Sport  Indonesia Project #20152

Blind Sports Equipment for 30 Blind children

by Yayasan Damai Olahraga Bali
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Blind Sports Equipment for 30 Blind children
Blind Sports Equipment for 30 Blind children
Blind Sports Equipment for 30 Blind children
Blind Sports Equipment for 30 Blind children
Blind Sports Equipment for 30 Blind children
Blind Sports Equipment for 30 Blind children
Blind Sports Equipment for 30 Blind children

The project has now expanded to

Blind Judo Team to Bandung, Indonesia. Aug 2017. One step forward for our Blind Judo program. The young blind Judo Team were so excited to participate in the competition. For three of them it was their first trip overseas.
The Competition went well, with the Team taking 1 Silver & 7 Bronze. A brilliant 1st effort. Ms Dayu gave thanks to Yayasan Damai Olahraga Bali, Rodney  for support. Ayuk , Wayan , Made  for training them and the big family of Dria Raba Orphanage, blind judo children, for their self motivation to earn and be best in this competition.
She also gave thanks to Mr Made , for his patience and effort in training her kids, to go from nothing to something, so they can compete in national competitions. Ms Dayu continued that this was a great opportunity for them to compare their skills and abilities against the other Judoteka.
Mr Made said he hoped with more training and their new found motivation that next time they could bring home a gold medal for Bali. He hopes the children and Dria Raba can work together to be the best in the future. We wish them all the best in their aspirations. Congratulations.

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Blind Judo training
Blind Judo training

BSF expands it Blind Sports programs ( Blind Judo,Blind Soccer,Blind Powerlifting,Goalball,Blind Swimming ) to Nusa Tengara Barat .

Working with stakeholders in Central Lombok, BSF is to introduce Blind Soccer and Blind Judo first followed by Blind Swimming and Blind Powerlifting.

Blind Judo in particular can far and above the inherent objectives of all physical and sporting activities, it represents for the visually impaired boys, a means of escape from a sometimes sedentary existence and from the isolation often imposed by a disability. For blind persons and those with low vision, Judo can be instrumental in (re)attaining independence of movement and in developing physical capacities which permit better adaptation to everyday life.

Blindness can cause certain motor problems such as difficulty in attitude integration and body-awareness (since sight is an important factor here); balance problems; problems with motor co-ordination; posture problems; and orientation difficulties.

Apart from the numerous motor and physical qualities which Judo helps to develop in people with normal health, it is perhaps, useful to mention the manner in which these are indispensable for blind people.

Falling: It is essential for a blind person to learn to fall in a suitable manner, since uncertainty of movement, due to blindness, often leads to painful falls. By learning secure positions, blind people can avoid accidents in everyday life.

Balance: This is a fundamental element of Judo and an indispensable factor for the blind. It helps to encourage the visually impaired person's integration in space.

Exercise: Just like sighted people, a blind child must learn to develop his or her physical capacities. He/she will then be able to know and control the body better. Improved control over the motor forces, such as strength, speed and agility, will provide a weapon to combat the consequences of blindness which can otherwise include a sedentary existence.

