Education/Arts Orphan, Disabled Children Cambodia

by Khmer Cultural Development Institute
Education/Arts Orphan, Disabled Children Cambodia
Education/Arts Orphan, Disabled Children Cambodia
Education/Arts Orphan, Disabled Children Cambodia
Education/Arts Orphan, Disabled Children Cambodia
Education/Arts Orphan, Disabled Children Cambodia
Education/Arts Orphan, Disabled Children Cambodia
Education/Arts Orphan, Disabled Children Cambodia
Education/Arts Orphan, Disabled Children Cambodia
Education/Arts Orphan, Disabled Children Cambodia
Education/Arts Orphan, Disabled Children Cambodia
Education/Arts Orphan, Disabled Children Cambodia
Education/Arts Orphan, Disabled Children Cambodia
Education/Arts Orphan, Disabled Children Cambodia
Education/Arts Orphan, Disabled Children Cambodia
Learning the Tro
Learning the Tro

Hello dear friends,

We would like to invite you all to participate in our two most important fundraising events. These are #Giving Tuesday on the 28th November and our Year End Campaign from 29th November to 31st December 2017.

It is because of your wonderful help each year, (indeed there are some of you who help each month), that our school is able to keep on running. 

Your precious help enables us to provide food, medical care, clothing, schooling, Braille for our blind students and traditional arts education to all our children resident at our school and to children from local villages too. Today special care centres are no longer considered by international NGOs as a priority and so children who have lost their parents, or who have been abused by their extended family are left by the wayside. Cambodian society is not ready to take care of children properly by fostering them. Blind children are completely forgotten both by the state and society and the traditional arts need help to survive more than ever.  Taking loving care of children in a small family-like centre like our school is for now the only solution. So please keep on helping us.

We would like you to know that Global Giving has visited our school twice now and that we have acquired Superstar status and Top-ranked organisation for the last two years running.

What is #Giving Tuesday?

This begins at 00:00:01 EST (Washington DC time) on 28th November 2017 and lasts nearly 24 hours until 23.59.59 (EST)

Firstlly and importantly, Your Donations will be matched by Global Giving, but also if we can raise more than twenty donors and $5,000 we will also be able to win a prize as well.  Because the campagin on Giving Tuesday is so short, only payments using Paypal and Credit/Debit card wil be accepted.

What is The End of Year Campaign?

This Campaign begins on the 29th November and lasts all the way until 31st December 2017 at 23.59:59 (EST). By raising more than forty donors we will be eligible for a prize too. In this campaign we aim for $10,000. You can participate in both campaigns, your donation will be considered seperately.

Donations for this latter campaign, can be made using Paypal, Credit/Debit Card, Apple Pay, Gift Cards, Transfer and Cheque (Cheques are best in before 20th December).

Please kindly donate for both Campaigns on this Project: Education/Arts Orphan, Disabled Children Cambodia - #16371

Why?  

Because, though the funds raised will go to all our school activities and all our children, if we try to raise funds on too many different projects, we won't be able to gather enough donors and funds to one single project, in order to be eligible for a prize at the end.

Thank you dear friends for your kind understanding, your thoughtfulness and the time you have taken to read this, and of course for all your help.

One of our beautiful children in the garden
One of our beautiful children in the garden

Links:


Attachments: Share on Twitter Share on Facebook
Living a full life despite illness
Living a full life despite illness

Dear Friends,

Before I begin I would like to thank all of you who have been so generously donating to our school.

Our school stays open and running thanks to individual donors. You are amazing people and have done so much for us. Thank you.

This report is about a hidden problem that we are facing and we would like to tell you all about it.

As we care for children who have very complicated and life-threatening illnesses, we have to provide them with proper medical care. These include correct drugs, Magnetic Resonancing (MR) and Cat scans for severe epilepsy for one young girl Srey Ka* and psychologial support and MR for her older sister who was sold into slavery by their father as a little girl and severely physically and emotionally abused. She was also kicked in the head by a cow leaving her in a coma without proper medical care while living in her former village before coming to our school.

We have some children who were born with HIV and their parents died of AIDS. They did not receive retroviral treatment until coming to our school, this means that their HIV levels became border-line with AIDS. People who have HIV although they can prolong their life and live relatively normally, can sometimes suffer from complications such as specific tumours, almost unique to HIV patients.

As you all probably remember, we have our little deaf and blind boy 'Da* who was put in an orphange at three months old and there neglected and abused until he came to our school and began a new life. He receives treatment for his hearing disability from the wonderful NGO "All Ears" in Phnom Penh. Gradually his life is being re-built, but he needs constant care and assistance to help him heal and also realise his full-potential.

