Nepal Earthquake Relief and Recovery

by International Disaster Volunteers (IDV)
Nepal Earthquake Relief and Recovery
Nepal Earthquake Relief and Recovery
Nepal Earthquake Relief and Recovery
Nepal Earthquake Relief and Recovery
Nepal Earthquake Relief and Recovery
Nepal Earthquake Relief and Recovery
Nepal Earthquake Relief and Recovery
Nepal Earthquake Relief and Recovery
Nepal Earthquake Relief and Recovery
Nepal Earthquake Relief and Recovery
Nepal Earthquake Relief and Recovery
Nepal Earthquake Relief and Recovery
Nepal Earthquake Relief and Recovery
Nepal Earthquake Relief and Recovery
Nepal Earthquake Relief and Recovery
Nepal Earthquake Relief and Recovery
Nepal Earthquake Relief and Recovery
Nepal Earthquake Relief and Recovery
You've helped over 2,000 kids like these
You've helped over 2,000 kids like these

As December arrives, and the new year approaches, it’s amazing to reflect on what your incredible generosity has allowed us in achieve since we first arrived in Nepal.

Our team landed on May 5, just ten days after the first earthquake. Scenes of devastation were everywhere, but with your amazing support we were able to rise to the challenge. And, over the last seven months we’ve already helped over 5,600 earthquake survivors.

We’ve provided relief in six of the fourteen affected districts and this has included 6.4 tonnes of food aid. We’ve also provided shelter and household items for almost 300 families and water for more than 1,100 people.

We’ve also supported the education of almost 2,100 kids by helping them get back to school and learning again. With your support we’ve provided classroom space to around 700 of these kids and school supplies for 1,400 more.

We think this is amazing and we’re incredibly grateful for everything you’ve enabled us to achieve in Nepal so far. Thank you so much!

But the last few months have brought frustrations too.

For example in our last report we announced our plans to construct three permanent classrooms at the Bhadrakali school in Sindhupalchok. After months of monsoon rain we were keen to get started as soon as possible.

But, just as the weather changed for the better, Nepal was struck by a fuel crisis. This has made gasoline very hard to come by and material and transport costs have rocketed as a result.

After the earthquakes this is the last thing the people of Nepal need right now. It means reconstruction plans across the country, including ours in Sindhupalchok, have all been put on hold. This is frustrating, especially for all the kids and staff at Bhadrakali school.

But rather than let frustration get the better of us, we’re making all the progress we can. Until we can continue our work in Sindhupalchok we’ve turned our attention to Bhaktapur. Its closer location to Kathmandu mean the fuel and transport challenges are much easier to deal with in the short term.

In Bhaktapur we’ve recently started work at the Adarsha school where we’re now repairing four permanent classrooms.

Our previous classrooms were all transitional and we’re delighted to now be working on permanent buildings despite the fuel situation.

We'll be working on many more classrooms in the future, both in Bhaktapur and Sindhupalchok, so we’ve recently just launched a new project on GlobalGiving to Give the Gift of Education to kids in Nepal.

Moving forward, we’ll be posting our future education based reports through that project. You can learn more about our work at the Adarsha school by reading the first of those reports here.

If you’d like to receive these new education project reports automatically then please consider making a donation to that project also. Of course, if you’d like to continue supporting our general non-education based work, then we’d also gladly welcome further donations to this project as well.

If you ever have any questions, please don’t hesitate to email Andy@IDVolunteers.org. I would be delighted to hear from you.

You've provided water to over 1,100 people
You've provided water to over 1,100 people
Sadly people are now waiting hours for fuel
Sadly people are now waiting hours for fuel
But we're still repairing classrooms like this one
But we're still repairing classrooms like this one
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Jumping for joy for an education
Jumping for joy for an education

After several months of storms the monsoon season in Nepal is finally drawing to a close. It’s a big relief for earthquake survivors as the heavy rains, which fell on a daily basis, brought even more suffering to those living in tents and other temporary shelters.

