Apply to Join

Help the Victims of the Earthquake in Nepal

by Concern Worldwide US
Play Video
Help the Victims of the Earthquake in Nepal
Help the Victims of the Earthquake in Nepal
Help the Victims of the Earthquake in Nepal
Help the Victims of the Earthquake in Nepal
Help the Victims of the Earthquake in Nepal
Help the Victims of the Earthquake in Nepal
Help the Victims of the Earthquake in Nepal
Help the Victims of the Earthquake in Nepal
Help the Victims of the Earthquake in Nepal
Help the Victims of the Earthquake in Nepal
Help the Victims of the Earthquake in Nepal
Help the Victims of the Earthquake in Nepal
Help the Victims of the Earthquake in Nepal
Safe Demolition of the Bal Lahari school
Safe Demolition of the Bal Lahari school

Dear Supporter,

I am writing to thank you for your continuing support, which has made a big impact as Concern worked to assist in rebuilding people’s lives in Nepal in the aftermath of the 2015 earthquakes. We responded to the disaster by assisting in repairing schools, providing shelter support, and distributing emergency kits, allowing households to meet their most pressing needs. Concern continues to work within Nepal on longer term reconstruction projects and an emergency preparedness plan.   

In March of 2016, Concern Worldwide implemented the Safe Demolition and Debris Management (DDM) Project in the Sindhuli District of Nepal in partnership with the local non-governmental organization Relief Nepal. The project recently wrapped up, and Concern’s team on the ground in Nepal reports that it has been a great success. The aim of the project was to assist targeted communities in safely demolishing four schools in the Sindhuli District that were heavily damaged during the earthquakes of 2015 and to educate the communities on the proper reuse of the salvaged debris for the construction of new buildings. The project ensured the safety of 437 individuals (425 students and 12 teachers) from accidents and risks posed by the unsafe buildings. This project has also served to build knowledge and skills on demolition and debris management and earthquake resilient construction within the community, while also providing opportunities to earn income. 

Project activities began by training 40 local workers on safe demolition and debris management, including the safe demolition of buildings, identification of hazards, and categorization and storage of debris materials such as wood, stone, and metal roofing sheet, which will be used in subsequent construction projects. The trainees were selected through criteria that aimed to give opportunities for the most disadvantaged people in the affected communities to build skills and receive cash for work. Trainees were then employed in the safe demolition of the four targeted schools in the Sindhuli District. Next, trainings were carried out on earthquake resilient construction techniques. These trainings aimed to enhance the knowledge and skills of existing local masons so that they will be able to build earthquake resilient structures that comply with Nepal’s national government standards and building codes. 

Durga, 39, had been employed as a mason and was engaged in demolishing buildings and reconstructing houses that were destroyed by the earthquakes. Before he and his colleagues became involved in the project, the community had never used safety measures during the demolition of buildings before. After successfully completing the training through Concern’s DDM project, Durga was employed on the safe demolition of the Bal Lahari school in the Sindhuli District, and received payment for his work. Below, Durga discusses his positive experience with the program:

“Wow, what a practice of demolition of buildings with all the safety measures! I was surprised when I heard about the training for demolishing buildings; for me it was an opportunity to learn something new. We were practicing unsafe building demolition works after the catastrophic earthquake and many of us were injured because we did not use safety measures. I now feel safer while demolishing a building. With the income from the project I was able to buy stationery for my daughter, pay medical bills, and buy a drum for our water supply. The knowledge and skills that I have gained will last longer and help me find employment in the future as well.”   

All four of the targeted schools were safely demolished, and all debris generated from the demolition work was stored appropriately on-site, ready for construction. Excavation work was then carried out in order to level the land and create a safe area to be used by the school. The schools will be reconstructed in a subsequent project. The DDM project has greatly improved demolition of damaged buildings, the management of debris, and the separation of materials which will be re-used in reconstruction. In the long run, the increased level of skill within the communities will allow the Sindhuli District to be more resilient to natural disasters, while also increasing the earning potential of its residents. 

