Provide medical care to Haiti

by International Medical Corps
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Provide medical care to Haiti
Provide medical care to Haiti
Provide medical care to Haiti
Provide medical care to Haiti
Provide medical care to Haiti
Provide medical care to Haiti
Provide medical care to Haiti
Provide medical care to Haiti
Provide medical care to Haiti
Provide medical care to Haiti
Provide medical care to Haiti
Provide medical care to Haiti
Provide medical care to Haiti
Provide medical care to Haiti
Provide medical care to Haiti
Provide medical care to Haiti
Provide medical care to Haiti
Provide medical care to Haiti
Provide medical care to Haiti
Provide medical care to Haiti
Provide medical care to Haiti
Provide medical care to Haiti
Provide medical care to Haiti
Provide medical care to Haiti
Provide medical care to Haiti
Provide medical care to Haiti
Provide medical care to Haiti
Provide medical care to Haiti
Provide medical care to Haiti
International Medical Corps' Staff, Haiti 2011
International Medical Corps' Staff, Haiti 2011

Dear supporter,

As you know, while it’s impossible to prevent natural disasters, careful planning and preparation can greatly reduce their impact.  It’s the same reason that we practice fire drills in school: when there is an emergency, we know we’re ready. 

With hurricane season approaching, we’ve been partnering with the government, local doctors and nurses, and communities to ensure that they too will be ready.

Here are just a few ways in which we’re improving emergency response:

  • At the University Hospital in Port-au-Prince, we’re training 100 nurses and 50 doctors on Emergency Medicine.  The month-long course will prepare them to work in a hospital emergency department. 
  • Additionally, International Medical Corps has held disaster drills at the three district hospitals of Jacmel, Mirogoane, and Petit Goave.
  • Using a “train-the-trainer” curriculum, we’ve taught hundreds of first-responders on disaster response. These individuals have provided this training to others, helping to educate schools, churches, and communities on emergency response.
  • Cholera prevention is a crucial aspect of disaster preparedness in Haiti.  Our 7 cholera treatment centers have treated thousands of patients since the initial outbreak in 2010.  In addition, our trained community health volunteers are promoting key health education messages, including cholera prevention, within their own communities. 
  • In addition, we’ve carried out an Essential Trauma Care course in Jacmel to provide training for physicians and nurses. 

Our commitment to Haiti is long-term; we plan to help build a sustainable health system that can withstand myriad emergencies.  Your generosity has made our work possible – thank you.

All the best,

International Medical Corps

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IMC staff see patients in Petionville Camp
IMC staff see patients in Petionville Camp

We bumped along the road up the hill to Petionville to visit International Medical Corps’ clinic in the J/P tent camp, where about 50,000 Haitians now live since the earthquake destroyed their homes.  Their clinic is in one of the largest of such camps in Haiti, and specializes in primary care so they see a lot of cases of skin rashes, coughs, and stomach problems.  Another specialized hospital is also in the camp, where they refer more serious medical cases, like cholera.

 

The temporary shelter that IMC built is divided into a few smaller rooms.  On our left, over a dozen patients sat waiting for their check-up.  Children smiled and ran up and down the room while their parents waited to be seen by one of the two Haitian doctors working in the clinic.  Other medical staff took down the details of the patients waiting to be seen.

 

We sat down and spoke to Manuchecka Dajeantal, a pregnant woman who was in the IMC clinic for the first time.  She came with her husband, who was there to see a doctor about a rash on his neck.  She lives near the clinic, and the free care it provides means she can see a doctor about the unusual swelling she’s experiencing in her legs.  She says that if the clinic was not there she wouldn’t see a doctor at all.

 

The doctors at the IMC clinic also keep an eye out for psychological problems that their patients may be facing.  Because of the stigma associated with mental health issues, many people don’t seek care for problems like depression or PTSD, which many earthquake survivors are facing.  This is one of the few clinics specially equipped to deal with these issues, and mental health care is integrated into the primary care that the doctors are already providing.

 

After speaking with the doctors, we walked through the tent camp behind the IMC clinic where we met Leonie Joseph, a woman living in the camp with her husband and two children.  During the earthquake her house collapsed with everything in it.  Luckily her family, which included a three-year-old and a newborn baby, survived.  She is now looking for work and hoping to find a way out of the camp and into a home again.  She says shelter is her number one need.

 

Soon it started to rain, and everyone ran back under their tents.  We ran to our car and got in as the raindrops got larger.  Our car slipped and slid into the mud as we attempted to leave, eventually getting stuck in several inches of mud.  Over the next hour and a half the community came together to help us move the car and get to where we needed to go. 

 

Thank you for supporting International Medical Corps’ efforts in Haiti!

Manuchecka Dajeantal, 19, a patient at the clinic
Manuchecka Dajeantal, 19, a patient at the clinic
Leonie Joseph lives in the camp with her family
Leonie Joseph lives in the camp with her family
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Thank you for your support!
Thank you for your support!

1 year ago, a 7.0 earthquake struck Port-au-Prince.  An estimated 230,000 people lost their lives, thousands more were gravely injured, and a million others were displaced. Even before the earthquake, Haiti suffered from crushing poverty and a weak infrastructure. The country had now become a massive humanitarian crisis. For many Haitians, the past year has been a daily struggle to rebuild their lives.

