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Train new health workers in Ethiopia: Save lives!

by IntraHealth International
Train new health workers in Ethiopia: Save lives!
Train new health workers in Ethiopia: Save lives!
Train new health workers in Ethiopia: Save lives!
Train new health workers in Ethiopia: Save lives!
Train new health workers in Ethiopia: Save lives!
Train new health workers in Ethiopia: Save lives!
Train new health workers in Ethiopia: Save lives!
Train new health workers in Ethiopia: Save lives!
Train new health workers in Ethiopia: Save lives!
Train new health workers in Ethiopia: Save lives!
Train new health workers in Ethiopia: Save lives!
Train new health workers in Ethiopia: Save lives!
Train new health workers in Ethiopia: Save lives!
Train new health workers in Ethiopia: Save lives!

The nursing students at Alkan Health Science College began the third quarter of their second year this July and have continued pursuing their studies in areas of predetermined key competencies to improve the nursing skills they have already begun to develop. As we follow their studies, it is important to remember the impact these scholarships are having not just on the lives of these six students, but also in the communities they will serve.

Ethiopia is one of the most populated countries in Africa, second only to Nigeria. Providing healthcare to such a large and continuously growing population is especially challenging. In addition to being densely populated, Ethiopia is also a mountainous country which makes reaching rural areas extremely difficult. However, each of these six students will bring back their advanced skills to a rural community in Ethiopia, and serve a population that otherwise would not have access to basic health care.

The rapidly growing population highlights particularly the importance of training more nurses and midwives to be skilled birth attendants. This is one of the key competency areas these students are studying through hands-on training in the skills laboratory to learn the process of labor and listen to classroom lectures on the female reproductive system. Eyerus reflects on the community and the role she will play as she practices the skills she’s learned in child and maternal health at nearby health center: “I have an interest to be part of the community fight[ing] to reduce the death of mothers and babies.”

Thank you to Eyerus, and the five other nursing students: Almaz, Hawa, Fatuma, Tsehay, and Haymanot for continuing to share your hard work and learning experiences with us. To our donors, thank you for supporting these students and the thousands of people they will one day serve. Together we can build a healthier world.

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At ALKAN Health Science College nursing students study a curriculum built around the key competencies needed to become effective nurses in their communities, just like students attending nurse training programs in the United States. We asked our students at ALKAN Health Science College about the skills they are learning this year, and which key competency areas they find most interesting. Here’s what they had to say.

Almaz talked about the competency area of implementing basic nursing care—the backbone of all nursing. She is studying how to manage patient safety and comfort and how to help immobile clients with feeding and grooming. She has been mastering these skills by attending class, practicing in the skills laboratory, and collaborating with other health team members. Almaz says it’s important to learn “the knowledge and skills required to contribute to the nursing care of clients in a range of health environments.”

Fatuma highlighted learning about how to administer a wide range of medications. This semester, she is studying pharmacology and how different drugs treat and affect systems in the body. For example, while learning about medications that affect the nervous system, Fatuma studied the drug compounds and effects and then learned how to administer dosage accurately in the skills laboratory.

Hawa was most interested in basic wound care and developing a nursing care plan for her clients. She enjoys practicing in the skills laboratory, particularly skills related to preventing infections.

Tsehay, Eyerus, and Haymanot all pointed to learning how to provide maternal and newborn health care. “For me, there is nothing that gave satisfaction more than providing care and support to the mothers and babies,” reflects Eyerus. “I want to be part of the community that is fighting to reduce the deaths of mothers and babies.” The students have been studying the female reproductive system and fetal development in class. In the skills lab, they practice antenatal care, delivery and postnatal care for both mothers and babies.

To the nursing students at ALKAN, thank you for sharing your interests with us! We enjoy hearing stories coming from Ethiopia about your journey to become nurses. To our donors, we thank you for your continued support and your commitment to championing frontline health workers through this project. We look forward to sharing more stories about our students soon.

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