The bad weather has also created challenges for our team on the ground who have soldiered on despite the rains. These rains have led to landslides and on several occasions the roads to project sites have been blocked by debris. In these cases we’ve had to wait until machinery arrived to clear the roads before we could continue the journey to work. But continue we have.

Although we’re working in a number of different areas a big focus for us recently has been on supporting education in the district of Sindhupalchok.

The district lost over 4,000 classrooms in the earthquakes and so there’s a massive need to help get children back in school. And this is just what we’ve been doing!

For example, we’ve recently completed work on a new Temporary Learning Centre (TLC) at the Shree Bimsen School in the village of Khatrithok. We originally started supporting the school in mid June when we provided and set up a large military style tent for use as a TLC.

This provided classroom space for around 75 children, but with 275 kids enrolled at the school they still needed more. So, in recent weeks we’ve returned to the school to provide a TLC for another 80 children.

Like the original tent this new TLC was again bamboo framed, but we wanted to make the new structure much more substantial overall. So, on this occasion, we also provided a metal roof and woven bamboo matting for the walls. While this new classroom is still essentially temporary it will be durable enough to last until permanent solutions can be found.

And of course, we’re also pursuing permanent solutions as well. The recent monsoon rains have made permanent building impossible but with the season now virtually over we’re looking forward to being able to start longer-term reconstruction.

Our most immediate plans in this regard are to work with the Bhadrakali secondary school, which is also in Sindhupalchok. This school is attended by over 600 kids and, with two of its three buildings destroyed in the earthquakes, it’s in desperate need of support.

So, we’re making plans to construct three permanent classrooms for the kids. It’s going to be a big project so as always we want to send you our heartfelt thanks for your fantastic generosity. It’s only because of your generosity that our ongoing, vital work in Nepal is possible. Thanks so much!

If you ever have any questions about how we’re using your donation, please don’t hesitate to email Andy@IDVolunteers.org. I would be delighted to hear from you.

A road reopens after a landslide
A road reopens after a landslide
Our latest TLC (Temporary Learning Centre)
Our latest TLC (Temporary Learning Centre)
Kids inside our latest TLC, next job furniture!
Kids inside our latest TLC, next job furniture!
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There's beauty in Nepal despite the rain
There's beauty in Nepal despite the rain

Monsoon season has arrived in Nepal and this has brought heavy rains on a daily basis. For survivors of the earthquakes these rains bring more problems and worry.

Heavy rains can lead to landslides and flash floods, which are new disasters in themselves. Even where communities are spared from these new disasters the severe weather still compounds the problems caused by the original earthquakes.

For example the earthquakes left 1.4 million people in need of food assistance. This is a particular problem in remote mountain areas where almost 70% of people struggle to eat enough to stay healthy.

This problem is made worse by the monsoon as rains cause road closures, and this makes travel to and from communities even harder than normal. So, when we recently provided food aid to 43 families in Pyrae, Sindhupalchok district, we couldn’t simply drive to the village. Instead the families had to make the long walk down the mountain and then carry all 2,500kg of aid back up!

This is incredibly tiring for those already low on energy from hunger, but the people here are born survivors and are determined to help us help themselves.

The heavy rain also brings the need for shelter into sharp focus. The earthquakes destroyed almost 600,000 homes and hundreds of thousands of families still lack weather-proof shelter.

In response we’ve continued to provide Shelter Kits, containing roofing tin and fixings, to help survivors put a sturdy roof over their own heads as quickly as possible. While many more people still need help we’re very thankful that your amazing support has enabled us to protect almost 1,300 people from the worst of the monsoon rains.

But the heavy rains cause other problems too. The earthquakes destroyed over 36,000 classrooms leaving over one million kids with a place to learn. Proper repair and reconstruction of schools is impossible during the monsoon. So temporary classrooms are essential for getting kids back into education.

Our main focus for such classrooms is currently in Sindhupalchok, the worst affected of all Nepal’s districts. Sindhupalchok lost over 4,000 classrooms and the devastation here is epic.