Then we have our children who are blind. Mostly we can do eye-tests and give assistance locally, but one of them a young girl was so severely abused by her uncle that after being hit accross the face by a bamboo cane, she lost the sight of one eye. This eye must be constantly monitored in a proper eye hospital. Eventually her eye will have to be removed and a prosthesis put in place.

We live in Kampot Province. There is no Magnetic Resonancing, Cat scan, Pet or Tac. There is no medical assistance or expertise for severe epilepsy, no proper specialists in psychology or psychotherapy. There are no specialists for the deaf and no equipment as such. The nearest eye hospital is in Takeo Province. There are not even anti-rabic injections (Rabies is a problem in Kampot). For each child who becomes severely ill, or who has a life-threatening condition which needs regular treatment, for those who are deaf or have health or sight complications, we must take them to the capital city Phnom Penh 137 km away.

We do not own our own car. We must hire a taxi and share it with other passengers and then hire a motorbike taxi in Phnom Penh. Even if we did own our own car, the cost of petrol for a total of 274 km each time we take a child to the capital for treatment, is very high. 

We are very happy to take our children to receive proper treatment and we would not consider anything less for them, however this necessity requires extra budget support and it has now become really urgent.

If you would like to help or think someone you know would like to give support, then the 5th October is the perfect time to do so. We have set up a micro-project especially to deal with this urgent requirement: You can find it on "Save Lives Through Providing Transport" Project Number 29610. It is affiliated to this - our main project.  GlobalGiving will be matching funds on the 5th October, starting from 9.am Washington DC time and lasting until 11.59pm

If you can't find our micro-project, then it's fine to help our transport project and other needs on this project page (Education/Arts Orphan, Disabled Children #16371). If you didn't make it for the 5th October, no problem, our micro-project is running until the end of October.

Thank you all for your wonderful support!

(* With thanks to the photographer Steve Porte for all his lovely photos.

*To protect their privacy the names given are not our children's full names)

Art creates happiness and is healing
Art creates happiness and is healing

Links:

Share on Twitter Share on Facebook
Learning to dance again
Learning to dance again

Hello dear friends and supporters of our school,

Please join us for International Youth Week on GlobalGiving from 7th August starting 9am -Washington DC time until 12th August at 11.59.59pm.

This is such an important occasion for us, because for a limited time donations to our NGO will be matched 100% by GlobalGiving. So please celebrate the wonderful work our school does. 

In today's world small local organisations such as ours do not receive foreign government or large NGO funding. The world has changed and funding policies have changed also. This makes it so important for us that our project is supported by raising funds online and creating greater awareness of our work and what is happening in Cambodia. 

 

During International Youth Week we will have some key focus points:-

 

° Psychological, physical and emotional support for our children who have suffered severe abuse from their extended families

° Special medical care and transport  to hosptial and special centres in the capital Phnom Penh for our children who have complications due to level 3 HIV, severe epilepsy and deafness.

° Continued support for our program for our Blind children so that they can get a proper education. We raised almost a third of our goal on our recent micro-project fundraiser, but we still have two thirds to go.

° Support for our special arts education program: Which revives traditional performing arts and gives our children a chance to become professional artists and to benefirt from the therapeutic side of learning music, dance and theatre.

Cambodia is often misunderstood by the West as now being a lower-middle income country and so not in need of aid. The reality on the ground could not be more different. Although there is a very tiny percent of super-wealthy Cambodians, more than seventy-percent of the population live in rural areas. Too many people are dispossessed of their land, or their farming affected by climate change. Basic, essential medical care is lacking. Sometimes people die in agony from menangitis because a rural doctor has misdiagnosed the illness as a migraine. Tubercuolosis is drug resistent and endemic. HIV and AIDS is still too high and many parents abandon their children to elderly relatives so as to earn desperately needed money across the border in Thailand.

Cambodia has been pushed by large international NGOs to promote foster care especially amongst extended family members. In theory this is a good idea, because it avoids institutionalised care, which can sometimes be awful. This is based on the model used in the UK and the USA. However recently in the UK it was discovered that an alarmingly high number of children suffered abuse and neglect in foster homes and some were shifted about from home to home without ever settling down. The current reality in Cambodia does not yet support foster care. Although it would be wonderful if extended families or neighbours really loved and took care of orphaned children, this is not the case in many foster homes. Too many children are subjected to abuse, physical and sexual. Others are neglected and many are denied the chance to go to school and complete their education. Socially they are thought of as inferior and used as servants. 

In April we battled to complete all the Ministry of Social Affairs legal custody documents in time before the Khmer New Year. Why? Because a little girl given into our care must not go back to her extended family. One uncle hit her so hard accross the face with a bamboo stick that he blinded her in one eye for life. She was also sexually abused by another uncle. 

Another of our girls suffered a psychosis from post-traumatic stress because after her mother's death, her father sold her to a married couple, who beat her and neglected her. She now goes to a pscychologist and psychiatrist. 

