Feed 106 horses

by HORSES OF TIR NA NOG
Feed 106 horses
Feed 106 horses
Feed 106 horses
Feed 106 horses
Feed 106 horses
Feed 106 horses
Feed 106 horses
Feed 106 horses
Feed 106 horses
Feed 106 horses
Feed 106 horses
Feed 106 horses
Feed 106 horses
Feed 106 horses
Rocky, our newest resident
Rocky, our newest resident

We are so grateful for your support that allows us to feed the 106 equines in our care. We were recently approached by a local foundation, the Remiatte Foundation, that supports what we do to care for horses. Another rescue that the Remiatte Foundation also supports had rescued two horses in August. While the younger mare found an adoptive home, a twenty-two-year-old gelding was in need of a sanctuary placement. They asked us to help.

We were told that Rocky lived with the same family for twenty years. He traveled all over the west coast and Arizona on trail rides. In spite of two decades as part of the family, he was emaciated when he was rescued in August. While he still has a lot of weight to regain, he has a strong appetite. The arrival of fall temperatures will make weight gain more challenging but we are blanketing him to keep him from burning important calories keeping warm. We want all of his calories going to weight gain.

We suspect Rocky has developed pastern arthritis in his right rear leg. We also suspect that he might have Equine Odontoclastic Tooth Resorption and Hypercementosis, also known as EOTRH. As the disease progresses, the roots of the incisors (and sometimes canines) start to resorb, or basically dissolve. Several of his incisors are very loose. Fortunately, he is eating well now. In November Dr. Harlan, our veterinarian woth East County Large Animal Practice, will x-ray his legs and likely begin extracting the impacted teeth.

It is a very difficult time for us to add an additional horse to the ranch. Feed prices are unprecedented. Each new resident represents a life-long commitment. We wish his family of twenty years had provided for him during his golden years. Since they were unable to, and the non-profit that rescued him couldn’t provide him with life-long care, we are grateful to YOU for your support. Your generosity will allow us to transform this skinny fellow into the true beauty that he is. Every pound he gains will be the result of your support. Thank YOU for saving one more life!

Rocky is a friendly, curious horse
Rocky is a friendly, curious horse
Rocky is significantly underweight
Rocky is significantly underweight
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New mare in her 20's
New mare in her 20's

Earlier this summer the owner of two senior horses and a senior burro passed away, leaving no one to care for these equines. They were rescued by County of San Diego Department of Animal Services. Given their advanced ages, close bond and medical conditions, Animal Services asked us to provide them with a forever home.

The mare, in her 20’s, has a number of melanomas. These are common in grey horses. Our veterinarian also suspects she has an allergy to fly bites. We are addressing this with topical medication and a fly sheet.

The gelding, thought to be at least thirty is visually impaired. Our veterinarian believes he has lost most, if not all of the vision in his right eye. He has likely lost at least a portion of the vision in his left eye. This vision loss has greatly enhanced the bond between these two. The gelding appears dependent on the mare for comfort and confidence. Unfortunately, they require dramatically different diets so we have to keep them separated. The gelding’s teeth are worn out. He can no longer chew hay enough to derive nutrition from it, so he is on a soaked pellet diet. We hope that we will soon see him gaining weight.

The burro is thought to be about twenty-nine years old. He is settling into life with our senior burro group.

During this time of unprecedented feed costs, we were only able to offer these two senior horses and burro a forever because of your on-going, generous support. We are grateful to each of you for supporting our efforts to provide life-long care for senior equines rescued by Animal Services.

New gelding, thirty years old and blind
New gelding, thirty years old and blind
These two are very bonded.
These two are very bonded.
The newest addition to our Burro Brigade
The newest addition to our Burro Brigade
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Tootsie Roll when she arrived in October
Tootsie Roll when she arrived in October

In our last update we introduced you to four horses that arrived on October 16. Tootsie Roll and Lil' Girl, two sisters, arrived from San Bernadino County Animal Care and Control. They were part of a terrible neglect case. Tootsie Roll had been diagnosed with laminitis and Lil' Girl was said to have significant behavioral issues. Coco and Petey came to us from a neglect case with County of San Diego Department of Animal Services.

