Ethiopia: help for the drought affected

by Diakonie Katastrophenhilfe
Ethiopia:  help for the drought affected
Ethiopia:  help for the drought affected
Ethiopia:  help for the drought affected
Ethiopia:  help for the drought affected
Ethiopia:  help for the drought affected
Ethiopia:  help for the drought affected
Ethiopia:  help for the drought affected
Ethiopia:  help for the drought affected
APDA/Diakonie Katastrophenhilfe
APDA/Diakonie Katastrophenhilfe

The Eli Daar project region in Afar is affected by one of the worst desert locust invasions in the last 25 years. More and more people are losing their livelihoods and suffering from hunger. The locust swarms not only lead to crop losses, but also to the large-scale destruction of pasture land. Together with our partners, we are helping to mitigate the effects of the drought and establish food security for those affected

 

Together with partner organization APDA, the project aims to mitigate the impact of drought and locust invasion on the food security of families in Eli Daar. To ensure the survival of livestock, 2,916 households are provided with alfalfa hay. In addition, families will receive veterinary medicines and veterinarians will conduct six 15-day treatment campaigns. Beneficiary households have a maximum of 15 goats to ensure their survival. The hay is also expected to increase milk production by about 10 percent.
The provision of animal feed and medical treatment is expected to protect the lives of the herds and thus the livelihoods of more than 2,900 households and about 35,000 animals.

 

Thank you so much for your engagement!

 

Yours Michael tuerk

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APDA / Diakonie Katastrophenhilfe
APDA / Diakonie Katastrophenhilfe

The project region Eli Daar in Afar is affected by one of the worst desert locust invasions of the last 25 years. More and more people are losing their livelihoods and suffering from hunger. The swarms of locusts not only lead to crop losses, but also to the destruction of large areas of pasture land. Together with our partners, we are helping to alleviate the effects of the drought and to establish food security for those affected.

The speed with which the locusts spread and the size of the affected areas exceed the capacity of the authorities to control the swarms. In addition to the locusts, the population is already suffering from conflict-related displacements and droughts of recent years.

Catherine Mwangi, Director of our partner organization APDA in Kenya reported: "The locust invasion in our project area has a negative impact on the community's grazing land. The swarms have destroyed grazing land, which will severely reduce livestock productivity and thus lead to high food insecurity in many households. It is estimated that the first locust invasion in spring 2020 destroyed over 30% of the pasture land".

Another problem is the restrictions imposed by measures to prevent the spread of COVID-19. Transport and travel options have been restricted, fares have doubled, market days have been shortened and animal marketing to Djibouti has been suspended. This further complicates the economic situation of the Afar. On the other hand, food prices on the market are rising ever higher due to the coronavirus restrictions.

The supply of feed and means of locust control is intended to prevent the possible death of the animals and thus secure the livelihood of the livestock farmers. This can stop the spread of hunger. In addition, the migration to other areas and the conflicts that are partly caused by this will be stopped.

Be be with us and support this efforts with your donation.

Thank you so much,

Michael Tuerk

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Diakonie Katastrophenhilfe
Diakonie Katastrophenhilfe

The situation in East Ethiopia

The project region Eli Daar in Afar is affected by one of the worst desert locust invasions in the last 25 years. The speed with which the locusts spread and the size of the affected areas exceed the capacity of the authorities to bring the swarms under control.
The locust swarms in the Afar region not only lead to crop losses, but also to the large-scale destruction of pasture land in the districts of Andaba, Akkule, Aba'a and Wahan. Since these areas border on Eritrea, the affected communities cannot move to other areas. Many of the remaining livestock herds are already suffering from malnutrition, which is rapidly spreading animal diseases and causing livestock to die. As a result, more and more people are losing their livelihoods and suffering from hunger. In addition to locusts, the population is already suffering from the expulsions and droughts of recent years caused by the conflict.

