Save a Horse: Rescue and Rehabilitate Mustangs

by Action Change (Formerly GVI Trust)
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Save a Horse: Rescue and Rehabilitate Mustangs
Save a Horse: Rescue and Rehabilitate Mustangs
Save a Horse: Rescue and Rehabilitate Mustangs
Save a Horse: Rescue and Rehabilitate Mustangs
Save a Horse: Rescue and Rehabilitate Mustangs
Save a Horse: Rescue and Rehabilitate Mustangs
Save a Horse: Rescue and Rehabilitate Mustangs
Save a Horse: Rescue and Rehabilitate Mustangs
Save a Horse: Rescue and Rehabilitate Mustangs
Save a Horse: Rescue and Rehabilitate Mustangs
Save a Horse: Rescue and Rehabilitate Mustangs
Save a Horse: Rescue and Rehabilitate Mustangs
Save a Horse: Rescue and Rehabilitate Mustangs
The temporary shelters
The temporary shelters

Dear Supporters, 

In 2014, we purchased our new property and left behind our permanent structures.  We have continued to clear out trees (Florida Pine and scrub palms- not very shady) to expand open areas for the horse corrals and paddocks.

Summers in Central Florida can bring brutally hot, humid days and nights that don’t cool off until the wee hours of the morning, as well as brief but heavy afternoon rain storms that just make a mess of all the new dirt (22 dump truck loads) we just brought in.

We purchased canopies back at the beginning of the summer to provide some shelter from the heat and the rain for the horse and dog pens; as a temporary measure.  Given these conditions, the canopies have already begun to weather and deteriorate from the elements as well as the bumping and jostling horses do while in the pens (they don’t stand still for very long). The canopies are 10 x 20 with lightweight, aluminium poles are made for stationary use, not for animal enclosures.  Given the price, something was better than nothing.

We really need a more permanent structure to provide the needed protection from the elements and allow both the horses and their human caregivers a better environment for health and safety reasons. 

The shelter, once installed, will allow us to use our movable panels to segregate the horses so we can inspect and groom them in a more effective and efficient manner; with well over 50 horses, you can imagine what a task that can be! 

The permanent structure will provide a uniform profile that will complement our existing barn and tack room.  We strongly believe this capital improvement is in the best interest of the horses that we care for and are excited to turn this dream into a reality.

Thank you for your continued support!

With Gratitude, 

Wild Horse Rescue Centre

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Diane and Epic
Diane and Epic

Dear Supporters, 

Today I want to tell you the story behind this picture. 

The photo is of Epic, a wild mustang gelding.  This specific breed of mustang is very wild and very beautiful. It is exceptionally hard to gain their trust as they have a truly wild heart and they are unfamiliar, and therefore wary of humans and human interaction. 

Epic was rounded up from the Kiger Mountains in Oregon last October 2015. He was adopted by another person, in January 2016, but she was having issues with gentling him. She reached out to us here at the Wild Horse Rescue Centre and in April we welcomed Epic to the farm for training and gentling. 

When he arrived he was so afraid and would not even look at you. He was so wary of us that as soon as he saw us he'd try to race away and do his best to keep from any interaction with us humans.

We finally managed to get him into the gentling pens which are 24'x24' square pens with 6' panels. In the picture, I am touching Epic with a bamboo pole, we call  this cane-poling. It is a form of touching before you can touch with your hand. The reason for this is because you can still keep enough distance between yourself and the horse, slowly working your way closer to be able to touch him by hand. 

It has taken since April working with Epic on a regular basis to finally get my first touch on his skin just the other day, the June 8. It took 3 months and it has been an incredibly rewarding journey. There is still a long way to go, but we are so pleased with the progress. 

We look forward to bringing you news of our progress with Epic in the coming months!

Thank you for your donations that make work like this possible. 

With Gratitude

Diane

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Beno and Beyonce
Beno and Beyonce

Dear Supporters, 

This month we'd like to tell you about Beno and Beyonce, two dogs who have been through too much hardship.

Beno and Beyonce came together from a shelter in Miami. These two old dogs were both blind and deaf and in very bad condition. They came to our rescue center extremely skinny that it became our mission to nurture them and coax them back to being healthy and happy.

With a lot of food, attention and a safe and calm place to stay, we saw some improvement in one of the two dogs. Our volunteers took them out in the sun which both of the dogs really appreciated.

