Education  India Project #32565

Education Helps to Save Wild Tigers

by Tigers4Ever
Play Video
Education Helps to Save Wild Tigers
Education Helps to Save Wild Tigers
Education Helps to Save Wild Tigers
Education Helps to Save Wild Tigers
Education Helps to Save Wild Tigers
Education Helps to Save Wild Tigers
Education Helps to Save Wild Tigers
Education Helps to Save Wild Tigers
Education Helps to Save Wild Tigers
Education Helps to Save Wild Tigers
Education Helps to Save Wild Tigers
Education Helps to Save Wild Tigers
Education Helps to Save Wild Tigers
Children of Bandhavgarh with our Education Packs
Children of Bandhavgarh with our Education Packs

Over the last year we’ve faced some of the biggest challenges of our lives. No matter where we live or work we’ve all felt the impact of COVID19, some more than others admittedly, but the pandemic nature of this disease has truly had global impacts beyond what we could have imagined a few years ago. Throughout this time, we have been amazed and truly grateful for your help, we definitely couldn’t have kept wild tigers safe without your help. Now, as the vaccination programme continues, families all over the world hope for some kind of normality to return. We have no real idea what the new normal will be, and in some cases, no idea when this may begin, but we all cling onto the hope that there will be a safe, healthy new normal soon.

Those of you who have young children will no doubt appreciate the challenges of home schooling coupled with home working whilst fighting for space have brought, but in rural India many people have faced even bigger challenges with no work and the schools closed since 25 March 2020. For thousands of young children, this has meant no schooling at all; these children don’t have access to either a computer or mobile phone so remote learning is not an option for them. These are the children which Tigers4Ever usually tries to help. When we give these children books and basic writing materials we give them hope, we give them a chance to go to school which otherwise they may not have. We want to tell you Sonali’s story, as an example of how COVID19 has impacted her dreams. Sonali is just an ordinary young girl living in one of the villages around Bandhavgarh Tiger Reserve, where many families don’t have electricity, computers or mobile phones. Her story could be the story of thousands of young children living with wild tigers and facing an uncertain future after missing a year of learning.

Sonali, is 12 years old now, before the COVID19 pandemic she attended the state school in a neighbouring village five miles from her home. Each day she would walk along the forest trails where wild animals including tigers and leopards roam, just to follow her dream of a different life. When she got her first education pack from Tigers4Ever, she had never been to school. Sonali’s parents are farmers with a small holding, but often lose up to 65% of their crops to deer, monkeys and other wild animals with a voracious appetite for the new shoots of grain crops and the seasonal fruit and vegetables grown. Recently, wild elephants destroyed 50% of their rice crops too, thus there is little hope of buying the school books and writing materials which Sonali and her siblings desperately need. Sonali really enjoyed going to school, she had learnt to count, to read and to write; she had started to dream. Like most young girls of her age, she changed her mind about what she wanted to do when she is older, but teacher, nurse and wildlife ranger were amongst her favourite ideas. To have any hope of doing any of these jobs, Sonali will need to complete her education; she already lost the first three years of schooling because her parents couldn’t afford to send her to school, now COVID19 has robbed Sonali of another year.

If children like Sonali, can’t return to school when they reopen (hopefully) in April 2021, it is likely that they will never return. We could then face a lost generation of young people who could have been future protectors of wild tigers but will be more likely to threaten the future existence of tigers in the wild due to the need for more space for crops to feed bigger families and more destruction of the vulnerable ecosystem which is the tigers’ forest home

