Hope for begging talibe children, St-Louis Senegal

by Maison de la Gare
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Hope for begging talibe children, St-Louis Senegal
Hope for begging talibe children, St-Louis Senegal
Hope for begging talibe children, St-Louis Senegal
Hope for begging talibe children, St-Louis Senegal
Hope for begging talibe children, St-Louis Senegal
Hope for begging talibe children, St-Louis Senegal
Hope for begging talibe children, St-Louis Senegal
Hope for begging talibe children, St-Louis Senegal
Hope for begging talibe children, St-Louis Senegal
Hope for begging talibe children, St-Louis Senegal
Hope for begging talibe children, St-Louis Senegal
Hope for begging talibe children, St-Louis Senegal
Hope for begging talibe children, St-Louis Senegal
Hope for begging talibe children, St-Louis Senegal
Hope for begging talibe children, St-Louis Senegal
Hope for begging talibe children, St-Louis Senegal
Hope for begging talibe children, St-Louis Senegal
Hope for begging talibe children, St-Louis Senegal
Hope for begging talibe children, St-Louis Senegal
Hope for begging talibe children, St-Louis Senegal
Hope for begging talibe children, St-Louis Senegal
Hope for begging talibe children, St-Louis Senegal
Hope for begging talibe children, St-Louis Senegal
Hope for begging talibe children, St-Louis Senegal
Hope for begging talibe children, St-Louis Senegal
Hope for begging talibe children, St-Louis Senegal
Hope for begging talibe children, St-Louis Senegal
Hope for begging talibe children, St-Louis Senegal
Hope for begging talibe children, St-Louis Senegal
Hope for begging talibe children, St-Louis Senegal
Hope for begging talibe children, St-Louis Senegal
Hope for begging talibe children, St-Louis Senegal
Hope for begging talibe children, St-Louis Senegal
Hope for begging talibe children, St-Louis Senegal
Hope for begging talibe children, St-Louis Senegal
Hope for begging talibe children, St-Louis Senegal
Hope for begging talibe children, St-Louis Senegal
Hope for begging talibe children, St-Louis Senegal
Hope for begging talibe children, St-Louis Senegal
Hope for begging talibe children, St-Louis Senegal
Hope for begging talibe children, St-Louis Senegal
Hope for begging talibe children, St-Louis Senegal
Hope for begging talibe children, St-Louis Senegal
Hope for begging talibe children, St-Louis Senegal
Hope for begging talibe children, St-Louis Senegal
Hope for begging talibe children, St-Louis Senegal
Hope for begging talibe children, St-Louis Senegal
Hope for begging talibe children, St-Louis Senegal
Hope for begging talibe children, St-Louis Senegal
Hope for begging talibe children, St-Louis Senegal
Hope for begging talibe children, St-Louis Senegal
Hope for begging talibe children, St-Louis Senegal
Hope for begging talibe children, St-Louis Senegal
Hope for begging talibe children, St-Louis Senegal
Hope for begging talibe children, St-Louis Senegal
Hope for begging talibe children, St-Louis Senegal
Hope for begging talibe children, St-Louis Senegal
Hope for begging talibe children, St-Louis Senegal
Hope for begging talibe children, St-Louis Senegal
Hope for begging talibe children, St-Louis Senegal
Hope for begging talibe children, St-Louis Senegal
Hope for begging talibe children, St-Louis Senegal
Hope for begging talibe children, St-Louis Senegal
Hope for begging talibe children, St-Louis Senegal
Hope for begging talibe children, St-Louis Senegal
Hope for begging talibe children, St-Louis Senegal
Hope for begging talibe children, St-Louis Senegal
Hope for begging talibe children, St-Louis Senegal
Hope for begging talibe children, St-Louis Senegal
Hope for begging talibe children, St-Louis Senegal
Hope for begging talibe children, St-Louis Senegal
Hope for begging talibe children, St-Louis Senegal
Hope for begging talibe children, St-Louis Senegal
Hope for begging talibe children, St-Louis Senegal
Hope for begging talibe children, St-Louis Senegal
Hope for begging talibe children, St-Louis Senegal
Hope for begging talibe children, St-Louis Senegal
Hope for begging talibe children, St-Louis Senegal
Hope for begging talibe children, St-Louis Senegal
Hope for begging talibe children, St-Louis Senegal
Hope for begging talibe children, St-Louis Senegal

Restrictions are easing, and the talibé children are returning to Maison de la Gare’s center as an oasis in their difficult lives

For over three months, the begging talibé children of Senegal have been largely confined to their daaras, unable to beg for their food or to take advantage of the oasis and hope that Maison de la Gare’s center offers them. Thanks to emergency grants from several of our long-term funders, to the amazing generosity of hundreds of individual donors and to the dedication of dozens of devoted angels, the neighborhood Godmothers of Saint Louis, we have been able to organize and finance nutritious daily meals for close to 2,500 of these children.