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Why Blind Sports


Blindness can cause certain motor problems such as difficulty in attitude
integration and body-awareness (since sight is an important factor here); balance
problems; problems with motor co-ordination; posture problems; and orientation
difficulties.
Apart from the numerous motor and physical qualities which Judo helps to
develop in people with normal health, it is perhaps, useful to mention the
manner in which these are indispensable for blind people.
Falling: It is essential for a blind person to learn to fall in a suitable manner,
since uncertainty of movement, due to blindness, often leads to painful falls. By
learning secure positions, blind people can avoid accidents in everyday life.
Balance: This is a fundamental element of Judo and an indispensable factor
for the blind. It helps to encourage the visually impaired person's integration in
space.
Exercise: Just like sighted people, a blind child must learn to develop his or her
physical capacities. He/she will then be able to know and control the body better.
Improved control over the motor forces, such as strength, speed and agility, will
provide a weapon to combat the consequences of blindness which can otherwise
include a sedentary existence.
Kinesthetic sensations: It can be said without exaggeration that blindness does
not constitute a serious problem for a Judoka. In practice, seeing persons do
not look at their opponents during combat; they try to distribute their strength
and adapt their behavior. A blind person is, therefore, not impaired in the
discovery of these physical sensations or in their refinement. It is the perception
of the strength and behavior of the opponent which induces the choice of the
appropriate reaction. Sight does not play a preponderant part in this process.
The psychological se ctor
It is sometimes necessary to reduce the impact of a visual impairment in order
to obtain:
Autonomy: Judo teaches blind people to take the initiative without risk. Blind
people learn to manage without the special assistance of other people. This
encourages self-assurance in everyday life allowing them to take calculated risks.
Blind people quickly learn to find their bearing (space, time) in judo training and
to move around with self-assurance.
Motivation: Judo is attractive because it permits blind people to measure
themselves on an equal basis with seeing people. Blind athletes can participate
officially in the competitions organized by the International Blind Sports
Association and its member countries, as well as all tournaments for the sighted.
They can attain the same ranks and titles as seeing people. All these factors
contribute to self-assurance in their physical capacity, which forms a counterbalance
for their visual impairment.
The s ocial se ctor
It is sometimes necessary to reduce the impact of a visual impairment in order
to obtain:
The battle against isolation: A disability of any description often entails isolation
and a sedentary existence. Membership in a sports organization provides the
opportunity to get out of special schools, to meet other people and measure
against them on an equal basis.BSF Blind Judoteka’s train with seeing
judotekas.
Respect for rules and for other people: Blind people are often suspicious of their
environment and even avoid contact which could he a source of insecurity. This
is why motivating, physical activity can reduce the obstacles, facilitate contact
with other people and promote integration with the world of the seeing.
Sportsmanship: As with sighted students, blind individuals learn through their
participation in sports all the values of good sportsmanship. Judo in particular
has a character building component that stresses the development of a strong
ethical code.
The f uture
Holt continues “our long term plan is that by the Asian ParaGames in 2018
here in Indonesia,the BSF Blind Judo athletes can represent Indonesia.”

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Playing Goalball with West Java
Playing Goalball with West Java

The Blind sports division of Bali Sports Foundation continues to punch above its wieght .In recent months, BSF has hosted the West Java provincial team in Goalball and Blind Judo - see photos attached.

The blind children enjoyed this immensly.And we hope to do it more often.

BSF has been approached to do two more visually impaired sports

Blind Lawn Bowls

Blind Cricket

BSF will investigate the feasability of introducing such sports.

In the meantime BSF focuses on its 5 Blind Sports

1/ Swimming

2/ Judo

3/ Goalball

4/ 5 a side Soccer

5/ Powerlifting

We look forward to hosting more blind sports teams in 2017.

Playing Goalball
Playing Goalball
Players getting ready
Players getting ready
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Goalball at BSF
Goalball at BSF

Far and above the inherent objectives of all physical and sporting activities, blind sports represents for the visually impaired boys and girls, a means of escape from a sometimes sedentary existence and from the isolation often imposed by a disability. For blind persons and those with low vision, sports can be instrumental in (re)attaining independence of movement and in developing physical capacities which permit better adaptation to everyday life.

Bali Blind Games can contribute to these objectives in three sectors: motor, psychological and social.”

Blindness can cause certain motor problems such as difficulty in attitude integration and body-awareness (since sight is an important factor here); balance problems; problems with motor co-ordination; posture problems; and orientation difficulties.

The Blind Games will have the following sports

Judo

Powerlifting

Swimming

Goalball

Soccer

Chess

Ping Pong

The Blind Games will help improve

A disability of any description often entails isolation and a sedentary existence. Membership in a sports organization provides the opportunity to get out of special schools, to meet other people and measure against them on an equal basis.

Respect for rules and for other people: Blind people are often suspicious of their environment and even avoid contact which could he a source of insecurity. This is why motivating, physical activity can reduce the obstacles, facilitate contact with other people and promote integration with the world of the seeing.

 Sportsmanship: As with sighted students, blind individuals learn through their participation in sports all the values of good sportsmanship. Sports  has a character building component that stresses the development of a strong ethical code.

 

Blind Soccer team
Blind Soccer team
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Organization Information

Yayasan Damai Olahraga Bali

Location: Denpasar - Indonesia
Website:
Facebook: Facebook Page
Twitter: @balisports
Project Leader:
Rodney Holt
Denpasar, Indonesia
$1,944 raised of $4,000 goal
 
34 donations
$2,056 to go
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