Yet amongst all these tales of incredible suffering and bravery, our school has a beautiful arts program, which is so healing and positive. Our arts program on a larger scale restores back to Cambodia traditions which were thought lost after the Khmer Rouge genocide.

Imagine therefore the complexity of running such a school as ours. The wonderful Cambodian staff we have who try so hard. Of our children - those who live in our school and have so many needs, firstly as children and then physically if they are ill and because all children need caring for properly. Emotionally, because they are are all in need of love and attention and healing. Then the coordination of getting everyone to their academic lessons...our blind children with their Braille teacher, our littlest one to kindergarten, our slightly bigger ones to primary school, middle school and then lyceum. Then extra English lessons for everyone and computer courses for our blind children. Medical and specialist visits for some of our children. Clothing for everyone...the uniform for school, recreation clothes, ceremonial clothes for performances and pyjamas. Our performing arts course, traditional Pin peat and Mohori music, classical Cambodian ballet, folk dance, Yike theatre and making and rehearsing shadow puppetry. We don't just teach the children resident at our school, we also give free lessons to around a hundred children from very poor local villages. 

We also have programs that promote peace and inter-religious and cultural harmony. So we have done exchanges with Vietnam (former enemy of Cambodia). We have hosted and been hosted by Qatari high school students. Most especially we continue to do education and awareness about the Cambodian genocide from 1975-79. Because of government policy (some members of the government were themselves former Khmer Rouge soldiers), the younger generation of Cambodians doesn't know enough about the Khmer Rouge genocide. The trauma from the older generation who survived and the lack of interest by the youngest generation, combined with affectivity problems by the generation in the middle has created a social vacum. There are today severe problems of drugs and substance abuse amongst Cambodian youth, alcholism and gambling addictions across all generations and abandon and abuse of children by high numbers of parents because of post-genocide trauma. We have hosted photograph exhibitions about the U.S. carpet bombing of Cambodia and we have screened for free, films and documentaries about the Khmer Rouge genocide. These are normally visual materials that ordinary Cambodians have no access to. In this way we try and build bridges between the different generations and create understanding, healing and peace.

By supporting our school, you have helped and continue to help, this extraordinary richness of multiple projects. You have been helping so many children who vitally require assistance and you have supported the preservation of Cambodian culture. This latter considered World Intangible Cultural Heritage by UNESCO. International youth Week is therefore indeed a real celebration. In August we celebrate 23 years since the birth of our school in 1994.

Well done. You have helped so much!

Thank you everybody

 

*All Photographs of our students and staff were given with their permission and taken by Steve Porte.  We have not photographed those children whose personal difficult histories were described in this report. This is because we would like to protect their identity.

Our masters teach ancient Yike
Our masters teach ancient Yike
Drying feet wet with rain
Drying feet wet with rain
Looking at big brother doing his Braille homework
Looking at big brother doing his Braille homework

Links:

Share on Twitter Share on Facebook
Loak Kru Bem teaching the Skor Thom
Loak Kru Bem teaching the Skor Thom

Dear friends and supporters of our school,

I would like to thank you all for your kind support and especially to those who so generously donate to our school every month!

In this report I would like to bring your attention to our education project for our resident blind children. As you might know, blind children do not receive any support whatsoever from the state. The majority of Cambodia's population lives in rural areas, where there are no NGOs assisting the blind and where there is absolutely no access to to state education because there are no Braille teachers. There are actually very few NGOs assisting blind children in Cambodia and our school is currently the one one in Kampot and the whole of Southwestern Cambodia. 

Many children who are blind are considered a blight to their families and to society and so they are rejected and marginalised, insulted and sometimes abused and forced into begging.

We provide them with accomodation at our school, accompany them to their state school lessons, pay for their Braille teacher and provide vocational and therapeutic training in traditional Cambodian music - Pin Peat, Mohori and Yike. They also study English language and computer skills in the Khmer language.

We are now running a micro-project on Global Giving to specifically sponsor their Braille teacher at a cost of $1500 per academic year. We have only 30 days left to raise these funds and so far we have raised $150. If you would like to be a part of supporting our blind children's scholastic education program, please join us on the Global Giving micro-project "Help our blind children get an Education, Cambodia". Project number 27416. You can also find the direct link on our Facebook page.

Thank you all for your kind attention and valuable support!

Learning with Braille books
Learning with Braille books
Making Braille using metal instruments
Making Braille using metal instruments

Links:

Share on Twitter Share on Facebook
Teaching the drums to our blind and deaf boy
Teaching the drums to our blind and deaf boy

 Dear friends and supporters of our school,

Thank you so much for your incredibly generous participation of our Year-End Campaign. Your participation has been so important and has helped us enormously. In this project report, I would like to describe to you one of our programs which you have supported.