Sonali’s parents don’t want a life of poverty and struggles for the daughter and her five siblings; they simply can’t find the funds to send their children to school. Each day starts at 5 a.m. for Sonali and her siblings right now, if there is enough food in the house they may have breakfast before going into the fields to remove the weeds which threaten the growth of the wheat crop, and to harvest some vegetables to eat and sell. Sonali is big enough now to carry the water urn so at 7 a.m. she walks to the river with her mother and sister to get the water they need for the day. Sonali will have to carry 5 litres (just over a gallon) of water for a mile every day or the family will go short. Sonali is learning to cook on the open fire outside her home, so she must also go into the forest to collect wood to burn so she can learn this life skill too. When Sonali is 14, her parents will try to get a dowry together so that Sonali can get married and have a family of her own. As Sonali plants seeds in the field for the next vegetable crop, she wonders if she will ever see her friends in the school again, let alone fulfil her dream of becoming a teacher, nurse or wildlife ranger. Night falls, and Sonali goes to sleep on the single bed which she shares with three of her siblings, tomorrow is another day and she needs to help her father build a new fence around the vegetable patch to try to stop the monkeys taking them all.

We want to help families like Sonali’s to ensure that the poorest children get a chance to complete their education too. So when this COVID19 nightmare ends we’ll be looking to fund scholarships at a new school in Bandhavgarh too, in the meantime, we’d still like to provide education packs for when the schools reopen too. If you’d like to be continually involved in supporting the education of rural children in Bandhavgarh like Sonali, you can start a monthly recurring donation from just £5 per month, which will make a huge difference in offering future education for them. The link to start a recurring donation is:  https://www.globalgiving.org/projects/education-saves-tigers/?show=recurring

Imagine the Difference

The sense of despair and uncertainty which has been brought about by COVID19 has to end sometime, hopefully soon. So it would be truly amazing if out of this despair we were able to give at least 100 children, like Sonali, a chance to return to school and learn the skills which they will need if they are to become tiger protectors, teachers, nurses or doctors in the future? You can make that happen too with a donation of £25 (US$34) we can send 5 children to schoolhttps://goto.gg/32565.

Remember: when we provide education packs and scholarships for children living with wild tigers we are reducing the risk of future tiger habitat destruction AND ensuring that these children have the opportunity to become future tiger protectors.

I would like to thank you for your generosity and support on behalf of the wild tigers, which we are keeping safe; on behalf of the children who we have previously helped to get an education (and their families who will have food because of this help); and on behalf of the wider tiger community in Bandhavgarh, which benefits from providing books and writing equipment for inclusion in the education packs which we distribute. Stay Safe in these challenging times.

Links:

Share on Twitter Share on Facebook
An education pack can make a huge difference
An education pack can make a huge difference

In the last seven months, families all over the world have faced new challenges due to COVID19, lockdown measures, home-schooling, etc. The list still seems endless as does the ongoing threat of this disease which has blighted every corner of the earth. In rural India these challenges have perhaps been more devastating than elsewhere as the people are already isolated, dependent on daily work being available to subsidise their subsistence existence and help their families to have a better future than they had.

In our last project newsletter we asked you to imagine the challenge of home schooling without a computer, without the internet, without even books or a desk where your children or grandchildren can work – did you have that thought in your mind? How did you cope? We suspect that the prospect was one which you wouldn’t want to face?

In rural India, around Bandhavgarh, families are faced with all of the above challenges and no work, no food, no electricity, no running water and everyone being locked down together in a single room for over seven months. Now that is unimaginable isn’t it? Sadly, it is a reality for the majority of families living around Bandhavgarh Tiger Reserve, and what is worse is that the schools in rural India have been closed for 7 months and have no plans to reopen yet! So you must be wondering why we are writing another appeal for educational resources when the children can’t even go to school. Let me share a real life experience of someone living in Bandhavgarh right now, with you:

