Save a Horse: Rescue and Rehabilitate Mustangs

by Action Change (Formerly GVI Trust)
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Save a Horse: Rescue and Rehabilitate Mustangs
Save a Horse: Rescue and Rehabilitate Mustangs
Save a Horse: Rescue and Rehabilitate Mustangs
Save a Horse: Rescue and Rehabilitate Mustangs
Save a Horse: Rescue and Rehabilitate Mustangs
Save a Horse: Rescue and Rehabilitate Mustangs
Save a Horse: Rescue and Rehabilitate Mustangs
Save a Horse: Rescue and Rehabilitate Mustangs
Save a Horse: Rescue and Rehabilitate Mustangs
Save a Horse: Rescue and Rehabilitate Mustangs
Save a Horse: Rescue and Rehabilitate Mustangs
Save a Horse: Rescue and Rehabilitate Mustangs
Save a Horse: Rescue and Rehabilitate Mustangs
Cloud
Cloud

Dear Supporter, 

This month we thought it would be a good idea to tell you some stories of the beneficiaries of your donations. I hope that you enjoy them!

Cloud is a wild horse who came into Wild Horse Rescue Centre (WHRC) in 2010 as a wild, abused mustang age 2. She was thin and afraid. After we gentled her she was adopted. The family who adopted her had to move out of state and asked us to take her back so she returned to WHRC at age 5, she was not saddle trained yet, so WHRC saddle trained her. She is one of our centres riding horses for our international program. She is super people friendly and such a beautiful example of the American Wild Horse with intelligence and endurance.

Romeo, Cloud and Ford are three of our mustangs who live with us permanently. Romeo came into the WHRC back in 2005 as a six year old stallion, starved and wild. His halter had grown into his face because it was put on as a two year old. The person had him for four years, but was still unable to handle him. Romeo is a spokesman for WHRC, he attends festivals and schools to teach people about these amazing horses.

Ford has been with us for 5 years and she was already tame, so she became a great teacher for those who had visited but were afraid, Ford’s gentle ways taught many volunteers that they could trust a horse. She rode many people in such a kind caring way, she is now retired due to age and the accompanying aliments, but we still care for her daily, just no more riding . So she is still able to touch the hearts and souls of people from around the world.

Sophie going for a ride on Kayottee. Kayottee is a rescued mustang, she came into WHRC as a two year old, with two other abused mustangs, who were not as lucky as she. One of them died peacefully under veterinary as she was too far gone to regain her health.  The other one had suffered too much abuse and as a result has become a sanctuary mustang because she is mentally unstable. But Kayotte made it! She has even been a show horse at Arabian Nights dinner theatre in Orlando Florida for a few years! When the show ended, Kayottee returned to us to be part of our international riding program.

Copen is one of our smaller four leggered friends. She is 15 years old and we consider her the Story Teller, she always go in the pens with the new horses and just sits or lays in there as if to tell them it will be ok......we adore her each and every day we have with her.

We hope that you enjoyed the stories of these animals and the incredible journeys that they have been on. It is thanks to your donations that they have been able to be rehabilitated and cared for. 

With Gratitude, 

Diane, Wild Horse Rescue Centre

Romeo, Cloud and Ford
Romeo, Cloud and Ford
Sophie and Kayottee
Sophie and Kayottee
Copen
Copen

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6 year- old Chevis
6 year- old Chevis

Dear Supporter, 

Diane inadvertently started the rescue centre in 2001 with just one mustang- after she agreed to help the one horse, more just kept on coming! So in 2007 she registered the Wild Horse Rescue Centre (WHRC) as a non-profit and the volunteer program started in 2011.

Currently, the WHRC is home to 47 horses, of that number 40 are mustangs, 4 mix horses and 3 burros. Since the beginning of 2015 Diane and her team have managed to get 3 mustangs and 2 burros adopted into loving homes, which makes space for more animals to join the rescue. The WHRC doesn't only look after hooved animals though we also have 12 dogs that we have given a home to and so far this year 1 of them has been adopted.Our goal is to get everyone healthy and happy and then adopted to good, caring homes.

Here are some of our current residents' stories.

Nanook and Keani are brothers and they both arrived at the WHRC severely underweight, plagued with worms and riddled with fleas. They were not happy dogs! Thanks to donations they have been nurse back to good health and they are healthy and happy again. They have also been groomed so that they can be comfortable in the hot Florida summer. 

Ford is a 25 year old mustang who came into the centre full of a lifetime of scars. She was very afraid but in time she learned to trust and has become a great care- taker of first time riders. She has just retired but still requires care and a safe place to live out her old age. 

