Empower 103 Households for their Livelihoods

by Community Skills Development
Empower 103 Households for their Livelihoods
Empower 103 Households for their Livelihoods
Empower 103 Households for their Livelihoods
Empower 103 Households for their Livelihoods
Empower 103 Households for their Livelihoods
Empower 103 Households for their Livelihoods
Empower 103 Households for their Livelihoods
Empower 103 Households for their Livelihoods
Empower 103 Households for their Livelihoods
Empower 103 Households for their Livelihoods
Empower 103 Households for their Livelihoods
Empower 103 Households for their Livelihoods
Empower 103 Households for their Livelihoods
Empower 103 Households for their Livelihoods
Empower 103 Households for their Livelihoods
Empower 103 Households for their Livelihoods

                                                                                                                                                                           

                                                                                                               September 26, 2021

Eighth ID: 32851

Project Title:  Empower 103 households for their livelihoods

Absolute poverty;  the community of Yambio County of Western Equatoria State, South Sudan continues to depend heavily on agriculture, yet they practice shifting cultivation using rudimentary tools for subsistent purposes. There is no commercial agricultural practice on this very fertile land. Millions of South Sudanese suffer famine and malnutrition for lack of support and empowerment. The civil wars since 2013 created orphans and widows who make up for 30% of the population especially in Yambio. Most of the homes are child-headed or female-headed; therefore, there is acute hunger and children are malnourished. 

 

CSD has a food security programme to help the vulnerable women and orphans in Yambio to do farming and CSD uses her extension workers to educate the vulnerable groups on livelihoods and sustainable agriculture practices. Very sadly, Yambio community cannot mitigate the effects of the drastic climate change and it depends entirely on an insufficient seasonal rainfall and cannot grow crops for most part of the year. This is where the empowerment component is direly required; to provide irrigation equipment and provide agricultural seeds, tools and then extension services to these vulnerable to cultivate for their livelihoods.

 

The skills deficits and high rate of illiteracy could be attributed to decades of conflicts, which deprived the population opportunities to acquire vital entrepreneurial and livelihood skills needed to participate in the economy of South Sudan.

South Sudan faces one of the world's worst food security situations and endemic poverty with at least 80 percent of the population defined as income-poor and living on equivalent of less than US$1 per day (FAO 2018). South Sudan is the World’s first illiterate Country with the literacy rate at 27.0% (https://www.infoplease.com/world/country-statistics/lowest-literacy-rates).

Again, young females in South Sudan remain severely marginalized with lower education levels and fewer opportunities for work as compared to their male peers. Rural women and girls of reproductive age (13-49 years) have few or no assets at all and survive on less than $1 per day. This project is for the support of women empowerment.

Community Skills Development continues to provide extension service to the women Farmers, in the support for them to grow groundnuts, Maize, vegetables, keep poultry and small ruminants. The provision of extension service is a catalyst and motivation for the women to work harder. The women work as a team and teamwork helps the women to cultivate large fields than when as individuals. The single mothers supported by Community Skills Development have their lives changed to better- before the members used to have single meals a day and now they say they can eat two meals in a day. It is hoped that the women Farmers would continue to use the cultivation and planting skills taught to them to generate more food for their families.

Life history of a single mother

Community Skills Development majorly supports impoverished women in Yambio within Western Equatoria State. Women are at the fore front of our focused programming; to empower for economic activities, offer them chances to equal opportunities and representation. The total number of our target population is 17,000 Households in Western Equatoria state for various traits of business for resilience but this project only targets 103 households. Community Skills Development by means of this project provided women farmers with agricultural tools, seeds and extension services. CSD other projects provide scholarship to orphans, unaccompanied children and train women in tailoring skills, Beauty salons.

 

The single mother Esther speaks out in the two Clips saying

Esther 1; in the very beginning we were too blind and vulnerable. CSD came looking for us and Emma came and grouped us into a team. We formed a group for gardening of which we have gained much benefit. From the profit of growing the vegetables, we can purchase things that are missing in our homes. I used to make local pancakes – very unprofitable, now I can afford to purchase oil and wheat flour to make better cakes for sale that are profitable.