Sandip is a 7th grade student in Manpur, a village several kilometres (miles) from his home in Ranccha village, Bandhavgarh. Sandip's mother Diya owns a sewing machine and makes clothes to sell to the people in her village so she can put food on the table for her family and send her children to school. Sandip’s father, Rajesh, was a farmer like his family had been for hundreds of years, but one day in 2019, whilst he was harvesting his sugar cane crop, Rajesh was bitten by a venomous snake and died in his field. Diya was left with 2 young children, Sandip and Durga. Durga is only 4 so still too young for school. Sandip, devastated by the loss of his father, wants to be a doctor so he needs his mother to sell clothes so he can go to school. Diya said “Since the lockdown, I can earn little or nothing. My usual customers have not been able to earn money and are therefore unable to spend any. I am finding it difficult to make ends meet – we are even falling short of food for Sandip and Durga. We are grateful for the food parcel which Tigers4Ever sent, but that is mostly gone now and I desperately want to sell clothes so that I can send Sandip to school when they reopen. I want him to study well, but we don’t have a computer or electricity so I hope that he will be able to go to the special classes in Tala where he can use a computer to continue his studies and learn to speak English too. I want Durga to go to school next year too; it would make me so happy to see my children learning new things. If Sandip can study well and become a doctor one day, this would fulfil his dream and my dream for him too”. Diya says that she has an empty purse but her heart is filled with ambition for her son and daughter too.

Parents like Diya have great hopes and ambitions for their children, they want them to have a better life than they have had, it is only natural really as most parents want this for their children, the world over, too.

We would like to help families like Diya’s to ensure that their children get a chance to complete their education too. So when this COVID19 nightmare ends we’ll be looking to fund scholarships at a new school in Bandhavgarh too, in the meantime, we’d still like to provide materials for the special classes too. If you’d like to be continually involved in supporting the education of rural children in Bandhavgarh like Sandip and Durga, you can start a monthly recurring donation for a small amount, which will make a huge difference in offering future education for them. The link to start a recurring donation is:  https://www.globalgiving.org/projects/education-saves-tigers/?show=recurring.  

Imagine the Difference

Cast your mind back to the beginning of this report, the sense of despair and uncertainty brought about by COVID19, sensations which sadly are all too familiar right now. So wouldn’t it be truly amazing if out of this despair we were able to give at least 30 children the chance to speak English, a skill which they will need if they are to become tiger protectors or doctors in the future? You could make that happen too.

Remember: when we provide education packs and scholarships for children living with wild tigers we are reducing the risk of future tiger habitat destruction AND ensuring that these children have the opportunity to become future tiger protectors.

I would like to thank you for your generosity and support on behalf of the wild tigers, which we are keeping safe; on behalf of the children who we have helped to get an education (and their families who will have food because of this help); and on behalf of the wider tiger community in Bandhavgarh, which benefits from providing books and writing equipment for inclusion in the education packs which we distribute. Stay Safe in these challenging times.

Village Life in Bandhavgarh
Village Life in Bandhavgarh

Links:

Share on Twitter Share on Facebook
Schooling with a Difference
Schooling with a Difference

Education Helps to Save Wild Tigers – New Challenges and Opportunities

In the last four months, families all over the world have faced new challenges due to COVID19, Lockdown measures, home-schooling, etc. The list seems potentially endless. In rural India these challenges have had a devastating impact too: just imagine for one moment the challenge of home schooling without a computer, without the internet, without even books or a desk where your children or grandchildren can work – do you have that thought in your mind? How would you cope? Now imagine for a moment that you have no work, no food, no electricity, no running water and everyone is locked down together in a single room for 4 months. It is almost unimaginable isn’t it? Well it is real, that is the challenge which the majority of families living around Bandhavgarh Tiger Reserve have faced since 25 March 2020, and what is worse is that the schools in India aren’t expected to reopen until November 2020 at the earliest! So why are you writing an appeal for educational resources when the children can’t even go to school, I hear you say?