This Global Giving project is coming to an end, but we thank you so much for your support and hope that you will continue to support out other projects around the world. We would especially like to direct your attention to our response to the Hunger Crisis in East Africa, which can be found here: https://www.globalgiving.org/projects/combat-hunger-in-east-africa/ 

Durga B.K. in front of the demolition site
Durga B.K. in front of the demolition site
Build Back Better reconstruction training
Build Back Better reconstruction training
Salvaging debris for further reconstruction
Salvaging debris for further reconstruction
Share on Twitter Share on Facebook
Workers demolish compromised walls of a school
Workers demolish compromised walls of a school

Dear Supporter,

I am writing to thank you for your support, which continues to make a difference as we work to help rebuild people’s lives in Nepal in the wake of the 2015 earthquake. Concern initially responded to the disaster by assisting in repairing schools, providing shelter support to those whose homes were destroyed or damaged, and distributing emergency kits that allowed affected households to meet their most pressing needs. Concern’s current focus is assisting the people of Nepal in safely managing demolition and debris of destroyed and damaged structures, an important need that is often overlooked.

While there was a robust humanitarian response in the aftermath of the earthquake, Nepal continues to struggle with problems posed by the collapsed and compromised structures that were left behind. The Sindhuli District was one of the most severely affected districts in Nepal, and 34% of all dwellings in the district were completely destroyed, with many more suffering partial damage. Of the structures that were destroyed in the district, only 1% had been safely demolished as of November 2015. On the ground, this meant that there were many unsafe piles of rubble and weakened structures throughout the countryside that posed acute risks to affected communities.    

Reflecting our mission to invest in long term and sustainable development, Concern recognized that the rubble and unsafe buildings posed an ongoing problem, and with your considerable support we have been assisting communities in the Sindhuli District in safely demolishing buildings that are beyond repair. Debris salvaged through the demolition process is subsequently repurposed and used in the construction of new buildings in the targeted communities.

As part of this effort, since September 2016 Concern has been partnering with a local organization, Relief Nepal, to safely demolish and salvage debris from four schools in the Sindhuli District. The schools will then be rebuilt, a process which will incorporate as much of the salvaged debris as possible. The project will result in an improved learning environment and safer schools for 437 students and teachers in the district. This activity is also helping to build knowledge and skills on demolition and debris management within the community, while providing opportunities to earn income. In January of 2017, 40 selected community members participated in trainings that will allow them to safely carry out the safe demolition and salvaging of debris. Ten participants were then assigned to work on each of the targeted schools. Community members were selected through criteria that aimed to give opportunities for the most disadvantaged and marginalized people in the affected communities to build their skills and receive cash for work. 

After the training was completed, demolition work began in two of the selected schools during the last week of January and buildings at these two schools have now been completely demolished. The work of clearing and sorting the resultant debris continues, including clearing the building foundations in order to prepare for reconstruction. In the remaining two schools, demolition began during the first week of March and will continue throughout the month, following the same steps.

Looking ahead, Concern staff plan to conduct field visits to each of the school sites to review and monitor progress of the demolition and debris management process. Once the work has been satisfactorily completed, the community members will receive cash for their labor. We look forward to providing updates on this exciting work! We are very grateful for your support, without which this vital work would not be possible. 

Workers clear site for a new school building
Workers clear site for a new school building
Community members are trained in safe demolition
Community members are trained in safe demolition
Share on Twitter Share on Facebook

Dear Supporter,

As we close out the work of 2016, I am writing to thank you for your support, which is making a lasting difference to the people of Nepal. We are pleased to provide an update on our work in the provinces of Dhading and Dolakha. 

Since the 2015 earthquake, one of Concern’s key priorities has been on rebuilding schools and ensuring that students can return and pursue their education. Along with structural rebuilding of the school sites, Concern supported the construction of many temporary learning centers, all of which we have previously reported on. Most of the original school sites were not equipped with adequate water and sanitation facilities, resulting in many health and safety hazards for students and teachers. For example, the lack of clean drinking water and hand-washing facilities increased the risks of contracting diarrhea and various water borne diseases. In addition, students were also sometimes forced to resort to open defecation, further risking their health and safety.  

In response to this problem, Concern has implemented services intended to increase access to improved water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) services in schools in the rebuilt school structures and the temporary learning centers. Concern’s long term goal is to ensure that both teachers and students from earthquake affected areas have access to proper drinking water and sanitation facilities. 

