Provide medical care to Haiti

by International Medical Corps
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Provide medical care to Haiti
Provide medical care to Haiti
Provide medical care to Haiti
Provide medical care to Haiti
Provide medical care to Haiti
Provide medical care to Haiti
Provide medical care to Haiti
Provide medical care to Haiti
Provide medical care to Haiti
Provide medical care to Haiti
Provide medical care to Haiti
Provide medical care to Haiti
Provide medical care to Haiti
Provide medical care to Haiti
Provide medical care to Haiti
Provide medical care to Haiti
Provide medical care to Haiti
Provide medical care to Haiti
Provide medical care to Haiti
Provide medical care to Haiti
Provide medical care to Haiti
Provide medical care to Haiti
Provide medical care to Haiti
Provide medical care to Haiti
Provide medical care to Haiti
Provide medical care to Haiti
Provide medical care to Haiti
Provide medical care to Haiti
Provide medical care to Haiti
Mobile medical teams in Sandy aftermath.
Mobile medical teams in Sandy aftermath.

This month marked three years since Haiti’s 2010 earthquake—a day none of us will ever forget. It also marks International Medical Corps’ third year in Haiti, where we have been working uninterrupted, side by side with Haitians, since just 22 hours after the earthquake hit.

With your support, International Medical Corps has accomplished an enormous amount over the past three years. During the initial emergency response, we deployed more than 400 medical volunteers to provide critical care for hundreds of thousands of Haitians. Subsequently, we established a network of primary health care clinics in and around earthquake-affected areas and launched programs in mental health, nutrition, child protection, early childhood development, water and sanitation, disaster risk reduction, emergency medicine development, and cholera prevention and response.

International Medical Corps was one of the first responders to Haiti’s cholera outbreak in October 2010, rolling out a network of 10 cholera treatment centers that provided lifesaving cholera care for more than 33,215 cholera patients. We also ran an emergency medicine development program at Port-au-Prince's General Hospital that trained more than 300 Haitian physicians and nurses in nearly every component of emergency care delivery.  

In late October 2012, Hurricane Sandy wreaked further havoc on the fragile island nation, killing at least 54, leaving over 200,000 homeless, and causing extensive flooding and damage. Diarrheal disease, cholera and food insecurity have spiked as a result of Sandy. International Medical Corps responded by adding two additional mobile medical units (MMUs) in one of the hardest hit areas, Les Cayes, to provide cholera screenings, primary health screenings, health care services and hygiene promotion.

All this—three years of support for Haiti’s recovery—was made possible by you.

Today, we continue to help rebuild Haiti’s broken health infrastructure through robust training programs for local health professionals and technical assistance to the Ministry of Health, while providing cholera treatment and prevention services through MMUs in hard-to-reach remote communities in Southern Haiti. We are also working to rehabilitate the damaged Aquin District water supply system, restoring water for 94,000 vulnerable Haitians.  

So thank you for helping Haiti rebuild: one day at a time for three years running and still going strong.  

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We’re writing to update you on Haiti in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy, which has caused at least 51 deaths across the island nation so far. Late last week, the powerful storm ravaged Haiti, where 370,000 people still live in flimsy shelter and tent camps following the devastating 2010 earthquake. Eighty-four displacement camps were damaged, as were countless homes, businesses, roads and bridges

New outbreaks of cholera have been reported in Haiti, with more expected in the coming days. Extensive damage to agriculture, livestock and fisheries across the country has raised serious concerns about food insecurity and malnutrition—which will hit children under 2 years old and pregnant women hardest. Other critical needs—such as health, shelter and supplies—will persist for some time.

International Medical Corps has been working with local government agencies on the ground to coordinate the emergency response. We are adding additional mobile medical units (MMUs) in the most affected areas in the south and west, and expanding the coverage of our existing MMUs to respond to both primary health care needs and cholera outbreaks. We are also mobilizing to address the urgent needs of approximately 10,000 internally displaced persons staying in temporary shelters.

We will continue to update you on the situation in Haiti as well as our emergency response there.

Further, as the hurricane hits the U.S., we hope that you and your loved ones stay safe and healthy.

With many thanks for your support.

International Medical Corps has operated in Haiti since 2010 when our teams were on the ground treating patients within 22 hours of the earthquake. Following a comprehensive emergency response, we implemented long-term programs in Haiti including cholera treatment, primary health care, water and sanitation, and disaster preparedness. Today we are focused on training local health workers to help rebuild Haiti’s health infrastructure.