The pain of the Haitian people should not be diminished but looking back, we believe we have been able to ease some of their suffering. With the help of our amazing supporters, over the last 12 months we have:

•    Conducted more than 156,600 patient consultations.
•    Established 13 clinics and 7 cholera treatment centers.
•    Distributed $16.2M in medicines, supplies, services and equipment donated by our in-kind partners.
•    Screened more than 20,000 children for malnutrition.
•    Trained and employed 1,300 Haitian health care workers and community mobilizers.
•    Treated more than 7,500 patients in our cholera treatment centers.


To read our 1-year accountability report, please click here.


Right now, we are looking toward the future in Haiti. Working hand in hand with the people of Haiti, we’ve expanded our health care services to reach those in need, while implementing critical medical training and education programs. These programs will help Haiti meet its own health care needs in the future, as well as help the Haitian people prepare for future disasters.

Please take a moment to watch all we've accomplished together in 2010.

The 2010 earthquake was an unprecedented disaster that will undoubtedly affect Haiti for years to come. Although the recovery process will be long, we are committed to improving quality of life, fostering self-reliance, and bringing hope to the Haitian people.

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A cholera outbreak has struck Central Haiti, causing more than 130 deaths and sickening at least 1,500 others. International Medical Corps teams here in Haiti have already responded with medical supplies to the cholera-affected areas, and are pre-positioning supplies in other areas in the event the outbreak spreads. As the only member of the UN emergency response team, International Medical Corps is ready to deploy a full Emergency Response team with doctors and nurses to the area within 24 hours, if needed.

“International Medical Corps is extremely concerned at the speed in which this outbreak spread,” says Dr. Jojo Cangao, International Medical Corps' medical director in Haiti. “We have already begun community outreach and prepositioning of supplies in the camps in which we work in Port-au-Prince in case the outbreak moves south.” More than one million people have been living in displacement camps since the January 12 earthquake, which killed more than 300,000.

There are already reports of the outbreak moving south, closer to Port-au-Prince, and International Medical Corps is pre-positioning supplies for orphanages in this area. Supplies, such as IV saline solution, water purification tablets, and oral rehydration salts, are being collected to dispatch to Artibonite if needed and to preposition in camps where International Medical Corps runs clinics. International Medical Corps is also coordinating with partners in camps where it has clinics to begin community education campaigns on cholera prevention, identification, and treatment - and clinic staff are being trained in cholera treatment and management.

“We are prepared to support the emergency response to the cholera outbreak however is most needed, whether through medical personnel, supplies, or both,” says Dr. Cangao.

International Medical Corps has extensive experience in cholera outbreak response, management, and prevention, with its most recent responses in Zimbabwe, Mozambique, and Iraq. Clean water, sanitation, and hygiene are also one of its top organizational priorities, with such programs in countries including Haiti, Somalia, Kenya, and the Democratic Republic of Congo. 

Thank you so much for your continuing support -- we are able to respond to emergencies like this because of your wonderful generosity. 

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It’s hard to believe that it’s only been five months since I became International Medical Corps’ Medical Director in Haiti. Looking back, I am really proud of the number of people we reached and the level of medical care we provided - especially when so many were at their most vulnerable to diseases like malaria, dengue and typhoid fever. To date, there has been no outbreak of disease in Haiti following the earthquake, even with 1.5 million people displaced. Through our 13 mobile clinics throughout the quake-affected regions, International Medical Corps was able to quickly deliver health care services, critical medicines and protect those who lost everything.

We not only successfully cared for people’s physical wounds, but their emotional wounds as well by making mental health care services available to quake-affected Haitians. Mental health care scarcely existed in Haiti before the earthquake and now, because of the training we have provided, our doctors and nurses are able to identify, handle, and if necessary, refer mental health cases for advanced care. In fact, some of our doctors are now going to be certified by the Ministry of Health as providers of mental health care!

Although we’ve made a lot of progress in Haiti, we definitely have some challenges coming our way, namely with the current hurricane season, which could cause larger displacement and even more health problems for an already vulnerable population. Flooding always poses a threat to health, as waterborne diseases become more prominent. With this risk, we have been prioritizing disease surveillance in the areas where we work and contributing to a national system so that outbreaks are tracked and responded to effectively. As our primary health clinics are a vital prevention mechanism, as well as a platform to track outbreaks of diseases, we’ve been working with the government, other international NGOs, and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on a disease surveillance system through our primary health clinics.

In addition, we are also rolling out our disaster response and preparedness program in Petit Goave and Jacmel, two disaster-prone areas in southern Haiti. Through this program we will train Ministry of Health staff and local communities in emergency preparedness and response, including first-responder training for health professionals. Our biggest challenge will be making sure that we are building an effective health care system that improves upon what t existed previously in Haiti. Even before the earthquake, only 47% of Haitians had access to health care. Seeing the progress made so far though, I believe we can create a health care system that serves all Haitians and I’m excited to be part of the rebuilding process.

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Organization Information

International Medical Corps

Location: Los Angeles, CA - USA
Website:
Project Leader:
Davis Nordeen
Los Angeles, CA United States

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Combined with other sources of funding, this project raised enough money to fund the outlined activities and is no longer accepting donations.
   

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