This phase of the crisis is now coming to an end, although not everyone is happy about this. The valiant Godmothers of the neighborhood of Guinaw Rail in Saint Louis have been preparing food for nearly 400 talibé children in their area. One 9-year-old boy, Mody, came every day with his large bowl, and every day he asked the same question: “When will the Corona leave?” One day a Godmother asked why he always had the same question. He replied “Since the Corona came, we don’t have to go begging in the streets anymore. We can wash at the Godmothers’ place. And you give us good meals every day.” The Godmother broke down in tears and explained that she realized that even the talibés aspire to a joyful, healthy, and stable life.

While this period has been positive for Mody, for many thousands of other talibé children it has been incredibly challenging. Many have not had adequate food or access to hygiene facilities. And cuts, bruises and other medical problems have festered untended.

As of early June, the 8 p.m. curfew has been lifted along with restrictions on travel between different regions of Senegal. We have reopened our center, and the children are coming back.

This will be a careful, step-by-step process. To begin, we are welcoming the children to simply relax and enjoy their friends again, to wash their clothes, take a shower and use the toilets. The children wash their hands with soap and water on entering the center. And Kalidou and Elhage in the sewing apprenticeship center are busy fabricating face masks for them. Awa is busy in the infirmary, with a line of boys waiting to have wounds and other problems cared for.

Over the coming weeks and months, we will progressively expand our other activities for these children. Our teachers will resume regular literacy classes, either in our classrooms or in selected daaras. Organized soccer and karate will resume. And our night rounds team will resume their search for children in extreme distress living on the streets.

____________

We are grateful to our individual donors and to organizations that have funded our programs over the years. You made it possible for us to help the children through these exceedingly difficult times. We must specifically thank GO Campaign, Global Fund for Children, GlobalGiving and the Kulczyk Foundation for emergency grants that made it possible to expand and extend our program feeding the children in their daaras far beyond what we had originally thought possible.

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With your help, neighborhood Godmothers are now feeding close to 2,500 talibé children every day

How quickly life can change! From hopeful anticipation, to unimaginable disaster, to tragedy forestalled, all in one month! But with uncertain funding and an unknown path for the pandemic, the future remains terrifyingly unknown for the forced begging street children, talibés, of Maison de la Gare.

COVID-19 changed everything. Flights were cancelled, international volunteers were recalled home, countries were locked down.

It did not take long for things to escalate from bad to very much worse.  As you know from our report last month, Senegal, with limited medical means to fight the virus, quickly moved to lock down the country. Within days internal travel was restricted, streets emptied, and doors closed. Even Maison de la Gare - a last resort oasis of hope and caring for so many talibés - was forced to close its doors.  The team pivoted and responded by providing soap, disinfectant, and hygiene instruction for the children on location in their daaras.  

Confinement and curfew soon tragically complicated the lives of thousands of children.  In Saint-Louis, you normally cannot take a step without bumping into a child dressed in rags who is asking for some coins or food. However, since the coming of Covid-19, with the population afraid and hidden away in their homes, thousands of begging talibé children were left with no access to food.

The amazing neighborhood Godmothers who have helped us to respond to this desperate situation are still at it, seven days a week. Thanks to our incredible donors, thanks to your response, we are still able to support these wonderful women with 800,000 francs (about $1,300 US) each week for their purchases of food. And we are providing masks and hygiene support in the daaras.

This is a terrible situation for the children. Imagine 30 to 70 or more children living together, locked down in a confined space with no hygiene facilities, no access to potable water and very rudimentary shelter. And, for active children, nothing to do!

But there is some encouraging news. For the first time in decades, there are almost no children begging on Senegal’s streets! Is there a possibility to build on this for a more positive future?

Two possible avenues for this are now being modelled, thanks to the pandemic. The first is that some daaras, for whom this is possible, are being allowed and encouraged to return to their home communities. The government and community organization CDPE (Departmental Committee for Child Protection) is organizing this and we are using some of your donations to support the cost. In parallel, we are expanding our support to Cheikh Diallo and the schools of Mbaye Aw as more daaras and children are returning home to that region.

For some daaras, return to their home communities is not a possibility. Could many of these be transitioned to “modern daaras” where the children are not forced to beg? The dedicated Godmothers could be part of this solution as they have been in this moment of crisis. Also, for a dozen or so daaras in proximity to our center, we are developing a plan with municipal authorities by which several hundred talibé children could come every day for the full day, as though they were going to school. This also is something that we could build on.