Chevis is a 6-year-old California mustang who came to the WHRC in 2014. He was afraid as a result of past abuse. It has taken nearly a full year for staff at the WHRC to gain his trust. He is now ready for saddle training, which is a 2-3 month training process. 

We were able to bring in three burros also thanks to your funding. Jenny is a five-year-old burro who was wild and afraid. We gained her trust and she has become gentle and friendly, a process that took 4 months. She has since been adopted. Martha is the youngest burro who came to the WHRC completely wild. She is now tame and being adopted in June 2015.

Thank you for your continued support of the WHRC!

With Gratitude, 

GVI-Charitable Trust

Our burro, Martha
Our burro, Martha
Keani looking much healthier!
Keani looking much healthier!
Ford and all her scars
Ford and all her scars
Some of our volunteers riding the tame horses
Some of our volunteers riding the tame horses

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Pachinkco when she arrived at the WHRC
Pachinkco when she arrived at the WHRC

Dear Supporter, 

Meet Pachinkco, one of our rescues that your funding was able to help. 
Pachinkco is a 25 year old mustang who, when she arrived, was grossly under weight, had hoofs that were incredibly long and was totally wild. She was afraid of humans due to years of neglect and mishandling from people. This neglect also meant that she had no confidence and no pride left in her soul. Pachinkco was afraid and worried all the time and in incredible amounts of pain from her hoofs being too long, which caused discomfort to her legs and body. Her pain was so great that she couldn't even defend herself against the other horses she was with, who would try to take her hay and feed.
The first order of business was to get Pachinkco strong enough so that we could lay her down in order to trim her hoofs. A big problem that we are faced with in Florida is sand colic. So the first thing we had to do was get the sand out of her belly by feeding her large amounts of hay, especially alfalfa which is coarse and helps to push sand out of intestines. We also added a sand removal product to her grain. Next we had to de-wrom her. All of this is to make sure that Pachinkco was healthy enough for the sedation needed to be able to trim her hoofs. 

The hay alone is anywhere from $7.00-$36.00 per bale, depending on the type, then sanding product runs about $25 per week to use. Our vet, Dr. Seiler, has been out twice and is due to come out again in 2 weeks time. It takes many months to reshape the hoofs due to the many years of neglect. 

This is a costly process to say the least and your donations have gone a long way to help Pachinkco in her lengthy recovery. 

Thank you for your continued support of the Wild Horse Rescue Centre!

All the best, 

GVI Charitable Trust

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A view of our new home
A view of our new home

Dear Supporter,

The Wild Horse Rescue Center has moved to bigger property! We have come one step closer to expanding our impact by relocating to a new location that will give our horses a lot more room to move around. The new location is right next to the beautiful Lake Harney, is in a gated community and is an awesome 38,9 acres! Besides our beautiful horses, there are dogs and a bunch of other critters that can be spotted at our new home.

So far, we have been busy getting the fencing around the property done and have started organizing the barns. There is still a large to-do list such as bringing in more dirt, building holding pens, setting up a proper round pen, making a good washing area for the horses, setting up tying posts, building shelters for the horses in the pens etc.

The dream for this new property is to get rid of all the under bush so that we can see all the way down to the lake and grow grass for our horses so that they have the ultimate environment for rehabilitation.

We have also purchased an ex-school bus to join our growing team. At the moment, this vehicle provides us with enough space to haul everyone altogether, but in the future we hope that it will one day be used to give tours to see our beautiful wild horses out in the sanctuary. But first - the bus needs a face lift! Let the painting commence! 

Thank you for your continued support.

All the best

GVI Charitable Trust

One of our mustangs
One of our mustangs
Diane and two of our volunteers
Diane and two of our volunteers

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Dear Supporter, 

Great news! The Global Federation of Animal Sanctuaries (GFAS), the only globally recognized organization providing standards for identifying legitimate animal sanctuaries, awarded Verified status to Wild Horse Rescue Center.

Verification means that Wild Horse Rescue Center meets the criteria of a true equine sanctuary/rescue and is providing humane and responsible care of the animals. To be awarded Verified status, an organization must meet GFAS’s rigorous and peer-reviewed animal care standards which are confirmed by a site visit and they must also adhere to a demanding set of ethical and operational principles.

This is fantastic recognition for the work done at the centre. Moving forward, we hope as this project continues to see donations come in, we will be able to help more animals be rehabilitated!

Thank you for your support

GVI Charitable Trust

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Organization Information

Action Change (Formerly GVI Trust)

Location: London - United Kingdom
Website:
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Project Leader:
Tyrone Bennett
London, London United Kingdom
$19,950 raised of $26,000 goal
 
325 donations
$6,050 to go
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