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Satellite Image of Hurricane Sandy
Satellite Image of Hurricane Sandy

Hurricane Sandy has been sweeping through the Caribbean causing extensive damage. We’re writing to let you know that International Medical Corps is mobilizing to respond in Haiti. 

Twenty one deaths have been reported so far and Haitian President Michel Martelly has declared a state of emergency. International Medical Corps’ Haiti teams are collaborating with local government and United Nations agencies to coordinate the emergency response. We're prepositioning emergency kits, fuel and flashlights at all of our sites. In addition, we have Mobile Medical Units on standby to assist in reaching affected communities.

Thousands of people still live in tent camps following Haiti’s 2010 earthquake and heavy flooding from the hurricane has only exacerbated their vulnerability. Roads are badly damaged, bridges have been swept away, and the main hospital in Les Cayes remains flooded. Heavy rains continue and the Gray River, located on the outskirts of Port-au-Prince, has overflowed—taking away homes and businesses. The main road linking Haiti to the Dominican Republic is also badly damaged, making it nearly impossible for vehicles to cross the border.

As crops throughout the country have been severely damaged, there are serious concerns about food insecurity, adding to the already precarious nutrition status of the population—particularly for children under 2 years old.

As a stakeholder in International Medical Corps’ Haiti relief efforts, we know that you are deeply concerned about the health, safety and wellbeing of Haitians. We will continue to update you as the situation progresses.

Many thanks for your continual support.

International Medical Corps has operated in Haiti since 2010 when our teams were on the ground treating patients within 22 hours of the earthquake. Following a comprehensive emergency response, we implemented long-term programs in Haiti including cholera treatment, primary health care, water and sanitation, and disaster preparedness. Today we are focused on training local health workers to help rebuild Haiti’s health infrastructure.

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When a 7.0 magnitude earthquake hit Haiti in January 2010, suffering in the Western Hemisphere’s poorest country was nothing new. With endemic poverty, stark inequalities and persistent violence, Haiti has long been termed a “fragile state.” But we know it for its strong people. And for people like you, who have shown unwavering generosity, compassion and humanity towards Haitians.   

International Medical Corps has worked in Haiti for over 2.5 years, since mobilizing our largest emergency response to date and arriving on the ground in less than 22 hours. At the peak of the crisis, our 408 medical volunteers saw as many as 1,000 patients a day, while at the same time training over 1,505 local health care providers, launching an innovative emergency medicine development program, and working side-by-side with Haitians to rebuild a decimated health care system. When cholera broke out in October 2010, we rolled out a network of 37 cholera treatment centers though 1,100 trained Haitian health workers, treating more than 39,700 cholera patients and educating over 2 million people on cholera prevention.

As International Medical Corps’ activities in Haiti have transitioned from emergency relief to long-term development, we have increasingly focused on addressing Haiti’s shortage of trained health workers and ongoing cholera epidemic. We are currently conducting continuing medical education sessions for local health workers and providing technical assistance to the Ministry of Health for cholera surveillance, control and prevention. We also provide cholera treatment and prevention services through mobile clinics in hard-to-reach communities, such as Les Cayes, in rural Southern Haiti.

In sum, our achievements over the past 2.5 years have been remarkable. All the while, your support has been invaluable. So thank you for being there every step of the way as we help Haiti rebuild and regain strength. 

Learn more about our work in Haiti and what your support has made possible. 

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We have exciting news we’d like to share with you!  Starting at 12:01 am EDT on June 13th, GlobalGiving will match online donations to our projects at 50%. 

This means that your gift will go 50% further to help families affected by tragedy overcome difficult obstacles for a happier, healthier future.

Consider giving again to Provide medical care to Haiti or see our many other projects helping devastated communities worldwide recover and rebuild.

And there is more.

The organization that raises the most funds on Bonus Day will receive an additional $1,000 from GlobalGiving.  And an additional $1,000 will be given to the organization with the most unique donors

There are $75,000 available in matching funds – we need you to act fast before they’re gone!  If you’ve been waiting for the right time to give, Wednesday is the day.  Please don’t hesitate.

Our lifesaving work is possible because of you.  Thank you in advance for your generosity. 

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Organization Information

International Medical Corps

Location: Los Angeles, CA - USA
Website:
Project Leader:
Davis Nordeen
Los Angeles, CA United States

Funded Project!

Combined with other sources of funding, this project raised enough money to fund the outlined activities and is no longer accepting donations.
   

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