The Nepalese resilience is inspirational through, and so we’re not put off by the scale of the challenge. Instead we’re focusing on what we can do. And we're steadily get more and more kids back to school with each week that passes.

At the Balephi Secondary school we recently provided a sturdy bamboo framed tent, with tin walls around the bottom to keep the ground water out. We also repaired school benches to give the kids somewhere to sit.

This provided functional classrooms but, recognising that many kids have suffered a lot of trauma and distress, we also wanted to give them a little fun.

So, to finish the temporary classrooms we invited the kids to paint the inside of the tin walls. They painted flags, buddha, lotus flowers, scenes from the countryside and much more. The kids loved being able to decorate their own classroom and seeing the smiles on their faces reminded us once again how much strength and beauty there is Nepal.

So, despite the monsoon, and the devastation left by the earthquake, we continue to work alongside survivors, and draw strength from each other as we do.

Thank you so much for making this possible!

This July 15 GlobalGiving will be matching donations to our Nepal projects by an amazing 50%.

Matching will start at 9am Eastern Time (or 1pm in the UK) and donations up to $1,000 (or £600 in the UK) will be matched per donor while funds remain. So, please consider making a gift on July 15, and please also spread the word about this incredible opportunity.

As always, if you ever have any queries about how we’re using your donation, please don’t hesitate to email Andy@IDVolunteers.org. I would be delighted to hear from you

Survivors descend to meet our food aid
Survivors descend to meet our food aid
Families receiving roofing tin you provided
Families receiving roofing tin you provided
Kids decorating the classrooms you provided
Kids decorating the classrooms you provided
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The tent frame with rubble and mountains behind
The tent frame with rubble and mountains behind

As IDV’s CEO I recently flew to Nepal to support our team and see the situation on the ground for myself. As part of this trip I was fortunate enough to travel to Arukharka, in Nuwakot district, in order to deliver and help set up a temporary classroom for the community’s high school.

Arukharka is only about 40 miles from Kathmandu but it’s remote, mountainous location means that the journey takes about 4 hours. The first 2 hours are easy enough as the roads are in relatively good condition. But then you have to leave the main road and start along a bone-jarring, rocky track up the mountain itself.

Happily I don’t suffer from vertigo as the track is incredibly narrow and at times the 4x4 we hired for the trip had to squeeze between large boulders and the steep drop down into the valley below.

It’s a tiring journey but once we arrived in Arukharka it all became worth it as the villagers warmly welcomed us with a delicious lunch of “Dal Bhat”, which consists of steamed rice and lentil soup.

After lunch, and a refreshing cup of local tea, or “Chai”, we set to work on the temporary classroom. As school was supposed to start last week we wanted to get a classroom set up as soon as possible and so in this case we’d decided to use a 6m by 14m military tent.

The tent canvas alone weighs more than 60kg and so rather than also transport its large, heavy metal frame up the mountain we’d asked the villagers to cut down and dry bamboo we could use instead.

We immediately got to work setting out fourteen bamboo posts for the classroom’s main skeleton. It was hard work digging holes and hand mixing concrete for the posts but by working alongside the school teachers and kids’ parents we got this important work done by the end of the day.

We then ate more Dal Bhat for dinner and pitched our tents for the night. We woke just after dawn the next day, partly because the village always rises early to make the most of the daylight, but also because we were keen to finish the work we’d started.

On this second day we were joined by some skilled local builders to undertake the more complicated job of framing the classroom roof.  Bamboo is a traditional building material in Nepal and it was amazing to learn from the local builders as they selected, cut and shaped the bamboo as needed.

It was another long day but by dusk the tent canvas was lifted over the frame and the job was pretty much done. There’s definitely more help still needed at the school but we were all delighted to have set the tent up as this will allow at least 50 of the village kids to start class again.

What’s more it was an incredible privilege to be welcomed into the village and to work hand in hand with such beautiful, strong people.

