designs”, said Karina, one of the most entrepreneurial students.

The second craft was woodwork for women, where we have learned how to make our own wood products without making big investments on tools or machines.

This kind of workshops are intended to help people with low economic resources. They might represent an opportunity to improve their quality of life by introducing them to new means of productivity such as those described.

We will have more good news to share soon. We are planning to continue our learning programs with the help of technology available to everyone. Wherever you are reading this message, we can share this with you: the earthquake taught us that adversity is the fuel of great projects, and resilience our best weapon. Thank you for making UMPO dreams come true.

Solidary Speaker
Solidary Speaker
Artisan Karina with her woven bag design
Artisan Karina with her woven bag design
Woodwork for women
Woodwork for women

Links:

Share on Twitter Share on Facebook
 

About Project Reports

Project Reports on GlobalGiving are posted directly to globalgiving.org by Project Leaders as they are completed, generally every 3-4 months. To protect the integrity of these documents, GlobalGiving does not alter them; therefore you may find some language or formatting issues.

If you donate to this project or have donated to this project, you will get an e-mail when this project posts a report. You can also subscribe for reports via e-mail without donating.

Get Reports via Email

We'll only email you new reports and updates about this project.

Organization Information

MANOS QUE RECONSTRUYEN OAXACA A.C.

Location: Asunción Ixtaltepec, Oaxaca - Mexico
Website:
Facebook: Facebook Page
Project Leader:
Alejandra Rosado
ASUNCION IXTALTEPEC, Oaxaca Mexico
$19,010 raised of $25,000 goal
 
332 donations
$5,990 to go
Donate Now
lock
Donating through GlobalGiving is safe, secure, and easy with many payment options to choose from. View other ways to donate

MANOS QUE RECONSTRUYEN OAXACA A.C. has earned this recognition on GlobalGiving:

Help raise money!

Support this important cause by creating a personalized fundraising page.

Start a Fundraiser

Learn more about GlobalGiving

Teenage Science Students
Vetting +
Due Diligence

Snorkeler
Our
Impact

Woman Holding a Gift Card
Give
Gift Cards

Young Girl with a Bicycle
GlobalGiving
Guarantee

Sign up for the GlobalGiving Newsletter

WARNING: Javascript is currently disabled or is not available in your browser. GlobalGiving makes extensive use of Javascript and will not function properly with Javascript disabled. Please enable Javascript and refresh this page.