Treating patients @Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital

by Australia Zoo Wildlife Warriors
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Treating patients @Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital
Treating patients @Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital
Treating patients @Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital
Treating patients @Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital
Treating patients @Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital
Treating patients @Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital
Treating patients @Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital
Treating patients @Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital
Treating patients @Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital
Treating patients @Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital
Treating patients @Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital
Treating patients @Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital
Treating patients @Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital
Treating patients @Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital
Treating patients @Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital
Treating patients @Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital
Treating patients @Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital
Treating patients @Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital
Treating patients @Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital
Treating patients @Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital
Treating patients @Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital
Moon the sooty owl
Moon the sooty owl

Moon the sooty owl released back to her home in the wild after being hit by a car.   

Moon the sooty owl was brought into the Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital by a member of the public after she was hit by a car. An assessment from the veterinary team confirmed that Moon had sustained a fractured leg and pelvis from the collision.

Moon was admitted to the birds ICU where she received close monitoring and around the clock care from our dedicated veterinary team. After a month in care the veterinarian was confident Moon could begin her rehabilitation and she was sent out with one of our wonderful wildlife carers to gain the strength needed to return to the wild.

Moon spent almost three weeks with a carer who specialises in bird rehabilitation where she grew confident enough for release. After one last check up with our veterinary team all of those involved in Moon’s treatment and care were happy to clear her for release back into the wild.

Thanks to you, Moon and many other native Australian animals who become sick, injured or orphaned are given a second chance.

Fact: The Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital is one of the busiest wildlife hospitals in the world. Since opening in 2004 we have treated over 115,000 patients and counting. 

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Winston the red-necked wallaby
Winston the red-necked wallaby

Winston on the road to recovery after losing his mum and undergoing treatment for a gut infection.

Winston the red-necked wallaby had a rough start to life after he and his Mum were hit by a car. Sadly, Winston’s Mum didn’t survive, miraculously Winston sustained no injuries and was taken in by a dedicated wildlife carer. Subsequently Winston was admitted to the Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital with a gut infection that caused complications leading to severe dehydration.

Winston spent a lengthy 17 days in the Nursery ICU receiving fluids, anti-inflammatories and pain relief to aid recovery. Thanks to around the clock care from our dedicated team of vets and nurses, Winston returned back into the hands of his specialised wildlife carer where he is thriving, and will receive all the love and care he needs before he is ready to be released into the wild.

The Australia Zoo Wildlife operates 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, treating sick, injured and orphaned native wildlife. Equipped with a surgical theatre, x-ray room, intensive care units and a pathology lab, the dedicated group of wildlife veterinarians and nurses are able to provide specialised treatment and care to wildlife. Whether it's a kangaroo hit by a car, a koala joey that has lost its mum or a sea turtle that has ingested plastic, the highly experienced team goes above and beyond to treat each patient, hoping that they can return back to the wild upon making a full recovery.

Fact: The Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital has treated over 5000 macropods since opening its doors in 2004, across 17 different macropod species.

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Jim the flatback sea turtle
Jim the flatback sea turtle

Jim the flatback sea turtle released back into the ocean after receiving treatment for microplastic ingestion.

Jim the flatback sea turtle was brought to the Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital for treatment after he had washed up on the shoreline. A further examination from our expert team of vets found the cause of Jim’s unusual behaviour to be microplastic ingestion, this left him very weak and malnourished. Turtles of his age frequently mistake microplastics for food.

The Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital is equipped with a dedicated sea turtle rehabilitation centre, inclusive of ICU pools, a large rehabilitation pool and equipment to transport the turtles between these areas when needed. This facility with the inclusion of support feeding allowed little Jim to quickly regain his strength where he was then cleared for release into a more suitable part of the ocean.

Plastic ingestion can lead to serious problems for sea turtles, it can ignite a condition called ‘floating syndrome’. Floating syndrome in sea turtles is one of the main reasons for being admitted to the Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital. A build up of gas will occur in their intestines due to blockages from the plastic which will make it almost impossible for them to dive beneath the water surface to escape predators, search for food or escape boat strikes.

Fact: Australia is home to six of the seven species of marine turtle species, this includes; green, hawksbill, flatback, leatherback, loggerhead and olive ridley sea turtle.

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Shanoe the koala in the ICU
Shanoe the koala in the ICU

Shanoe the koala on the road to recovery after being attacked by two dogs and suffering from a pulmonary haemorrhage.

Shanoe the koala was attacked by two dogs before he was rescued and rushed to the Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital. Shanoe’s condition was deemed critical upon entry and he was immediately placed under anaesthetic to assess and treat his injuries. An endoscopic examination confirmed that Shanoe was suffering from a pulmonary haemorrhage and multiple punctures as a result of the attack.

After Dr Rosie was able to stabilise Shanoe’s bleeding he was admitted to the ICU to receive specialised around the clock care and treatment for his chest trauma and puncture wounds. Shanoe spent 4 weeks in the ICU and has recently progressed to our specialised koala rehabilitation ward where he will focus on regaining his strength and adjusting to solidarity as a wild koala. Soon Shanoe will be released back into the wild where he will relish at being given a second chance.

From September to March the Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital faces its busiest time of the year which we often refer to as Trauma Season – with the weather heating up we see more wildlife on the move and coming face to face with life-threatening situations much like Shanoe’s.

Fact: The Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital is one of the busiest wildlife hospitals in the world. Since opening in 2004 we have treated over 100,000 patients and counting.

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Thor the beautiful red-legged pademelon is as strong as his name suggests, surviving three days on his own after losing his mum. 

Rangers from the Mary Cairncross Scenic Reserve were called to Thor’s mum’s rescue after she was hit by a car. Upon inspection, they noticed her pouch showed signs of having a joey, but there was none in sight. Suspecting that he had been thrown from the pouch during the collision, they searched the area surrounding the accident and astonishingly managed to find him days later. 

Cold, hungry and terrified, they wrapped him in a warm blanket and rushed him to the Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital. Upon examination it appeared Thor may have had a suspected gastric torsion. Dr Ludo rushed him into surgery, thankfully confirming there weren't any ruptures. 

Thor was transferred to the Nursery ICU with pain relief, anti-inflammatories and fluids to aid recovery. Once his condition stabilised, Thor was transferred to a specialised wildlife carer to provide him with the long-term love and support he needs to be able to return to the wild.

FACT: Pademelons are some of the smaller members of the Macropodidae family. The red-legged pademelon is found across the East Coast of Australia, more commonly the northern regions. 

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Organization Information

Australia Zoo Wildlife Warriors

Location: Beerwah, Queensland - Australia
Website:
Project Leader:
Wildlife Warriors
Beerwah, Queensland Australia
$136,703 raised of $250,000 goal
 
2,247 donations
$113,297 to go
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