 

Esther 2: I have the Mini grinding Mill for Groundnuts that I have managed to buy with money from this program.  that is why we are very much grateful for the support CSD continues to offer to us! We are aware of your great concern for us and I am very sure that your support for us will even continue more. We have received great support through your great coordination and the work you render. Thank you very much

 

The cost of empowering women farmers each planting season totals to US$ 7,000 and there are two main seasons in a year in this region. If we receive more than that budget, we could then provide small ruminants to the women and purchase seeds.

We remain grateful and thanking you very much.

Ignatius Mborihenga

Director

Community Skills Development

Yambio, Western Equatoria State, South Sudan

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                                                                                                               May 26, 2021

Eighth ID: 32851

Project Title:  Empower 103 households for their livelihoods

The situation of South Sudan

Since independence on 9 July 2011, South Sudan remains one of the most under-developed countries in the world. South Sudan has a population of 9.6 million, the majority of whom are young with seventy-two percent below the age of thirty and 83 percent living in rural areas.

 

Ongoing conflicts have roots in competition over political power and are fueled by poverty, high unemployment, and absence of meaningful economic opportunities for the predominantly youthful population. Youth’s involvement in the civil war is not out of choice but due to lack of options. Youth destitution and lack of empowerment, underpinned by low level of education, limited skills, absence of productive capacities and income generation opportunities are among the principal factors likely to fuel more conflict. Some youth are involved in inter-community and intra-community (inter-clan) conflicts and cattle rustling.

 

According to UNDP update, South Sudan has 73% illiterate adults, majority of whom are women (84%), 75% of South Sudan population has no access to health services, 43% of the total population is severely food insecure and 1 of 7 women die giving birth. About South Sudan | UNDP in South Sudan

  

The youth are expected to be part of peace consolidation and contribute to economic growth of the country.  Labor-absorbing enterprises at the state levels are unable to utilize the local labor force due to lack of employable skills and skills mismatch. The skills deficits can be attributed to decades of conflict which deprived the population opportunities to acquire vital entrepreneurial and livelihood skills needed to participate in the economy of South Sudan today. Demand for livelihood skills far outstrips supply, leaving youth with limited employment opportunities. Skills mismatch and lack of employment opportunities are often two of the leading reasons for high youth unemployment. The skills mismatch includes lack of livelihood skills, vocational & entrepreneurial skills and lack of soft skills; such as communication, ethics, life and social skills (important to building a business network). Youth often not only lack the skills necessary to obtain a job, but their access to jobs is also limited due to limited or lack of access to financial services, land, markets and market information, and lack of social networks through which to facilitate business opportunities.

South Sudan faces one of the world's worst food security situations and endemic poverty with at least 80 percent of the population defined as income-poor and living on equivalent of less than US$1 per day (FAO 2018). South Sudan is the World’s first illiterate Country with the literacy rate at 27.0% (https://www.infoplease.com/world/country-statistics/lowest-literacy-rates).

Again, young females in South Sudan remain severely marginalized with lower education levels and fewer opportunities for work as compared to their male peers. Rural women and girls of reproductive age (13-49 years) have few or no assets and who survive on less than $1 per day.

In Western Equatoria and Yambio in particular, 90 percent of the workforces are involved in agriculture as source of livelihoods. Agriculture is the main source of livelihoods and therefore, support of vulnerable women to produce their food is indeed commendable options. Community Skills Development continue to support two groups of women farmers to grow vegetables by the provision of agricultural inputs and extension services.

In the last three months of March, April and May 2021, Community Skills Development has provided extension service to the women Farmers, in the support for them to grow ground nuts, Maize and vegetables. The provision of extension service is a catalyst and motivation for the women to work harder. The women work as a team and team work help the women to cultivate large fields than when left in isolation. The single mothers supported by Community have their lives changed to better- before the members used to have single meals a day and now they say they can eat two meals in a day. It is hoped that the women Farmers would continue to use the cultivation and planting skills taught to them to generate more food for their families.

Life history of a single mother

Community Skills Development majorly supports impoverished women in Yambio within Western Equatoria State. Women are at the fore front of our focused programming; to empower for economic activities, offer them chances to equal opportunities and representation. The total number of our target population is 17,000 Households in Western Equatoria state for various traits of business for resilience but this project only targets 103 households. Community Skills Development continues to provide women farmers with agricultural tools, seeds and extension services. Providing scholarship to orphans, unaccompanied children and train another group of women in tailoring skills. The tailoring group has now involved in the manufacture of Face Masks and so far 3106 have been produced and distributed. CSD has trained two groups of women farmers at Zambago and Tindoka. In the last three months of March, April and May 2021, our major support activity has been the provision of extension service. It is our hope to extend this support to the third group of women for farming in Nagori, South of Yambio Town; when we secure additional financial aid but we realize that the actual financial aid we now receive is far less to help the goal.