Although work on WASH provisions for the schools has been ongoing, a few problems have become apparent and are now being addressed by Concern. First, given the remote location of both of our target districts, Dolakha and Dhading, access to labs that conduct water quality tests is limited. Therefore, Concern is procuring field testing kits for water quality, enabling water testing in the field. The water quality testing kits are of great importance, as the school must monitor the water quality in order to ensure a supply of safe water for students and faculty, especially during the monsoon period.

The water testing kits are affordable, easy to use, and conduct 11 essential tests, including tests for coliform, free residual chlorine, hardness, and color. Through the provision of two training sessions, community members will be trained to use the kits, establishing that they will regularly monitor the condition of the water even after Concern’s role in the project has ended.

A second issue has arisen through a widespread lack of hand-washing in schools. Concern’s sanitation initiatives ultimately aim to reduce the incidence of water borne diseases such as diarrhea, allowing our students to remain healthy and learn to their full potential. This outcome is not possible without the consistent practice of hand washing. In the various field visits undertaken by Concern program staff, it was noted that while Concern had installed hand-washing stations in all targeted schools, the hand-washing stations lacked soap, rendering them ineffective. At the same time, we realized that there is a need to strongly emphasize the importance of hand-washing and hygiene behavior in all the schools, as it is of paramount importance to the health of both the students and the teachers.

In order to promote proper hygiene, both of Concern’s local NGO partners, Action Nepal and Deepjyoti, had previously designed a general hygiene promotion package that focuses on personal hygiene, hand-washing with soap, menstrual hygiene management, and water purification. However, Concern feels that there is a need for a strong campaign focusing exclusively on hand-washing, as it will reinforce the importance of hand-washing at critical moments, the lack of which has been an ongoing problem.

As a part of this campaign, Concern will paint murals focusing on hand-washing with soap in all schools involved in the project, in order to serve as a reminder for students and teachers to always wash their hands with soap and water. This method has been proven to be a successful, popular and cost effective method in Nepal for promoting hand washing.  Additionally, each student club will be given a box of hand soap as motivation to wash their hands, and Concern will also encourage the clubs to work with the School Management Committees to manage soap at the school conclusion of the program. A leaflet explaining the importance of hand-washing, also containing the methodology for properly washing hands, will also be distributed to each school.

Concern is looking forward to working to ensure that Nepalese students affected by the earthquake continue to learn in a healthy and positive environment and are able to achieve their full potential.  Without your support, our work would not be possible. Thank you!  

Share on Twitter Share on Facebook

Dear Supporter,

 

Thank you for supporting Concern Worldwide’s work as we support Nepal in rebuilding the country and its people’s lives following the destruction caused by the earthquake of 2015. Thanks to your support, we have made significant contributions to repairing schools, providing transitional shelter support, distributing emergency kits so that households are able to meet their basic needs, and supporting the people of Nepal in safely managing demolition and debris.

 

Unfortunately, Nepal remains vulnerable to multiple recurrent hazards. Nepal falls within the world’s 20 most multi-hazard prone countries and is ranked 4th, 11th, and 30th in terms of risks posed from climate change, earthquakes, and floods, respectively. Nepal is also extremely vulnerable to landslides, fires, droughts, epidemics, storms, hailstorms, avalanches, and glacial lake outburst floods.

 

To address the country’s vulnerability to these disasters, Concern is developing an emergency preparedness plan to support the timely, efficient, consistent, and coordinated response to potential natural disasters. This plan will help reduce the scale of humanitarian need to the affected population. The specific objectives of the plan are the following:

 

  • To improve the management and coordination of preparedness, response, and recovery arrangements in case of heavy incidents resulting from disasters;
  • To ensure timely resources mobilization for response;
  • To identify existing capacities and gaps in coordination, HR, logistics, and expertise; 
  • To identify trainings and other capacity building activities and support options;
  • To identify and define roles and responsibilities of all staff, partners, and stakeholders involved in emergency response

 

As part of this emergency plan, Concern has already procured 2000 non-food item (NFI) kits in its target districts of Dolakha, Sindhuli, and Dhading, which will increase the resilience of communities in the case of a disaster occurring.

 

When a disaster occurs, many international organizations jump in to provide much needed relief, but the vast majority do not stay to support the country in longer term recovery. With your support, Concern is committed to helping Nepal not only rebuild, but also prepare so that future disasters will not be nearly as destructive as last year’s earthquake. Concern’s emergency preparedness plan is a significant step toward this goal.