We are so happy to share that all four horses are doing well:

  • Tootsie Roll's feet have recovered well. Ex-rays showed thin soles and we discovered remnants of large abscesses that would have been painful when they first occurred. The therapeutic shoes put on while she was at the shelter helped provide critical support and she is now pain free.
  • We suspect that Lil's Girl's behavioral issues might have been the result of being stressed at the shelter. We have not seen her being aggressive toward people or her sister. In fact, these two girls are now sharing a corral and doing well together. 
  • Coco quickly gained weight at the ranch once we increased the number and size of her meals to amounts appropriate to a horse her size. This sweet, mellow girl definitely enjoys her meals. In fact, we have had to transition her from her weight-gain diet to a maintenance diet before she gained too much weight. As a result of arthritis, she is on daily pain medication which has significantly increased her comfort level.
  • Petey had the most weight to gain of all four horses. While cold winter temperatures often slow down weight gain, but thanks to his warm, waterproof blanket, Petey is looking much better these days. What we love the most is seeing him dance and prance each morning as we bring him his breakfast. He is one happy boy and the volunteers love him.

We are so grateful for your support of our Feed 1006 Horses Project. Feed prices are going up across all our feeds. We purchase our Bermuda hay by the half truck load. This month, the cost of that half load increased by $1,000! Your support is making such a critical difference in the lives of the horses and other ranch residents we care for. Thank you!

Lil' Girl when she arrived in October
Lil' Girl when she arrived in October
Petey when he arrived in October
Petey when he arrived in October
Lil' Girl and Tootsie Roll loving life.
Lil' Girl and Tootsie Roll loving life.
Coco kicking up her heals.
Coco kicking up her heals.
Petey showing of his new bod!
Petey showing of his new bod!
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Tootsie Roll
Tootsie Roll

On October 16, thanks to an amazing team of volunteers, we were able to help four horses in need through their Adoption Partnership with two counties, San Diego and San Bernardino.

Two mares, Tootsie Roll and Lil’ Girl were both rescued from severe neglect by San Bernardino County Animal Care and Control back in July. Tootsie Roll was diagnosed with laminitis so no one applied to adopt her. It was determined that Lil’ Girl’s behavioral issues made her unsuitable for adoption to the public.

Petey and Coco were part of an on-going County of San Diego Department of Animal Services neglect case. While both are significantly underweight, Petey is considered emaciated.

As we continue Tootsie Roll and Lil' Girl's recovery and begin the long recovery work for Petey and Coco we are feeding all four horses a lot of food, more than any other horses in our care. Thanks to your support of our Feed 106 Horses project, all four of these horses will have plenty of food to eat.

We look forward to featuring these four horses, fully rocovered in future reports. Thank you for making their new lives at the sanctuary possible.

Lil' Girl
Lil' Girl
Coco
Coco
Petey
Petey
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Cinnamon
Cinnamon

Since our last report, we have added two new equine residents to the ranch and. Your support of our “Feed 106 Horses” is a significant part of how we were able to say yes to both of these special horses in need of sanctuary.

Cinnamon arrived on May 27, but her story began in 2014 when a group of horses was living on a large property in Julian. Following a fire that burned the fences the horses began running lose on National Forrest land. A local woman was called in to help catch the horses.

The San Diego Humane Society took in two emaciated stallions and the woman who helped catch the horses adopted one of the mares, an American Saddlebred named Cinnamon. Now, seven years later the property the woman kept Cinnamon and her other rescue horses on was sold, leaving Cinnamon at risk.

We are honored to work with County of San Diego Department of Animal Services to offer this shy, twenty-year-old mare a forever home.

On May 13 Johnny arrived at the ranch. Johnny is a nineteen-year-old American Quarter Horse. He served as a U.S. Border Patrol agent for 12 years.

Johnny is described as an amazing field horse, but untrusting of people, because his prior owner was very heavy handed. He is very fearful of being tied. Border Patrol suspected he was often punished when tied, early in his life.

He will tie, but is nervous and has pulls back if he feels threatened. Border Patrol recognized this behavior early on in his career and were able to help him along and work around it. That says so much about the quality of care he received from U.S. Border Patrol!

Johnny has a bad tooth (#209). The tooth may require a very intrusive surgery. Currently Johnny is being treated with antibiotics and they are working well. But his nervous demeanor and tooth issue made it challenging to find an approved retirement placement for him. We are honored to be providing Johnny with the forever home he so richly deserves.

Please join us in welcoming Johnny and Cinnamon home! Your generosity is what allows us to provide a forever home for 106 equines. Thank you!

A dash of Cinnamon
A dash of Cinnamon
Johnny
Johnny
Johnny, U.S. Border Patrol, Retired
Johnny, U.S. Border Patrol, Retired
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Organization Information

HORSES OF TIR NA NOG

Location: San Diego, CA - USA
Website:
Facebook: Facebook Page
Twitter: @HorsesTirNaNog
Project Leader:
Amy-Pat Rigney
San Diego, CA United States
$36,283 raised of $50,000 goal
 
460 donations
$13,717 to go
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