 

The single mother

The single mother Asunta only got marriage for a year with the first man and her husband divorced her. Asunta has 11 children with different men and none of the men who have given birth with her takes responsibility of the children and no man is willing to marry her either. Asunta is left with the whole responsibility of feeding and medically treating the 11 children but she is badly defeated in her entire effort to educate the children, therefore, none of her children is in school. The support she gains through farming can only feed the children and send none to school. You can see that these children are not nourished to their expectations, they need more food than they are provided with.

This family is a member of our CSD women farmers benefiting from the aid received through globlagiving. The strength of the women farmers group is a major reason why the 11 children have some food to eat and survive although the food isn’t sufficient enough; thanks to globalgiving and our esteemed donors.

Over the last three months from March to May 2021, we have been providing extension services to the women Farmers because this has been the planting period, orienting the women on team work, lobbying with community leaders to provide the women with land for cultivation, training the women farmers in areas of village saving (merit-go-round) and keeping the women farmers groups coordinated. The cost of empowering women farmers each planting season totals to US$ 7,000. If we receive more than that budget, we could then provide for replacement of broken tools, purchase seeds and supportive equipment.

We remain grateful and thanking you very much.

Ignatius Mborihenga

Director

Community Skills Development

Yambio, Gbudwe State South Sudan

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                                                                                                              January 25, 2021

Seventh ID: 32851

Project Title: Empower 103 households for their livelihoods

The chain of poverty;

Almost a decade after gaining its independence on 9 July 2011, South Sudan remains one of the most under-developed countries in the world. South Sudan has a population of 9.6 million, the majority of whom are young with seventy-two percent below the age of thirty and 83 percent living in rural areas.

 

Ongoing conflicts have roots in competition over political power and are fueled by poverty, high unemployment, and absence of meaningful economic opportunities for the predominantly youthful population. Youth’s involvement in the civil war is not out of choice but due to lack of options. Youth destitution and lack of empowerment, underpinned by low level of education, limited skills, absence of productive capacities and income generation opportunities are among the principal factors likely to fuel more conflict. Some youth are involved in inter-community and intra-community (inter-clan) conflicts and cattle rustling.

 

Moving forward, youth are expected to be part of peace consolidation and contribute to economic growth of the country. Labor-absorbing enterprises at the state levels are unable to utilize the local labor force due to lack of employable skills and skills mismatch. The skills deficits can be attributed to decades of conflict which deprived the population opportunities to acquire vital entrepreneurial and livelihood skills needed to participate in the economy of South Sudan today. Demand for livelihood skills far outstrips supply, leaving youth with limited employment opportunities. Skills mismatch and lack of employment opportunities are often two of the leading reasons for high youth unemployment. The skills mismatch includes lack of livelihood skills, vocational & entrepreneurial skills and lack of soft skills; such as communication, ethics, life and social skills (important to building a business network). Youth often not only lack the skills necessary to obtain a job, but their access to jobs is also limited due to limited or lack of access to financial services, land, markets and market information, and lack of social networks through which to facilitate business opportunities.

South Sudan faces one of the world's worst food security situations and endemic poverty with at least 80 percent of the population defined as income-poor and living on equivalent of less than US$1 per day (FAO 2018). South Sudan is the World’s first illiterate Country with the literacy rate at 27.0% (https://www.infoplease.com/world/country-statistics/lowest-literacy-rates).

Again, young females in South Sudan remain severely marginalized with lower education levels and fewer opportunities for work as compared to their male peers. Rural women and girls of reproductive age (13-49 years) have few or no assets and who survive of less than $1 per day.

In Western Equatoria and Yambio in particular, 90 percent of the workforces are involved in agriculture as source of livelihoods. Agriculture is the main source of livelihoods and therefore, support of vulnerable women to produce their food is indeed commendable options. Community Skills Development continue to support two groups of women farmers to grow vegetables by the provision of agricultural inputs and extension services.