This was the fifth tent our team has provided in the last two weeks and we’re looking forward to building many more classrooms in the weeks and months ahead.

This work is only possible because of your amazing support and we hope some of the photos in this report also show what your generosity is making possible.  Thank you so much!

As always, if you ever have any queries about how we’re using your donation, please don’t hesitate to email Andy@IDVolunteers.org. I would be delighted to hear from you.

Architect Ruth with kids and damaged school behind
Architect Ruth with kids and damaged school behind
Modern tools meet traditional materials
Modern tools meet traditional materials
The finished tent at dusk
The finished tent at dusk
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We've provided 655 people with shelter materials
We've provided 655 people with shelter materials

On Tuesday May 12 Nepal was struck by the second major earthquake in less than three weeks.

The original earthquake killed more than 8,000 people and injured many thousands more. Millions of survivors were already in need of relief when the second earthquake struck.

This second earthquake caused more deaths, injuries and property damage in areas already devastated by the initial disaster.

Thanks to your incredible generosity we’ve already helped 785 earthquake survivors and are helping more with every day that passes.

We originally arrived in Nepal with 120 kg of shelter materials, which were immediately transported to Arukharka (Area 2) in Nuwakot district.

In Arukharka these materials were distributed to 110 families. In total 85 families received tarps and 25 families received tents. These tarpaulins and tents are now providing emergency shelter for around 550 people.

Our materials met the urgent need for shelter in the community and we’ll soon be helping families in Arukharka further by providing food aid.

There are 10 families in the community who lost their food stores in the first earthquake.  These stores of rice and lentils were contaminated by toxic dust from the rubble, or are still buried inside collapsed or damaged buildings.

Affected families are being supported by their neighbours for now, but overall food supply is very limited and these families urgently need food aid in order to survive until September, when their next crops will be ready.

We’ll be delivering the first of this food aid to Arukharka in the coming days.

With these immediate needs met in Arukharka we’ve also turned our attention to other communities that still need relief.

For example, we’ve provided tents to 21 families in Tukucha Nala, in Kabhrepalanchok district, southeast of Kathmandu. These tents are now being used as shelter by approximately 105 earthquake survivors.

We’ve also begun working with the Village Development Committee (VDC) in Tukucha Nala by providing Shelter Repair Kits to families identified by the VDC.

Many families are already constructing frames for new shelters using bamboo, which is locally prevalent and easily sourced. However, survivors are limited to what other materials they can salvage from their homes.

In response we’re now preparing and distributing Shelter Repair Kits that include materials such as roofing sheets and fixings. These kits are allowing families to complete their own shelters by providing them with the needed materials.

By supporting the existing efforts of survivors we’re also building their confidence and ability to take charge of their own recovery. This will make them more resilient in the long-term.

Our first 26 kits were distributed on May 14, 2015, and were provided to families in Area 5 of Tukucha.  These families represent around 130 people, which means that we’ve now already helped 785 earthquake survivors.

We've also committed to providing a further 25 kits to families in Area 4 of Tukucha. These additional kits will be provided in the coming days.

We are aiming to provide at least another 85 shelter repair kits in Tukucha, and many more in other communities too.

However, we urgently need more funds to make this work possible.

The contents of our kits currently cost around $100 per family. This means that for $20 you can put a roof over one person’s head.

The monsoon season is fast approaching so please consider donating today if you can.

As always, if you ever have any questions about how we’re using your donation, please don’t hesitate to email Andy@IDVolunteers.org. I would be delighted to hear from you.

We've provided 130 people with Shelter Repair Kits
We've provided 130 people with Shelter Repair Kits
We have another 563 kg of supplies on route
We have another 563 kg of supplies on route
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Organization Information

International Disaster Volunteers (IDV)

Location: Bristol, Somerset - United Kingdom
Website:
Facebook: Facebook Page
Twitter: @IDVMedia
Project Leader:
Andy Chaggar
Bristol, Somerset United Kingdom

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