Well the short answer is we can’t just sit back and do nothing. We are already into the fourth week of the monsoon rains, so families already facing some of the hardest times of their lives are now facing the added challenges of thunderstorms which frequently fell large trees, farmers in their fields being struck by lightning (at least 145 people have been killed by lightning in Northern India in the last 4 weeks alone), and the potential to be driven to despair by the continued threat of COVID19 and the extreme poverty it has caused. So we spoke to our friends at the Global Tiger Conservation Society (GTCS) and asked what could be done to help the children who effectively will lose 8 months of access to education as a minimum. GTCS has agreed to teach English to 30 children at a time, 6 days per week until the schools re-open; which is fantastic news, however, the children need some basic writing materials and English-Hindi dictionaries so they can attend the classes and learn. Tigers4Ever wants to help by providing education packs and dictionaries for at least 30 children but we need your help to raise £200 (US$260) to cover the cost of these.

How you can help:

Just £20/US$26 will provide basic writing materials and an English-Hindi dictionary for 3 children living with wild tigers so they can learn to read, write and speak English.

Whereas £100/US$130 will buy basic writing materials and an English-Hindi dictionary for 15 children (half a class) living with wild tigers so they can learn to read, write and speak English.

Donate now at: https://goto.gg/32565.

Future Scholarships

We still intend to fund scholarship places at a new school in Bandhavgarh, but these plans are on hold until we have raised sufficient funds and the uncertainty caused by the COVID19 lockdown measures has been removed. We plan to prioritise children who have been directly impacted by the death of a parent due to wild animal attacks for these scholarships in the hope of giving them future opportunities they would otherwise miss, but if we cannot raise new funds, this will be impossible too. We expect to be able to funding a scholarship for one child for a year for £72 (US$96), and hope to get up to 10 people to sponsor these children at £6 (US$8) per month to make this possible: https://www.globalgiving.org/projects/education-saves-tigers/?show=recurring.

Global Tiger Day/International Tiger Day

On Global Tiger Day – 29 July 2020 - We wanted to do something different to help raise awareness about the plight of the wild tiger and the multiple threats and challenges which they face. COVID19, however, scuppered our plans to hold a week long wildlife art exhibition around the day. A few weeks ago we were approached by the Publishers BadPressInk regarding a book “Sinister Sisterhood” which is being released on Global Tiger Day and the author, Jane Badrock, is keen to donate 50% of the book profits to help big cat conservation. We were delighted to hear this, and Jane even agreed to a special edition supporting Tigers4Ever which is available from Amazon in Kindle and Paperback format using this link: https://badpress.ink/2020/07/26/tigers4ever-org-giving-wild-tigers-a-wild-future/ every copy sold will help our quest to save wild tigers, so we asked Tigers4Ever Trustee Dr. Sean Axon to use his past experience of reviewing books and publications and provide a special review of the book for our supporters. This is what Sean had to say:

Sinister Sisterhood is a darkly-comic thriller about a group of female vigilantes seeking revenge on those who exploit wild animals or hunt them as trophies.

The lead character, Elle motivated by a chance conversation with her Aunt during a visit to India, decides to do something about “eliminating” the top 10 global trophy hunters. Under the guise of an employment agency, she assembles a crack team of female vigilantes each of whom has their own motivations and unique set of skills which they apply with great enthusiasm.

This is a fast-paced globetrotting adventure and the plot takes multiple twists and turns as we navigate the adventures and encounters of each of the Sinister Sisterhood as they pursue their adversaries. Without giving anything away, there are several macabre and laugh-out-loud moments throughout and whilst most rational people would not endorse the Sisterhood’s unique direct approach, many would empathise with their cause.

The book is distinctly tongue-in-cheek and reminded me of a cross between the Agatha Raisin Mysteries and Charlie’s Angels! That said, the book does deal with the serious underlying issue of animal exploitation and the threat posed by trophy hunters and criminal gangs to the very survival of endangered wild animals such as tigers. It also touches on people trafficking, modern slavery and the use of legitimate business as a front for criminal activities.

This would make a great gift for wild animal lovers, those who support conservation work or those who simply enjoy an easily readable thriller. I would recommend it as a great piece of escapism during these strange times.”