The Yike is an ancient art form, which originates from a fusion of the Khmer and the Chhampa Empires, dating back to around the fourteenth century. Today the descendants of the Kingdom of Champa are known as the Chham and probably were related to Malay people. Their religion is Islam and they are now a minority in Buddhist Cambodia.

Around nine hundred years ago, through the centre of what is now modern-day Cambodia there was the Kingdom of Chhampa. The Khmer kings of Angkor were often at war with the Kings of the Chham, but their close proximity meant an inevitable cultural exchange. Later the Kingdom of Chhampa was assimilated into Cambodia. The epic battles between the two kingdoms can be seen on the famous carvings and bas-reliefs of the temples of Angkor Wat. 

The art of Yike is very similar to the Chham people's music and dance, but Yike in it's original pure form is practiced by very few Cambodians and is an art which is in danger of dying out.

The Yike combines, music using the large Yike drum, song, dance and theatre. Many of the songs are ancient poems with words long-forgotten in Cambodia. Our school has the honour to have in residence for the last seventeen years, two of the last greatest Yike masters in Cambodia who are regarded as national treasures. Master Loak Kru Bèm and his wife Master Neark Kru Savorn* are from Chhouk District and their Yike troupe is famous.

Both of them survived the Khmer Rouge genocide and the war, because they were told to take care of the Khmer Rouge fisheries in high lakes far from the oppressive mass labour camps where the majority of Cambodians were rigidly controlled and executed. However they faced a lot of danger when the Khmer Rouge regime collapsed and Khmer Rouge leaders retreated to their mountain bases in Kampot. The district of Chhouk and neighbouring Chumkiri came under constant fire, guerilla warfare and attacks on the civilian population. The Khmer Rouge factions were in competition with one another and one faction decided to execute Loak Kru Bèm for being a Yike musician. In great fear, he decided to go and see the most powerful Khmer Rouge leader of the area, who dominated both factions, to ask for clemency. The leader in question hearing Loak Kru Bèm play, said that he could not see anything wrong with the music and that Loak Kru Bèm, his wife and family should be left in peace.

Not only do Loak Kru Bèm and Neark Kru Savorn teach Yike at our school for both our residential children and impoverished children from local villages, they are also devoted carers and counsellers to our children. Loak Kru Bèm takes great care of our large garden and both give so much more than is normally required of a teacher. They truly love our children and have profound concern for their welfare. They are sensitive and kind to our little blind and deaf boy, who loves playing the drums because he can feel the vibrations and they encourage him to experiment with the instruments and even to dance. Both masters have prepared special performances with our students and we have together won two national prizes in the capital Phnom Penh and recorded a CD.

You can watch them on our short film posted on our project page. You will understand what special people they are and how honoured and grateful we are to have them at our school. Because of your wonderful and generous help, we are able to support the Yike program and the great benefits it brings both to our children and to keeping alive the ancient, cultural heritage of Cambodia.

Thank you

 

* Loak Kru means Master (male)  Neark Kru means Master (female). We have not given their full names to protect their privacy.

Learning the Yike drums
Learning the Yike drums
Neark Kru and Loak Kru
Neark Kru and Loak Kru
Neark Kru Savorn teaching dance exercises
Neark Kru Savorn teaching dance exercises

Links:

Share on Twitter Share on Facebook
 

About Project Reports

Project Reports on GlobalGiving are posted directly to globalgiving.org by Project Leaders as they are completed, generally every 3-4 months. To protect the integrity of these documents, GlobalGiving does not alter them; therefore you may find some language or formatting issues.

If you donate to this project or have donated to this project, you will get an e-mail when this project posts a report. You can also subscribe for reports via e-mail without donating.

Get Reports via Email

We'll only email you new reports and updates about this project.

Organization Information

Khmer Cultural Development Institute

Location: Kampot Town, Kampot Province - Cambodia
Website:
Facebook: Facebook Page
Project Leader:
Catherine Geach
Founder
Kampot Town, Kampot Province Cambodia
$79,752 raised of $100,000 goal
 
819 donations
$20,248 to go
Donate Now
lock
Donating through GlobalGiving is safe, secure, and easy with many payment options to choose from. View other ways to donate

Khmer Cultural Development Institute has earned this recognition on GlobalGiving:
Add Project to Favorites

Help raise money!

Support this important cause by creating a personalized fundraising page.

Start a Fundraiser

Learn more about GlobalGiving

Teenage Science Students
Vetting +
Due Diligence

Snorkeler
Our
Impact

Woman Holding a Gift Card
Give
Gift Cards

Young Girl with a Bicycle
GlobalGiving
Guarantee

Sign up for the GlobalGiving Newsletter

WARNING: Javascript is currently disabled or is not available in your browser. GlobalGiving makes extensive use of Javascript and will not function properly with Javascript disabled. Please enable Javascript and refresh this page.