 

It is impossible to know what the coming weeks and months have in store for the talibé children. What we do know is that, with your help, we will continue to do everything in our power to make their plight more livable. And, perhaps, to take some steps towards Maison de la Gare’s vision of eliminating the scourge of child begging.

A Godmother cooking for the talibes
A Godmother cooking for the talibes
Talibes enjoying a meal
Talibes enjoying a meal
MDG's Mamadou, Bouri and Ndaraw with Godmother
MDG's Mamadou, Bouri and Ndaraw with Godmother
Talibe children wearing their new masks
Talibe children wearing their new masks
Constant focus on good hygiene practices
Constant focus on good hygiene practices
Feeding the children where they are
Feeding the children where they are

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Children arrive seeking their only meal of the day
Children arrive seeking their only meal of the day

Confinement and curfew tragically complicate the lives of thousands of children.  With no one on the streets, there is no one to beg from.

"The situation is explosive," says Issa Kouyaté.

In Saint Louis, you normally can not take a step without tripping over a child dressed in rags who asks for some coins for food.  However, since the coming of Covid-19 everything has changed.  The measures taken by the government to try to contain the spread of the virus and the fear that is beginning to spread among the population have resulted in people staying in their homes.  Thousands of begging talibé children are left with no access to food.  Some families in remote regions of the country demanded that their children be returned home.  However, the government’s prohibition of travel between different regions of the country prevents this.

When this crisis first arrived in Senegal, Maison de la Gare responded quickly by closing its center and providing soap, disinfectant and hygiene instruction for the children in their daaras.  We reported on this last month.  However, we soon realized that this is not enough.  The children have nothing to eat, and we have committed all our resources to feeding them. 

We are now providing nutritious daily meals to over 1,500 talibé children each day in their daaras.

How is this possible?  It is thanks to the brave and dedicated women of the Ndèye daaras, the “Godmothers” in each neighborhood of Saint Louis who have committed themselves to responding to the desperate situation of the talibé children.  We are working with groups of these amazing women in each of ten neighborhoods of Saint Louis, including the north and south island, Pikine, Balacoss, Ndiolofène, Darou, Diamimar, Médina Course, Eaux claires and Léona. 

In each of these neighborhoods, the women are cooking each day for the children of four to seven daaras located close to their base.  Each of these daaras typically has 30 to 70 children, so many children are being reached.  We provide funds at the beginning of each week so that the women can do the shopping.  They are very effective at this, asking vendors in the market for their support for the needy children.  Many respond generously, with the result that the funds go much further than they normally would. 

The food is distributed to the children’s daaras in the large stainless-steel bowls that are very common for communal meals in Senegal. 

With this program now underway, we have been able to give more attention to hygiene awareness for the children and everyone involved.  The apprentices in the sewing program in our centre have been working long hours fabricating face masks; over a thousand of these have now been distributed. 

We are deeply grateful to everyone who has responded to this situation with emergency support of our efforts.  We received emergency grants from Global Fund for Children and from GO Campaign which will allow us to keep going for over five weeks.  Many individual donors have also stepped forward to help us sustain the effort.  And other organizations in Saint Louis and the city government are beginning to adopt this model in neighborhoods and daaras that we have not been able to reach.

Thank you, everyone.  The struggle continues.

A neighborhood "Godmother" preparing the meal
A neighborhood "Godmother" preparing the meal
Meals ready to go, with MDG's Ndaraw and Mamadou
Meals ready to go, with MDG's Ndaraw and Mamadou
Tailoring apprentice fabricating a mask
Tailoring apprentice fabricating a mask
Idy Diallo distributes masks to talibe children
Idy Diallo distributes masks to talibe children
A meal ready for delivery to talibe children
A meal ready for delivery to talibe children
The happy result, over 1,500 children fed each day
The happy result, over 1,500 children fed each day

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Maison de la Gare faces an extraordinary challenge in responding to this global pandemic

Not just one life, but a whole nation!!!

Maison de la Gare has had to make a very difficult and consequential decision, to temporarily close its welcome center for the talibé children. We and the children we serve are facing very serious challenges as a totally unexpected threat is upending normal life.

The coronavirus Covid-19 made its way from Asia to Europe and America, and it is now spreading around the world. The countries that were affected first, although rich and developed, could not do anything to stop it other than by isolation. African countries like Senegal are not prepared to deal with this pandemic. Senegal registered its first case on March 2nd. Three weeks later, there are more than thirty cases. The Senegalese Head of State, Macky Sall, has ordered the closure of schools and universities and even places of worship, as well as the cancellation of all public gatherings.

Maison de la Gare works with talibé children who have been left stranded, along with others of the most vulnerable in society who are most affected by infectious diseases. The government has made no decisions regarding the daaras. The ban on welcoming children to schools to prevent transmission of the virus should be applied also in daaras where there is much less hygienic protection and where children are exposed to all kinds of contagious diseases. The danger in some daaras is very high and potentially fraught with dire consequences.

