Help Plant 533 Families out of Poverty in Uganda

by Trees for the Future
Help Plant 533 Families out of Poverty in Uganda
Help Plant 533 Families out of Poverty in Uganda
Help Plant 533 Families out of Poverty in Uganda
Help Plant 533 Families out of Poverty in Uganda
Help Plant 533 Families out of Poverty in Uganda
Help Plant 533 Families out of Poverty in Uganda
Help Plant 533 Families out of Poverty in Uganda
Help Plant 533 Families out of Poverty in Uganda
Help Plant 533 Families out of Poverty in Uganda
Help Plant 533 Families out of Poverty in Uganda
Help Plant 533 Families out of Poverty in Uganda
Help Plant 533 Families out of Poverty in Uganda
Dir of Programs Brandy Lellou talks with farmers
Dir of Programs Brandy Lellou talks with farmers

Farmers in Uganda continue to harvest vegetable crops, which are bountiful fruits of their labors during this season.  They optimize their crops with contour farming, helping farmers shape their land based on slope to ensure they’re getting the most use out of their land while optimizing water use. Farmers also take this time to plant more crops on their farms to fill in extra space, maximizing production.

The combination of timber trees, fruit trees and vegetable plants have created more of an “abundance” mindset rather than a “scarcity” mindset with our farmers.  With the Forest Garden, they have food for their family to eat and food to take to sell at market.

 In addition, we are more earth-friendly through our enterprise-wide transition into using biodegradable tree sacs. These sacs are used in tree nurseries and help seedlings grow strong before farmers plant them into their fields.  This transition is a major step towards a more sustainable planting future.

Work continues in Uganda but as the original project is fully funded, we’ve opted to close this Global Giving project at this time.  

Existing recurring gifts will be directed to our project still to be funded in Tanzania.

Thank you for your investment in this work!  Please take a look at our just released Impact Report in the provided link to learn more.


If you have any questions, please contact Michele Levy, Individual Donor Advisor at 301-565-0630 ext 203 or michele@trees.org.

Our team has boots on the ground
Our team has boots on the ground

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Programs Director Brandy Lellou talks with farmers
Programs Director Brandy Lellou talks with farmers

Farmers in Uganda have been busily harvesting vegetable crops, which are bountiful fruits of their labors during this season.  They have been optimizing their crops with contour farming, which helps farmers shape their land based on slope in order to make sure that they’re getting the most use out of their space and optimizing water use. Farmers have also been filling in any gaps on their farms that could be more smartly utilized, helping to maximize production on their lands.   

The combination of timber trees, fruit trees and vegetable plants have created more of an “abundance” mindset rather than a “scarcity” mindset with our farmers.  With the Forest Garden, they have food for their family and food to take to market.

In addition, we are able to be even more earth-friendly through a countrywide distribution of biodegradable bags. These bags are used for tree nurseries and help seedlings grow strong before they are planted by farmers in their fields.  This bag biodegradable bag distribution is a major step towards a more sustainable planting future, and it was completed since our last update to you. 

Thank you for your support!

Our team has boots on the ground
Our team has boots on the ground
Preparing to take crops to market
Preparing to take crops to market

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Field optimization with papayas and vegetables
Field optimization with papayas and vegetables
Farmers in Uganda have been bust preparing their nurseries and planting their trees. In this most recent rainy season in March, farmers were taking great care of their nurseries to ensure the best survival rate for their young trees. During this time, farmers had nurseries of fruit and timber trees. Each tree in their nurseries has a purpose that will serve the family at home, or be able to be sold at market. Fruit trees provide delicious and nutritious food for families. The fruit tree varieties, such as citrus, mango, papaya, and avocado, are consumed at home, made into value-added products such as dried fruits, and also sold at market. The timber trees, such as albizia species, provide wood for home building, poles, and furniture crafting. Timber trees they are growing now will help them meet their household timber needs into the future and be a valuable financial asset as time goes on. 
When it comes time to out plant their young trees, farmers take great care to optimize the spacing of their trees on their land and make sure they have filled in any gaps on their farms that could otherwise be more smartly utilized. Trees for the Future technicians provide training and on-going guidance during this process so that farmers can make the most of their space and understand why planting trees in certain ways can be beneficial. For example, farmers consider the contour of their lands, so that when they plant, trees that need more water, such as citrus, are situated at the down slope of the land. That way, when water runs across the farm, the trees at the bottom of the slope can receive the most water. This helps certain trees get more water, but it also helps control erosion across the field. As farmers are now in the third year of the project, these techniques are increasingly important to ensure the sustainability of the land into the future.
Thank you for your support!
Ibrahima, TREES tech conducted recent trainings
Ibrahima, TREES tech conducted recent trainings
Farmers discuss their plans for out-planting
Farmers discuss their plans for out-planting
Timber trees help provide for the family
Timber trees help provide for the family

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We are less than $60 dollars away from our original goal!  THANK YOU!

Currently, TREES team members are conducting sample surveys as part of our annual monitoring and evaluation system. A sample size is selected for a 95% (+/-5%) confidence level. Using ArcGIS, families are randomly selected from each project for an in-depth survey (in four areas):
1) General demographics: family size, age, education levels, gender
2) Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) Household Dietary Diversity Score (HDDS) with helps us determine how forest gardens are impacting the dietary and nutritional improvements of each family.
3) FAO Household Food Insecurity Access Scale Survey (HFIAS) which helps us gauge each families access to food.
4) Household resilience reflecting a family’s increased economic resilience.

Rainy season is upon us in Uganda.  Next month, the timber seedlings such as Grevellia robusta, Maesopsis eminii, Albizia Chinesis and African Mahogany will be planted.

To date, our Lira project farmers have planted a variety of 1,178, 892 trees and our Kole participants 1,195,129 in their Forest Gardens.

Thank you for your investment in the lives of these farmers in Uganda.  If you have any additional questions about this work, please feel free to reach out to us.  

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In September and October, our farmer participants in the Lira and Kole projects outplanted more than 88,000 seedlings consisting of several agroforestry species in living fences around their Forest Garden plots, including Leucaena leucocephala, Jatropha curcas, Moringa oleifera and Calliandra calothyrsus. They also planted an improved variety of banana suckers which will produce much more quickly than the locally-grown banana.

A vital part of our program is field school training.  Farmers were trained in October on how to create and maintain a timber nursery.  As part of the nursery, they received timber tree species such as Grevellia robusta, Maesopsis eminii, Albizia Chinesis and African Mahogany. The timber seedlings will be outplanted during the next rainy season in March of next year.

To date, our Lira project farmers have planted a variety of 1,130,230 trees and our Kole participants 1,152,957 in their Forest Gardens.

Thank you for your investment in the lives of these farmers in Uganda.  Please consider renewing your commitment to this work to complete this targeted project.

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Organization Information

Trees for the Future

Location: Silver Spring, Maryland - USA
Website:
Project Leader:
Kendall Swenson
Silver Spring, Maryland United States

Funded Project!

Combined with other sources of funding, this project raised enough money to fund the outlined activities and is no longer accepting donations.
   

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