Empower 400 Girls and Boys to be Leaders in Nepal

by Women LEAD
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Empower 400 Girls and Boys to be Leaders in Nepal
Empower 400 Girls and Boys to be Leaders in Nepal
Empower 400 Girls and Boys to be Leaders in Nepal
Empower 400 Girls and Boys to be Leaders in Nepal
Empower 400 Girls and Boys to be Leaders in Nepal
Empower 400 Girls and Boys to be Leaders in Nepal
Empower 400 Girls and Boys to be Leaders in Nepal
Empower 400 Girls and Boys to be Leaders in Nepal
Empower 400 Girls and Boys to be Leaders in Nepal
Empower 400 Girls and Boys to be Leaders in Nepal
Empower 400 Girls and Boys to be Leaders in Nepal
Empower 400 Girls and Boys to be Leaders in Nepal
Empower 400 Girls and Boys to be Leaders in Nepal

Project Report | Mar 12, 2018
Subina's Reflections on her Mentoring Journey

By Subina Pariyar | Fundraising Intern and 2017 YWPLI Fellow

Mentor, Subina (right) with her mentee, Manisha
Mentor, Subina (right) with her mentee, Manisha

Joining Women LEAD was like being part of a new family. This family gives you the guidance, emotional support and access to a network that enable you to achieve your personal and professional goals. It also inspires you to aim higher through the examples set by your peers. As in every family, you’ve got to help your younger sisters. That’s why I volunteered to mentor one of the thirty 2017 LEADers. On September 9th, 2017, on the orientation day, I was paired with Manisha, another young Dalit woman from the countryside. Being from the same background meant that I could understand her best and give Manisha the support she needs during the year-long LEAD Course.

Our shared ‘ta’ to ‘timi’ experience
The Nepali language reflects the caste-based hierarchy that exists in our society. There are multiple ways of addressing someone, using a more or less respectful term depending on someone’s status or caste. Both Manisha and I grew up being called ‘ta,’ the least respectful form of address, while our classmates were addressed as ‘timi.’ Discrimination in language is just the tip of the iceberg though. It has been a constant battle for us and our families to get to where we are today. Manisha, for example, has had to fight with her teacher to receive the certificate she deserved after passing her final exams near the top of her class. This certificate was needed to apply for a scholarship to study in a high school in Kathmandu, but nobody believed that a Dalit girl could succeed and therefore told her it was useless for her to apply.

Luckily we fought our way through and got a scholarship to study in Kathmandu. This hasn’t been the end of discrimination and we are still excluded from social events because of our caste. However, studying in the capital has earned us more respect back home in the village and people are now referring to us with ‘timi’. It’s a symbolic step, but it means a lot to us!

A role model to look up to
After I arrived in Kathmandu, I met Sarita P., a Dalit rights activist who became my informal mentor. I remember feeling overcome with joy and pride that someone as successful as Sarita paid attention to me: calling to check in on me, giving me advice and inviting me to important events. She was a source of inspiration for me, giving me hope that I could also succeed like her despite my caste.

I hope that I can be as good a guide and role model for Manisha as Sarita was for me. There are so few Dalit women in leadership positions that having a role model to look up to is an incredible opportunity for us.

Helping the community while helping each other
A concrete way that I supported Manisha was through opening the doors of my network to her to give her the opportunity to grow and succeed professionally. I invited Manisha to visit my university so that she could ask my professors the questions she had as she applies for different scholarships. I have also invited her to attend the National Dalit Youth Conference on Youth Engagement for Elimination of Caste-based Discrimination and Untouchability. The community leaders were happy that I was actively supporting Manisha which is indirectly helping the community as a whole.

After seeing Manisha give a speech at the School Leadership Program (SLP) graduation ceremony, I realized how much more confident she is today than the first time I met her. She has come so far already and I’m sure it won’t be long until it’s Manisha who is supporting her own mentees.

Mentors meet their mentees at Orientation Day
Mentors meet their mentees at Orientation Day
Subina and Manisha, Mentor/Mentee Christmas Party
Subina and Manisha, Mentor/Mentee Christmas Party
Manisha giving a speech at SLP Graduation Ceremony
Manisha giving a speech at SLP Graduation Ceremony
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Dec 12, 2017
Our 2017 LEADers: Role Models for Younger Students

By Camille Warambourg | Development Coordinator

Sep 1, 2017
Introducing the next generation of Nepali leaders

By Anukriti Kunuwar | Intern & 2016 LEAD Course participant

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Organization Information

Women LEAD

Location: Washington, DC - USA
Website:
Facebook: Facebook Page
Twitter: @womenleadnepal
Project Leader:
Dipasa Bista
Washington , DC United States
$8,449 raised of $10,000 goal
 
286 donations
$1,551 to go
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