 

Thank you! Without you, this work would not be possible.

Share on Twitter Share on Facebook
Demolition training in Kathmandu
Demolition training in Kathmandu

Dear Supporter,

 

Thank you for supporting Concern Worldwide as we work to help rebuild Nepal and its people’s lives after the devastating earthquake of 2015. Thanks to your help, we have been able to make significant contributions to repairing schools, providing transitional shelter support, distributing emergency kits so that households are able to meet their basic needs, and supporting the people of Nepal in safely managing demolition and debris.

The country has struggled with managing both the demolition of destroyed buildings and the amount of debris and rubble left by the earthquake. This problem is highlighted by the fact that little has changed with regards to the condition of many buildings, which, over a year after the earthquake, remain damaged or collapsed. The slow progress in demolition can be attributed to a lack of knowledge on how to demolish safely and a lack of support from most organizations.

 The issue is especially acute in Sindhuli District, where around 34% of the total number of houses were completely destroyed during the earthquake, with many more damaged. In Sindhuli, as in other areas of Nepal badly affected by the earthquake, these damaged buildings are hindering recovery and reconstruction efforts. Despite the large number of households reporting building damage as a result of the earthquake, relatively few have actually started or completed repairs. Very few of the houses have actually been demolished, remaining untouched, unsafe, and full of unused piles of rubble for over a year now. They are taking up valuable space and preventing people from rebuilding their homes on the land.

Concern Worldwide has recognized that this is a problem, and with your generous support, we have begun assisting communities and schools in Sindhuli District in systematically and safely demolishing critically damaged infrastructure. Debris salvaged through the demolition process is being repurposed for the construction of new buildings in the community, which Concern hopes will convince people of the value that debris can have in new construction. This recycling of materials not only avoids waste, but it also is cost-effective because it minimizes the new materials that must be purchased.

Recently, Concern held a five-day training on safe demolition and debris management for Nepali engineers from Concern’s local partner organizations. Taking place in Kathmandu at the end of May 2016, the training included 17 engineers and focused on identifying various hazards on construction sites and ways to mitigate the dangers. The last couple of days of the training gave participants the opportunity to examine real examples of destroyed buildings and identify how they would protect themselves and others from the safety hazards. The participants then learned, step by step, the optimal method for demolishing each building. With input from Engineers Without Borders, the training also covered how to reuse the demolished materials for new construction projects.

With the training completed, we will now begin to conduct field visits to each of the proposed demolition sites to assess the level of damage and determine how to approach the demolition. It will be a busy next few months for the Concern team, but we are eager to see Nepal make major inroads in demolition and debris management, which we believe is an integral component of post-earthquake reconstruction.

Thank you! Without you, this work would not be possible.

Engineers at the demolition training
Engineers at the demolition training
Learning safe demolition practices at the training
Learning safe demolition practices at the training
Share on Twitter Share on Facebook
 

About Project Reports

Project Reports on GlobalGiving are posted directly to globalgiving.org by Project Leaders as they are completed, generally every 3-4 months. To protect the integrity of these documents, GlobalGiving does not alter them; therefore you may find some language or formatting issues.

If you donate to this project or have donated to this project, you will get an e-mail when this project posts a report. You can also subscribe for reports via e-mail without donating.

Get Reports via Email

We'll only email you new reports and updates about this project.

Organization Information

Concern Worldwide US

Location: New York, NY - USA
Website:
Facebook: Facebook Page
Twitter: @concern
Project Leader:
Dara Burke
New York, NY United States

Funded Project!

Combined with other sources of funding, this project raised enough money to fund the outlined activities and is no longer accepting donations.
   

Still want to help?

Support another project run by Concern Worldwide US that needs your help, such as:

Find a Project

Learn more about GlobalGiving

Teenage Science Students
Vetting +
Due Diligence

Snorkeler
Our
Impact

Woman Holding a Gift Card
Give
Gift Cards

Young Girl with a Bicycle
GlobalGiving
Guarantee

Sign up for the GlobalGiving Newsletter

WARNING: Javascript is currently disabled or is not available in your browser. GlobalGiving makes extensive use of Javascript and will not function properly with Javascript disabled. Please enable Javascript and refresh this page.