We hope that our supporters will enjoy the book too.

Imagine the Difference

Cast your mind back to the beginning of this report, the sense of despair and uncertainty brought about by COVID19, sensations which sadly are all too familiar right now. So wouldn’t it be truly amazing if out of this despair we were able to give at least 30 children the chance to speak English, a skill which they will need if they are to become tiger protectors in the future? You could make that happen too.

Remember: when we provide education packs for children living with wild tigers we are reducing the risk of future tiger habitat destruction AND ensuring that these children have the opportunity to become future tiger protectors.

I would like to thank you for your generosity and support on behalf of the wild tigers, which we are keeping safe; on behalf of the children who we have helped to get an education (and their families who will have food because of this help); and on behalf of the wider tiger community in Bandhavgarh, which benefits from providing books and writing equipment for inclusion in the education packs which we distribute. Stay Safe in these challenging times.

Global Tiger Day
Global Tiger Day

Links:

Share on Twitter Share on Facebook
An Indian family at home in tiger territory
An Indian family at home in tiger territory

In our January project report, we recalled how our efforts in 2019 had taken the number of children we have provided educational opportunities to up to 2200 across 25 different villages and this was thanks to your amazing support. In as little as three months, so much has changed: around the world people are living in lockdown due to the outbreak of COVID19 (coronavirus), and India is no exception. Right now, Indian families are confined to their homes and schools have closed down, people are in a total lockdown for 21 days, but the rural schools close even before that began.

We have no idea how long this situation will last, and in that respect we are no different from anyone else, but what we do know is that in rural India, these poor rural families will be crammed into a single room or at best two rooms, there will be no furniture to sit on for many, and those who have a bed or two will take it in turns to sleep there. Add to this, no running water and no electricity for the many and you may start to see how difficult life will be for the children of these families with no school, unable to go outside to play with friends, and nothing to occupy their minds.

We normally ask for help so we can provide education packs so these children have a chance to go to school, but now these education packs may well be their only chance to learn with or without school. Now more than ever, the basic learning books which we include in the packs for the youngest children which teach them the alphabet in Hindi and English along with how to count; could be vital to ensuring that a generation of young children living with wild tigers don’t miss out on education for life. With this in mind, and with your help, we’d like to put a greater emphasis on these basic educational resources and also bilingual dictionaries for the older children. We’d like to ensure that every child we help has access to learning in both Hindi and English at this difficult time, but we’d also like to give them the basic writing materials so that if and when the schools re-open these children can go to school too.

In the next couple of months, we’d like to provide educational resources for at least 250 children living with wild tigers, but we can’t do this without your help. We want the poorest children to learn to read, write and equally importantly learn about wildlife, nature and conservation. We want these children to have a chance to grow up and become protectors of wild tigers rather than have a lifestyle which is entirely dependent on encroachment or destruction of wild tiger habitat for survival. We want to ensure that these children don’t miss out on the opportunity to get an education which would enable them to have a better future too, but sadly since our last report we haven’t received the donations to facilitate this. So when you consider that for just £20/US$26 we could provide the educational resources to school 4 young children living with wild tigers: https://goto.gg/32565.

We had also hoped to be able to fund scholarship places at a new school in Bandhavgarh, but the uncertainty caused by COVID19 and a lack of funding have meant that we must put this plan on hold, for now. This is still something which we would like to do, but without donations it is impossible. If we cannot raise new funds, then another generation of young children will miss out on education and could, as a result of this, become future tiger poachers. If you want to help us to prevent this from happening: don’t delay donate £20/US$26 today and help us to send 4 children living with wild tigers to school: https://goto.gg/32565. It would only take donations from 63 of our followers today, and we could help at least 250 of these children, which would be truly amazing!

If all our supporters could do the same, maybe we’ll be able to break down some barriers for children living with wild tigers whose parents simply can’t afford to send them to school because the cost of basic writing materials is too high. We know that you don’t want to be the generation which has to tell your children and grandchildren that wild tigers are extinct because of a lack of education in the communities which lived around them: https://goto.gg/32565.