WHRC took them to the veterinarian for a health check. Beyonce's blood test, unfortunately, showed that her body was shutting down. Additionally, she also had very bath teeth, which made it even harder for her to eat. Due to earlier injuries, she could barely walk. Beyonce seemed most of the time very sad and depressed. Not even petting and giving her love made her wag her tail. After a couple of months without any progress, we sadly decided to put her down. Our veterinary agreed to come to the center and as he put her down. Quietly we sat with her in the warm sun, holding her and showing her love during her last moments. She is now laid to rest in peace at our property.

On the other hand, the blood test of Beyonce's friend Beno showed better results. We decided to give him a second chance to live a happy life with lots of love and that’s what he gets now at our center. He has his own pen where he knows his way around even though he is blind and deaf. He gets lots of love and wags his tail whenever he gets a good, long scratch.

If it was not for the donations made to WHRC we could not have helped Beno and Beyonce the way we did.

With Gratitude,

Wild Horse Rescue Center

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Dear Supporter, 

As you might have gathered, here at the Wild Horse Rescue Centre we just can't turn any animals away. We currently have 59 rescued horses, mules and burros. That is a lot of animals who all need a lot of love, care, attention and food!

Our ultimate goal is to get the horses into tip-top shape so that they can eventually be adopted into permanent and loving homes. But, until the horses are ready we provide them with all of the things that they need to be rehabilitated.

We can spend as much as $3, 500 every six weeks providing basic care to the rescued animals. That includes veterinary bills, the farrier, training expenses and huge amounts of food- including bales and bales hay!

The rehabilitation process for these animals is good nutrition, quality veterinarian care, grooming, physical and mental training and lots of love. Most of the animals that are brought to us have been rescued from a variety of abusive situations. They have suffered neglect in the form of starvation, health care and grooming. They have been abused by improper training techniques and have been abandoned, usually as a result of their owners not having the financial resources to care for them properly. 

This month, to help us ease the financial burden, your generous donations have helped us buy these beautiful creatures winter hay, which they absolutely love! 

Thank you for helping us keep these animals that we love so much well fed and cared for. We couldn't do it without you!

With Gratitude, 

The GVI Charitable Trust and the Wild Horse Rescue Centre

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Cloud
Cloud

Dear Supporter, 

This month we thought it would be a good idea to tell you some stories of the beneficiaries of your donations. I hope that you enjoy them!

Cloud is a wild horse who came into Wild Horse Rescue Centre (WHRC) in 2010 as a wild, abused mustang age 2. She was thin and afraid. After we gentled her she was adopted. The family who adopted her had to move out of state and asked us to take her back so she returned to WHRC at age 5, she was not saddle trained yet, so WHRC saddle trained her. She is one of our centres riding horses for our international program. She is super people friendly and such a beautiful example of the American Wild Horse with intelligence and endurance.

Romeo, Cloud and Ford are three of our mustangs who live with us permanently. Romeo came into the WHRC back in 2005 as a six year old stallion, starved and wild. His halter had grown into his face because it was put on as a two year old. The person had him for four years, but was still unable to handle him. Romeo is a spokesman for WHRC, he attends festivals and schools to teach people about these amazing horses.

Ford has been with us for 5 years and she was already tame, so she became a great teacher for those who had visited but were afraid, Ford’s gentle ways taught many volunteers that they could trust a horse. She rode many people in such a kind caring way, she is now retired due to age and the accompanying aliments, but we still care for her daily, just no more riding . So she is still able to touch the hearts and souls of people from around the world.

Sophie going for a ride on Kayottee. Kayottee is a rescued mustang, she came into WHRC as a two year old, with two other abused mustangs, who were not as lucky as she. One of them died peacefully under veterinary as she was too far gone to regain her health.  The other one had suffered too much abuse and as a result has become a sanctuary mustang because she is mentally unstable. But Kayotte made it! She has even been a show horse at Arabian Nights dinner theatre in Orlando Florida for a few years! When the show ended, Kayottee returned to us to be part of our international riding program.

Copen is one of our smaller four leggered friends. She is 15 years old and we consider her the Story Teller, she always go in the pens with the new horses and just sits or lays in there as if to tell them it will be ok......we adore her each and every day we have with her.

We hope that you enjoyed the stories of these animals and the incredible journeys that they have been on. It is thanks to your donations that they have been able to be rehabilitated and cared for. 

With Gratitude, 

Diane, Wild Horse Rescue Centre

Romeo, Cloud and Ford
Romeo, Cloud and Ford
Sophie and Kayottee
Sophie and Kayottee
Copen
Copen

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Organization Information

Action Change (Formerly GVI Trust)

Location: London - United Kingdom
Website:
Facebook: Facebook Page
Project Leader:
Tyrone Bennett
London, London United Kingdom
$19,830 raised of $26,000 goal
 
321 donations
$6,170 to go
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