How we help
Together with the partner organisation APDA, the project aims to alleviate the effects of the drought and locust invasion on the food security of families in Eli Daar. To ensure the survival of the livestock, 2,916 households are being supplied with alfalfa hay. In addition, the families receive veterinary medicines and veterinarians carry out six 15-day treatment campaigns. The beneficiary households have a maximum of 15 goats to ensure their survival. The hay is also expected to increase milk production by around 10 percent.
The provision of animal feed and medical treatment is intended to protect the lives of the herds and thus the livelihoods of over 2,900 households and some 35,000 animals.

What you can do

Please support our efforts to prevent a big desaster in Ethiopia by donation. Thank you so much,

Yours

Michael tuerk

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NFI-products ready for distribution
NFI-products ready for distribution

After months of drought in East Africa, the hoped-for rain finally came in early October. However, the heavy rainfall also led to mudslides and landslides in Ethiopia. Many roads and bridges had to be closed after brooks turned into torrents.
According to our partner RACIDA in the Somali region (Ethiopia), famine threatens if those affected do not receive support. The families lost their cattle and sparse crops (as did many of their homes) first through the drought and then through the floods. In addition, contaminated water and high mosquito populations favor many waterborne diseases such as malaria, dengue and respiratory infections.

According to information from the "Joint Humanitarian / Goverment assessment on flood affected communities" for Liban in Dollo Ado there is still a significant need for food, emergency accommodation, non-food items (mosquito nets, plastic sheeting, water containers), medicines and safe Drinking water as well as at sanitary facilities and hygiene measures to prevent WASH-related diseases.

Diakonie Katastrophenhilfe, together with the partner organization RACIDA, provides emergency aid for more than 10,000 flood victims. The goal is to reduce the spread of transmitted diseases in the flood-affected communities of Kebele and Dolo Ado. 1,747 received mosquito nets, plastic sheeting, water treatment tablets, soap and everyday necessities such as cookware. The beneficiaries are also informed about epidemics and hygiene practices. A total of 10,482 people will benefit from the project.

Please support our efforts in Ethiopia furthermore.

Yours

Michael Tuerk

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Endris Assen between his neighbours.
Endris Assen between his neighbours.

Endris, 25, is married and has one daughter. He lives with his family in one of the villages most affected by climate change. They do not own their own land, but lease it from older people in the village. Endris wants to improve his family's nutrition and strengthen their income by farming. But the profits are not enough, especially the heavy rains destroyed part of the harvest last year.
Endris has joined forces with 13 neighbours to run a climate field school funded by the project. There they try out various cultivation and irrigation methods and test new seeds for their resistance to drought. The group meets weekly and evaluates the weather and the condition of the seeds. They pass the data on to the district's local weather station for analysis. Based on the data, they want to better combat plant diseases and pests in the future. For example, the project has given them early germinating and frost-resistant wheat, which they are testing on several fields with different organic fertilisers and irrigation methods.
The work in the Climate Field School enables the men to identify their greatest challenges in adapting to climate change - and they are given various options for action. Because one thing is clear: only together can they secure their livelihoods.


The aim of our project, which has been running since 2010, is to strengthen people's resilience and their livelihoods. Over the years, around 4,600 families have been involved in the various project components. One component is aimed at the conservation of natural resources. This involves water protection measures that are being implemented on 100 hectares of municipal land. Water corners, terraces and planted ditches will be created, rainwater better collected and drinking water supply improved. "There is no perfect solution for the affected communities when it comes to adapting to climate change," says Carlos Huérfano - as project manager for Ethiopia at Diakonie Katastrophenhilfe, he has accompanied the project right from the start. "The aim is for the communities to come together and try out what works and what doesn't. What proves itself is then followed up."

As you see, sustainible changes are only possible with a long breath. Please support our work in Ethiopia - for a sustainible success.
Thank's a lot for your support

Yours

Michael Tuerk

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Diakonie Katastrophenhilfe

Project Leader:
Michael Tuerk
Corporate Fundraising Manager
Berlin, Germany
$5,244 raised of $10,000 goal
 
42 donations
$4,756 to go
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