Help save the Bare-Nosed Wombat

by Wombat Support and Rescue NSW/ACT Incorporated
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Help save the Bare-Nosed Wombat
Help save the Bare-Nosed Wombat
Help save the Bare-Nosed Wombat
Help save the Bare-Nosed Wombat
Help save the Bare-Nosed Wombat
Help save the Bare-Nosed Wombat
Help save the Bare-Nosed Wombat
Help save the Bare-Nosed Wombat
Help save the Bare-Nosed Wombat
Help save the Bare-Nosed Wombat
Help save the Bare-Nosed Wombat
Help save the Bare-Nosed Wombat
Help save the Bare-Nosed Wombat
Help save the Bare-Nosed Wombat
Help save the Bare-Nosed Wombat
Help save the Bare-Nosed Wombat
Help save the Bare-Nosed Wombat
Help save the Bare-Nosed Wombat
Help save the Bare-Nosed Wombat
Help save the Bare-Nosed Wombat
Help save the Bare-Nosed Wombat
Help save the Bare-Nosed Wombat
Help save the Bare-Nosed Wombat
Help save the Bare-Nosed Wombat
Help save the Bare-Nosed Wombat
Help save the Bare-Nosed Wombat
Help save the Bare-Nosed Wombat
Help save the Bare-Nosed Wombat
Help save the Bare-Nosed Wombat
Help save the Bare-Nosed Wombat
Help save the Bare-Nosed Wombat
Help save the Bare-Nosed Wombat
Help save the Bare-Nosed Wombat
Help save the Bare-Nosed Wombat
Help save the Bare-Nosed Wombat
Help save the Bare-Nosed Wombat
Help save the Bare-Nosed Wombat

The project we started at the Brindabella Hills Winery has finally come to an end.

This beautiful location facing the Brindabella mountains with the Murrubmidgee river flowing down below is home to a stunning winery. But it's also home to a small population of our bare-nosed wombats.

Sadly, these wombats, as with a large percentage of wombats across Australia, have been infected with sarcoptic mange. This is a parasite (similar to scabies) that burrows into their skin and cause immense itching, fur-loss, and eventual death.

We set to work and over a period of 12 months we treated them every week while monitoring their progress via motion censor wildlife cameras.

The change now to where we started is huge. They are all healthy, fat and glossy and the female we treated first now has a little joey (baby) of her own who is playful and happy with his mum.

Our thanks as always goes to the landowners who love wildlife, who is willing to help them and willing to allow us access on their property to help these beautiful creatures.

Thank you for your continued support to help us save as many wombats as we can!

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Most of our work takes us into the bush, working with wild wombats.

There are not enough facilities to take every wombat that is sick or manged into care. The need is just to big and the resources to few. But for those adult wombats that are sick and are reported, we have a fighting chance to save them.

It takes a long time and lots of dedication and perseverance. We have to track them, find where they live and start treating them, sometimes for months until they are healed. It's a big commitment.

This doesn't solve the problem entirely though. This wombat may be better but mange is incredibly contagious and if one wombat in a population has it, the other wombats will too. We try to implement population treatment programs where we treat every burrow in a specific area, regardless of how many wombats there are.

This is an even bigger and more expensive commitment. It takes hundreds of man hours for a team of volunteers to scout for burrows, map and mark them and install treatment equipment called burrow-flaps. Weekly treatment is required for months.

But when you see results like Romeo you know it's all worth it. Romeo was so badly manged that most of his body was covered in thick plaques which is the result of the sarcoptic mange mites burrowing into his skin. It's thick and hard and can be suffocating. He has lost a lot of fur and his eyes and ears have crusted over. He was almost blind and had to navigate his surroundings by smell and hearing only. He did so remarkably.

In just a few weeks after treatment started Romeo starting losing the dead skin crusts and new skin was starting to form underneath. We kept treating his skin for bleeding as the crusts fell off and left some patches raw and bleeding. But eventually those healed and he is on his way to recovery.

This work, to help wombats out there, is immense, and not possible without the help of those who financially support it.

Thank you providing that support and means for us to do the work we do to save them, one wombat at a time

kind regards

Yolandi Vermaak

Wombat Rescue

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The first time I saw Cotter
The first time I saw Cotter

A couple of months ago, I was climbing a little mountain in search of a manged wombat reported to me, when I got a call that a very sick wombat was spotted near the Cotter campground on the other side of town.

Giving up the search as I couldn't find the first wombat, I went in search of the Cotter wombat. When I found him he was grazing near the river but very evidently manged and very sick. I named him Cotter. He was blind from the thick crusty skin plaques that formed over his eyes. When wombats have mange, they will die without intervention.

His mange treatment program started right there and he was given antibacterial antiseptic spray as well to help his wounds heal and keep flies away. When a wombat has mange, they itch so badly that they scratch until they have deep open wounds.

After his treatment started, weekly searches commenced to find him as I had to keep giving him medicine and needed to find where his burrow was. I finally found him sleeping in a drainpipe where he spent his days as he was too sick to burrow.

Slowly but surely, week after week, there were small improvements. First his eyes started to slowly open as the plaques started to fall off, and the rest of the thick plaques on his body started falling off too

Underneath was new pink skin and finally I could see some new healthy hair growing.

Cotter is a male wombat but not aggressive and very calm. He was fairly tolerant of me being near him and giving him medicine.

Thank you for supporting this journey with saving the bare-nosed wombat species. Every wombat deserves a chance at life and whenever a wombat is called in, they deserve the very best of attention that we can give them. This would not be possible without your kind support. A heartfelt thank you from wombat Cotter too

From the Wombat Rescue team

He can finally see
He can finally see

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The owner of a beatiful winery just outside of Canberra asked me to help with a very sick wombat which had mange.

I helped this wombat but realised there are more wombats living on the property and they would all have mange as it's a highly contagious parasite (mange occurs throughout the world, in humans it's called scabies)

We scouted all the gulleys and possible sites where you would expect to find a burrow (wombats live underground in burrows) and identified 10 active burrows.

I built the necessary burrow flaps to install over each burrow. These consist of metal frames with an ice-cream lid fixed to the frame with cable ties that act like a doggy door and a peanut butter jar lid placed in a gap in the middle of the ice-cream lid where we put the medicine in to treat the wombat for mange

When the wombat enters or exits the burrow, the lid tilts and the medicine pours onto their back. Working with animals that are nocturnal, scared of humans and elusive, this is the best method to treat them

To monitor our progress I placed 3 motion censor infrared nightvsion wildlife cameras in front of 3 burrows to record them. It was clear that every wombat filmed was manged. But after a few weeks of treatment the wombats started to look better, new hair is growing in bald patches where they lost their hair and the crusty scabs are falling off

The project is halfway and will continue for another 2-3 months until all wombats and their environment are cleared of mange. Without intervention wombats afflicted with mange face months of incredible agony, deaf- and blindness, organ failure, hunger and ultimately certain death

 

Projects like this is time intensive and every piece of equipment and medicine is acquired with donations. Without your help this would not be possible and we wouldn't be able to help as many wombats are we currently are

Thank you so much for your support, 

From the Wombat Rescue team and every wombat saved

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Organization Information

Wombat Support and Rescue NSW/ACT Incorporated

Location: Canberra, Australian Capital Territory - Australia
Website:
Facebook: Facebook Page
Project Leader:
Yolandi Vermaak
Canberra, ACT Australia
$34,653 raised of $69,000 goal
 
749 donations
$34,347 to go
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