Life history of an elderly widow

Community Skills Development majorly supports impoverished women in Yambio within Western Equatoria State. Women are at the fore front of our focused endeavors; to empower, offer them chances to equal opportunities and representation. The total number of our target population is 17,000 Households in Western Equatoria state for various traits of business for resilience. Community Skill Development continues to provide women farmers with agricultural tools, seeds and extension services. Providing scholarship to orphans, unaccompanied children and train another group of women in tailoring skills. The tailoring group has now involved in the manufacture of Face Masks and so far 2000 have been produced and distributed to government officials, health workers, public transfer drivers/riders, women association and women farmers. CSD has trained two groups of women farmers at Zambago and Tindoka. It is our hope to extend this support to the third group of women for farming in Nagori, South of Yambio Town; when we secure additional financial aid.

 

The Widow

In 2013 the lady Eva lost her husband due to civil war and left alone to care for her 7 orphans. In 2013 that she was widowed, she was still able to walk well and she would make fried cakes that the children would sale in the streets of Yambio. She was knocked by a motorcyclist when she was returning from the struggle to find food for her orphans. She is crippled and lame. This lady Eva is now living with her other niece who also has three children as a single mother and the total number of people at their homestead is 12 persons. This family is a member of our CSD women farmers benefiting from the aid received through globlagiving. The strength of the women farmers group is a major reason why the 12 household members still survive; thanks to globalgiving and our esteemed donors.

Over the last six months after May 2020, we are able only to provide extension services, purchased fuel to operate irrigation machine, conduct field visits and keep the women farmers groups coordinated. The cost of empowering women farmers each planting season totals to US$ 7,000. We do receive less than US$ 1,000 each season and we do live on the hope to achieve our goal this year 2021. We appreciate your support very much and thank you. Note that your contribution comes towards the support of very poor and vulnerable people who are being oriented and empowered to help themselves.

We remain grateful and thanking you very much.

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                                                                                                              September 28, 2020

Sixth ID: 32851

Project Title: Empower 103 households for their livelihoods

The chain of poverty;

South Sudan, having achieved its independence in 2011, is still struggling to economically support its populace. The conflicts South Sudan has undergone since December 2013 have again undermined the development gains achieved since independence, worsened the humanitarian situations; causing heavy costs on the population, livelihoods and economy. As a result, by 2018, 7.1 million persons needed emergency assistance. South Sudan faces one of the world's worst food security situations and endemic poverty with at least 80 percent of the population defined as income-poor and living on equivalent of less than US$1 per day (FAO 2018). South Sudan is the World’s first illiterate Country with the literacy rate at 27.0% (https://www.infoplease.com/world/country-statistics/lowest-literacy-rates).

Like most countries in Africa, the bulk of the population in South Sudan is comprised of youth (73.7% of population is below 30). Despite this useful and energetic age-group number, the potential of the youth however has not been harnessed to contribute towards the development of the country but instead has been and continue to be used to fuel conflict. Youth unemployment; estimated at 40 percent (UNDP, 2012) is on the rise as the prolonged war/conflict posed huge economic challenges in the country.

Youth destitution and lack of empowerment, especially the widespread absence of productive capacities and income generation opportunities, are among the principal factors sustaining the ongoing conflict in South Sudan. Young females in South Sudan remain severely marginalized with lower education levels and fewer opportunities for work as compared to their male peers. Rural women and girls of reproductive age (13-49 years) have few or no assets and who survive of less than $1.25 per day.

Of the employed youth, 85 percent of the workforces are involved in non-paying labour, mainly agriculture (up to 78%). This is because about 95 percent of the country's population depends on subsistence farming, fishing or herding to meet their food and income needs. A thriving agriculture sector therefore plays an essential role in addressing both youth unemployment and food insecurity in South Sudan. The potential for agriculture production in South Sudan and Yambio in particular is considerable. About 75 percent of the land area is suitable for agriculture while approximately 50 percent of the total 64.7 million hectares of land is suitable for cultivation. However, only four percent of this area is cultivated mostly by smallholder subsistence farmers (FAO 2015).

Provision of short and long-term employment opportunities for women heads of vulnerable households are increasingly becoming key to enhancing resilience and food security.

Single mothers have the desire to seek remedies to their poverty. Community Skills Development has organized and teamed the women into groups; a) Women Farmers b) Tailoring group.

Each group is engaged continuously in some sort of initiatives for empowerment and resilience.