Having had to close its welcome center, Maison de la Gare’s team is now carrying out an awareness campaign in the poorest Saint Louis daaras, doing their best to protect the most vulnerable against the Covid-19 threat.

Among other initiatives, we are distributing hygiene kits in dozens of daaras housing more than 2,000 talibé children who are particularly exposed to communicable or contagious diseases. We are educating both the marabouts and the children about the threat and are encouraging the marabouts to keep their talibés off the streets. And we are demonstrating to both the children and the marabouts how to wash their hands effectively and to respect basic hygiene practices. The hygiene kits that we are distributing typically include soap, hand sanitizer and bleach.

We sincerely hope that this scourge will soon be under control so that we will be able to relaunch our programs for the talibé children, to help them find hope and direction in their difficult lives.

In the meantime, we will be adapting day by day to the changing situation, doing everything in our power to help the most vulnerable. We are grateful to everyone in the global community who supports our work and makes it possible for us to do this.

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Katia and Mila with children in the classroom
Katia and Mila with children in the classroom

Mila and Katia share their experience volunteering together

My mother and I have been fortunate to travel around the world and to discover many cultures, at times seeing extreme poverty. We have wanted for a long time to get involved in a humanitarian project together, although we didn’t know what this could be or how we would do it. We therefore left home with the simple purpose of helping, of making ourselves useful within this organization.

Maison de la Gare gave us an experience far beyond our expectations, much more than a simple "project". We were able to get a feeling for the life of the talibés in all its facets … their everyday lives on the streets, their rudimentary needs (washing their clothes and themselves) and learning the rules of life in society, but also their physical and emotional wounds and their precarious living conditions in their daaras.

What a wonderful feeling to see them smile and to make them forget, if only for a moment, their lives on the streets, through creative play activities, songs and lessons in French or mathematics.

My mother (a mother of two) and I (a 17-year-old high school student) lived this experience differently ... but we shared it fully, together.

We were very moved by these children who only ask to escape their difficult lives through their desire to learn, to discover, to create and to show their pride in their beautiful drawings and other creations.

On the last day of our stay Abdou, a child to whom I had taught notions of poetry, wrote me a very powerful poem. He announced to me that he had just been accepted in a high school in Saint-Louis, the lifelong dream of this self-taught child. It was a moment of emotion and pride. I felt like I had contributed a little to a "better life" for a talibé child. Teaching children basic literacy and reintegrating them in society is one of the priority missions of volunteers and members of Maison de la Gare.

I will remember the day of my birthday as both unforgettable and overwhelming because, for the talibés, it is a day like any other. These young children stood in front of me, singing and dancing, but none of them understood the meaning of the word "birthday"; most do not even know their date of birth!

Carrying out a humanitarian project like this brought my mother and me a lot closer and enabled us to support each other during certain trying times. On the last day, we agreed to accompany Maison de la Gare’s night-rounds team. That night we needed each other to overcome the images of children sleeping on the ground in the unhealthy and dangerous bus terminal. Abandoned, often mistreated, they preferred to flee their daara or their family, and they found shelter for the night at Maison de la Gare. The next morning, everything is set in motion to find the children’s families and to understand what could have pushed them to put themselves in such danger.

During these few days shared with the talibés, we became aware of the fundamental role of NGOs like Maison de la Gare that work night and day for the well-being of these neglected children. Beyond what we were able to do ourselves, it is Maison de la Gare’s values and its people that will always remain etched in our memories.

Our host Mama Touty was truly a welcoming "mother"; heart in hand, she welcomed us as her children.

We were the first mother-daughter duo to live this unforgettable experience and we warmly thank Maison de la Gare and everyone who is a part of it.

Mila treats the foot wound of an older talibe
Mila treats the foot wound of an older talibe
Mila with her art class
Mila with her art class
Mila tutors Buaro, our karate leader
Mila tutors Buaro, our karate leader
Katia helps a talibe student
Katia helps a talibe student
Katia and  Mila, very moved by a visit to a daara
Katia and Mila, very moved by a visit to a daara
Mila leading games in Maison de la Gare courtyard
Mila leading games in Maison de la Gare courtyard
Celebration with Noel, Kalidou, Adama, Lala, Abdou
Celebration with Noel, Kalidou, Adama, Lala, Abdou

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Organization Information

Maison de la Gare

Location: Saint Louis - Senegal
Website:
Project Leader:
Rod LeRoy
Saint Louis, Saint-Louis Senegal
$130,526 raised of $139,500 goal
 
1,652 donations
$8,974 to go
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