Remember: when we provide education packs for children living with wild tigers we are reducing the risk of future tiger habitat destruction AND ensuring that these children have the opportunity to become future tiger protectors.

I would like to thank you for your generosity and support on behalf of the wild tigers, which we are keeping safe; on behalf of the children who we have helped to get an education (and their families who have food because of this help); and on behalf of the wider tiger community in Bandhavgarh, which benefits from providing books and writing equipment for inclusion in the education packs which we distribute. Stay Safe in these challenging times.

Tiger walks down an empty road
Tiger walks down an empty road

Links:

Share on Twitter Share on Facebook
Children gather round for education packs
Children gather round for education packs

Happy New Year to all our supporters, we’re certainly hoping that 2020 will be a great year for wild tiger conservation, with your help.

In our October project report, we reminded you how some amazing help from our supporters had enabled us to help 180 children living with wild tigers in Bandhavgarh to go to school in 2019-20 because we were able to provide education packs with the basic writing materials and books needed to make this a reality. This took the total number of children we have helped since 2010 to 2200 across 25 different villages. With more than 70 villages around Bandhavgarh, we still have a lot of work to do.

People always ask me “How can providing education packs be considered wild tiger conservation”? They back up their questions with statements like “I want to help to save wild tigers, not children,” or “I want to donate to a project which will help wild tigers not send children to school!” I understand that on the face of it, it’s not unreasonable to not connect education packs with wild tiger conservation, but essentially it is a fundamental part of what we do. Imagine for a moment what would happen if a child in the developed world never went to school: he or she would reach adulthood without the ability to read or write, it is likely that they also would find difficulty in articulating conversation with their educated peers and potential employers, that is if indeed they had any employment options at all. Their prospects wouldn’t be good at all….

Now think about the same situation in rural India, the uneducated child who becomes an illiterate adult with little or no chance of securing a job. Add into the mix the fact that the youngster will possibly get married at 14 and soon after have a family to feed, as well as themselves! Where will they find the money and food to survive? In short they have a couple of options: it is likely that they will have been working in the fields of their parents’ farm since they were 4 or 5 years old so they’ll know about growing crops but the problem is where? If their parents didn’t have any land, it is more likely that they will have collected mahua flowers (for Indian alcohol) or Tendu leaves (for Indian tobacco) or firewood from a very young age in the very forests where tigers and leopards roam, if they haven’t been killed by a wild animal whilst undertaking these dangerous activities. They need to collect around 2000 flowers or 5000 Tendu leaves just to earn about 100 rupees (roughly £1.10/US$1.50); the wood which they cut down in the forests may be sold illegally but is most likely used to create fires for heating and cooking. You may think, well this is ok they have employment and something to eat and in part you’d be right, however, picking mahua flowers and Tendu leaves is seasonal and the collection period lasts for just a few weeks per year after that the income source dries up. Crop growing is also seasonal and requires the cutting down of trees and clearing of forest habitat to make space for crops to grow, if the youngster doesn’t have much money they won’t be able to buy seeds nor recover when their crops are eaten by marauding wildlife. In such cases, uneducated villages often turn to extreme measures to get the money needed to feed their families. These measures include: snaring herbivores to sell the meat, but this reduces the tigers’ prey base leading to increased human-tiger conflict when the tigers predate livestock instead of native prey; poisoning or snaring (poaching) tigers so that they can make some money from selling the tigers’ body parts and skins, and stop the predation of livestock from their village; selling information about the movement of wild tigers to poaching gangs or providing accommodation for poachers so that they can integrate in the village and not stand out when they move through the forest. So as you can see, a lack of education threatens both the life of wild tigers and their forest habitat https://goto.gg/32565.