 

Every single mother has her own special story to tell

Community Skills Development majorly supports impoverished women in Yambio within Western Equatoria State. Women are at the fore front of our focused endeavors; to empower, offer them chances to equal opportunities and representation. The total number of our target population is 17,000 Households in Western Equatoria state for various traits of business for resilience. Community Skill Development continues to provide women farmers with agricultural tools, seeds and extension services. Providing scholarship to orphans, unaccompanied children and train another group of women in tailoring skills. This tailoring group is now involved in the manufacture of Face Masks. CSD has trained two groups of women farmers at Zambago and Tindoka. It is our hope to extend this support to the third group of women for farming in Nagori, South of Yambio Town; when we secure additional financial aid.

 

Over the last three months after May 2020, we were able only to provide extension services, purchased fuel to operate irrigation machine, conduct field visits and kept the women farmers groups coordinated. The cost of empowering women farmers each planting season totals to US$ 7,000. We do receive less than US$ 1,000 each season and we do live on the hope to achieve our goal in the near future. We appreciate your support very much and thank you. Note that your contribution comes towards the support of very poor and vulnerable people who are being oriented and empowered to help themselves.

We remain grateful and thanking you very much.

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Project ID: 32851

Project Title: Empower 103 households for their livelihoods

The chain of poverty; the communities CSD serves in South Sudan depend heavily on agriculture, yet they practice shifting cultivation using rudimentary tools for subsistent purposes. Mechanized agriculture is the way forward to increase production. With the present practice, it is highly doubted if the population will be able to cross the line of absolute poverty to an average living condition. Majority 80% of the population cannot afford 2 meals per day.

 

Additional 400,000 of South Sudanese have lost their lives to civil war as from 2013; orphans and widows make up for the majority of the population. According to War Child Holland report “ more than 5 million children remain displaced, in need of humanitarian support, abuse, exploitation, neglect, profound distress and death.” https://www.warchildholland.org/south-sudan/

 

Most homes are headed by females and there is acute hunger and children are malnourished. The situation is even worsened by the effect of COVID-19. CSD keeps educating the civic population on sustainable agriculture practices. Very sadly again, community needs to learn how to mitigate the effects of drastic climate change other than depending entirely on the insufficient seasonal rainfall. We have to double effort and resources for the welfare of the desperate communities of Yambio.

 

Single mothers have the desire to seek remedies to their poverty. Community Skills Development has organized and teamed the women into groups; a) Women Farmers b) Tailoring group.

Each group is already engaged in some sort of initiative for orientation towards self-empowerment.

 

Every single mother has her own special story to tell

Community Skills Development majorly supports impoverished women. Women are at the fore front of our focused endeavors; to empower them, offer them chances to equal opportunities and representation. The total number of our target population is 17,000 Households for various services. Community Skill Development has provided some farmers with agricultural tools and seeds, fed malnourished children, sponsored orphans and trained bunches of women in tailoring skills. When needy women hear about community skills development, they come to express their interest to join the groups and we admit the neediest and the poorest of the poor.

 

In 2019, 60 single mothers were supported to do farming. We hope to expand the farming activities to support other vulnerable women, organize them for extension services and in teams.

 

When the women get into their groups, they begin to build and enjoy strong bond of social cohesion and mutual support. Arketa, one of the women farmers, had this to say that she got money enough to pay for medical treatment and bought meat for her children. That it takes her and her kids months before they can have the chance to some kind of balance diet.

 

The step taken to empower 103 households of single mothers for their livelihoods is only possible because of the support of distinct persons who provided the funds. This time, we were able to purchase vegetable seeds, ground nuts, maize seeds and fuel to operate irrigation machine. The cost of empowering women farmers each farming season totals to US$ 7,000 however we do receive less than a thousand Dollars. In truth, our efforts are being minimally boosted and how we wish we gained women support to help their sisters in this region.

Out of the three categories of women groups we set to support; tailors, Farmers, and Hair dressers, only the women Farmers have the chance to the support. It is our desire this time round to lay much effort and resources on the tailoring group; to train them and provide them with knitting machines and materials. We will prepare them for entrepreneurship and equip them for their livelihoods.

We remain grateful and thanking you very much.

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Organization Information

Community Skills Development

Location: Gbudwe - South Sudan
Website:
Facebook: Facebook Page
Project Leader:
Mborihenga Ignatius
Yambio, Yambio South Sudan
$13,743 raised of $76,650 goal
 
131 donations
$62,907 to go
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