Treating patients @Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital

by Wildlife Warriors Ltd
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Treating patients @Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital
Treating patients @Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital
Treating patients @Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital
Treating patients @Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital
Treating patients @Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital
Treating patients @Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital
Treating patients @Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital
Treating patients @Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital
Treating patients @Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital
Treating patients @Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital
Treating patients @Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital
Treating patients @Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital
Treating patients @Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital
Treating patients @Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital
Treating patients @Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital
Treating patients @Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital
Treating patients @Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital
Treating patients @Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital
Treating patients @Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital
Treating patients @Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital
Treating patients @Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital
Dr Amber with Rose the Orphaned Koala Joey
Dr Amber with Rose the Orphaned Koala Joey

September marks the beginning of spring in South-east Queensland and the start of trauma season at the Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital. As temperatures rise so too do the Wildlife Hospital’s patient admissions. Every year from September to January, the number of wildlife coming through the doors almost triples as many species enter breeding season. As wildlife begin to move around in the warmer months, in search of a mate or suitable habitat, domestic pets and busy roads pose a greater threat to wildlife,

Since opening its doors in 2004 in memory of Steve Irwin’s mum Lyn, the hospital has admitted over 70,000 patients. All native Australian wildlife are given the best care at the hospital, where the aim is to treat and release every patient. A brilliant team of vets, nurses, caretakers and volunteers work around the clock to nurse our most vulnerable back to health.

Often during trauma season, we will see gorgeous animals with tiny casts for broken limbs, orphans in humidicribs and recovering koalas in makeshift eucalyptus trees. Seeing firsthand the impact that our environmental footprint leaves on our wildlife and the work the hospital team does will stay in your heart forever.

There are many reasons our native wildlife end up in the Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital and there are plenty of ways we can help reduce the numbers. Whether it be orphaned youngsters, car strikes, pet attacks, effects from litter such as fishing tackle or they’re simply in a strange area, our vets won’t turn away any native in need.

HOW YOU CAN HELP SAVE WILDLIFE:

    Pay careful attention to the sides of the roads, particularly at night and around forestry areas

    Make sure your pets are secured

    Don’t leave behind any rubbish

WHAT TO DO IF YOU FIND AN INJURED ANIMAL:

    If it’s safe and the animal is calm, use a towel and box to rescue it and take it to your nearest wildlife hospital or vet

    If you’re not comfortable rescuing the animal, keep an eye on it and call your local wildlife rescue team for advice or assistance. 

    For more, head to wildlifewarriors.org.au

Rescuer Ritchie with a Platypus
Rescuer Ritchie with a Platypus
The hospital team operating on a wildlife patient
The hospital team operating on a wildlife patient
Dr Rebecca examining a rainbow lorikeet
Dr Rebecca examining a rainbow lorikeet
Vet nurse Jayde with an orphaned kangaroo joey
Vet nurse Jayde with an orphaned kangaroo joey
Rescuer Toby releasing a sea turtle
Rescuer Toby releasing a sea turtle
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Derek the orphaned black-striped wallaby
Derek the orphaned black-striped wallaby

Derek the orphaned Black-striped wallaby joey was found all alone in an abandoned house and had been without food or water for several days.

When Derek arrived at the Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital he was dirty, cold, hungry and looking for his mother who was sadly killed in a car accident only a few days beforehand. Aside from dehydration and an upset stomach, Derek had thankfully escaped any major injuries.

The team at the Wildlife Hospital were quick to wash him clean, warm his tiny body and feed his hungry tummy.

With expert care from the team at the Wildlife Hospital and extra special attention from his specialised wildlife carer, Derek was back to his bright and bouncy self in no time. Derek will spend the next few months with his carer until he is fully-grown and ready for life in the wild.

It is only with your help, orphans like Derek are given a fighting chance to make it to adulthood. Thank you. 

Derek the wallaby joey out and about
Derek the wallaby joey out and about
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Nat the koala and her joey, Mili
Nat the koala and her joey, Mili

Nat the koala, a young mother, was found blindly stumbling around on the ground after she fell three metres from a tree. Poor Nat was very sick, her eyes were red and swollen, and she was having trouble climbing a tree to safety.

A thorough examination at the Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital by Dr Sharon confirmed that Nat was suffering from conjunctivitis, a sign of the life threatening chlamydia disease. Dr Sharon also discovered that Nat was carrying a gorgeous joey in her pouch, a tiny joey named Mili.

Dr Sharon started Nat on a treatment of antibiotics and anti-inflammatory pain relief, to aid her recovery, before transferring mother with joey to the Mammals Intensive Care Unit.

After two months at the Wildlife Hospital, Nat was thankfully cleared of disease and Mili had grown in size, spending more time with her head outside of the pouch. Mother and joey were given the all clear to be released together, to return to their life in the wild.

Thanks to your support, Nat received life-saving treatment at the Wildlife Hospital, ensuring that she can continue to care for her young joey in the wild.

Mili the tiny koala joey
Mili the tiny koala joey
Mili the koala joey saying g'day
Mili the koala joey saying g'day
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Lil Darlin the Brushtail Possum
Lil Darlin the Brushtail Possum

Lil Darlin the Common Brushtail Possum

Lil Darlin the brushtail possum joey was found clinging to her mother’s body after she had been sadly poisoned by rat bait at a local school. A specialised wildlife carer noticed that the orphaned joey was in poor condition and brought her to the Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital.

Poor Lil Darlin was lethargic, dehydrated and her gums were pale when she arrived at the Wildlife Hospital. A thorough examination and x-rays by Dr Danny confirmed that she was suffering anaemia from rat bait toxicity, as a result of drinking her mother’s milk after she had been poisoned.

Thankfully, Dr Danny was able to perform a blood transfusion to replenish the red blood cells in her system, before administering fluids and transferring her to a humidicrib in the nursery, for close observation.

After one week at the Wildlife Hospital, Lil Darlin’s conditioned had improved immensely; the colour had returned to her gums and she was bright and responsive, a good sign that her red blood cell count had returned to normal. Lil Darlin was given the all clear to continue her rehabilitation with a specialised wildlife carer. Once she is fully grown she will be able to return to life in the wild.

Thanks to your suypport, orphans like Lil Darlin are given a fighting chance to make it to adulthood.    

Lil Darlin
Lil Darlin
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Braveheart the Koala
Braveheart the Koala

Braveheart the Koala

Four months ago Braveheart the koala was found with a busted leg on the side of the road. Poor Braveheart was hit by a car after attempting to cross the road, in search a new girlfriend. Braveheart was rescued by a local rescue group and transported to the Currumbin Wildlife Hospital, where they confirmed he had suffered serious trauma injuries; a fractured leg and bruising to his lungs.

Thankfully, orthopaedic surgeons from Veterinary Specialist Services at Carrara performed surgery to
stabilise Braveheart's broken leg, before applying a bandage and administering pain relief.

After one week in care, Braveheart was transferred to the Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital, to continue his recovery in a long term rehabilitation facility.

After three months in the koala rehabilitation wards, rebuilding his strength and eating plenty of fresh eucalyptus leaf, Braveheart was ready for his pre-release check-up. A thorough examination and x-rays by Dr Amber confirmed that Braveheart’s leg had completely healed and that he was ready to be released back into the wild.

Thanks to your generous support, Braveheart and many other koalas are given a second chance at life in the wild.

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Wildlife Warriors Ltd

Location: Beerwah, Queensland - Australia
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Project Leader:
Wildlife Warriors
Beerwah, Queensland Australia
$137,715 raised of $250,000 goal
 
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