Furthermore, we have observed that not only do educated children have better employment prospects; they marry later; have fewer children and thus reduce the future impact on the precious forest resources of the wild tigers’ habitat. So we can say we a good deal of confidence that providing education packs to send children to school does have a direct impact on wild tiger conservation.

It hardly seems like yesterday, but 3 months have elapsed since our last report and it’s now a worrying 7 months since we had sufficient funds to help the rural children from the poorest communities surrounding wild tigers to have the opportunities afforded to them by a proper education.  In 2020, we want to provide new beginnings for at least 250 children living with wild tigers, but we can’t do this without your help. We want the poorest children to go to school where they can learn to read, write and equally importantly learn about wildlife, nature and conservation. We want these children to have a chance to grow up and become protectors of wild tigers rather than have a lifestyle which is entirely dependent on encroachment or destruction of wild tiger habitat for survival. We had hoped to be able to fund some scholarship places at a new school where these rural children would have an opportunity to not just learn to read and write, but also to learn how to read and write in English as well as their native Hindi. This is still something which we would like to do, but without donations it is just a dream, an aspirational target. As we stand, all of the donations we have received for educational resources to date have been used to help the 2200 children we’ve helped already. If we cannot raise new funds, then another generation of young children will miss out on education and could become future tiger poachers. If you want to help us to stop this now, please donate £20/US$26 and help us to send 4 children living with wild tigers to school: https://goto.gg/32565. If 63 of our followers did this today, we could help at least 250 children this year, which would be amazing!

If all our supporters could do the same, maybe we’ll be able to break down some barriers for children living with wild tigers whose parents simply can’t afford to send them to school because the cost of basic writing materials is too high. We’d like to ensure that when we’re old and grey we can tell the next generation of children and grandchildren that there are still tigers in the wild and that because of education there will be wild tigers for many years to come: https://goto.gg/32565.

Don’t forget: when we provide education packs for children living with wild tigers we are reducing the risk of future tiger habitat destruction AND ensuring that these children have the opportunity to become future tiger protectors.

I would like to thank you for your generosity and support on behalf of the wild tigers, which we are keeping safe; on behalf of the children who we have helped to get an education (and their families who have food on their tables); and on behalf of the wider tiger community in Bandhavgarh, which benefits from providing books and writing equipment for inclusion in the education packs we distribute. Happy New Year.

Links:

Share on Twitter Share on Facebook
 

About Project Reports

Project Reports on GlobalGiving are posted directly to globalgiving.org by Project Leaders as they are completed, generally every 3-4 months. To protect the integrity of these documents, GlobalGiving does not alter them; therefore you may find some language or formatting issues.

If you donate to this project or have donated to this project, you will get an e-mail when this project posts a report. You can also subscribe for reports via e-mail without donating.

Get Reports via Email

We'll only email you new reports and updates about this project.

Organization Information

Tigers4Ever

Location: Warrington - United Kingdom
Website:
Facebook: Facebook Page
Twitter: @Tigers4Ever2010
Project Leader:
Corinne Taylor-Smith
Dr
Warrington, United Kingdom
$1,004 raised of $4,500 goal
 
19 donations
$3,496 to go
Donate Now
lock
Donating through GlobalGiving is safe, secure, and easy with many payment options to choose from. View other ways to donate

Tigers4Ever has earned this recognition on GlobalGiving:
Add Project to Favorites

Help raise money!

Support this important cause by creating a personalized fundraising page.

Start a Fundraiser

Learn more about GlobalGiving

Teenage Science Students
Vetting +
Due Diligence

Snorkeler
Our
Impact

Woman Holding a Gift Card
Give
Gift Cards

Young Girl with a Bicycle
GlobalGiving
Guarantee

Sign up for the GlobalGiving Newsletter

WARNING: Javascript is currently disabled or is not available in your browser. GlobalGiving makes extensive use of Javascript and will not function properly with Javascript disabled. Please enable Javascript and refresh this page.