Wildlife Trust of India

Conserve nature, especially endangered species and threatened habitats, in partnership with communities and governments.
Mar 10, 2016

In eight months MVS Bandipur has attended 35 cases of Wildlife Displacement

MVS-Bandipur Vet attending to spotted -deer
MVS-Bandipur Vet attending to spotted -deer

Since inception on 9th June'15 till December 2015, the MVS-Bandipur unit has attended to 35 cases of wildlife displacements (including tigers, leopards, elephants), 34 indirect and 10 direct interventions during human-large carnivore conflict, 8 cases of captive elephants (including the admitted orphaned calf), 68 cases of domestic animals (cattle, sheep and dogs) and conducted 22 necropsies of wildlife that died (in situ and ex situ). In addition to this, the team also visited several villages and interacted with locals while sensitizing them towards conservation of all species (with emphasis on mitigating human-large carnivore conflict).

Following are the activities done by the MVS unit in the month of February 2016:

A.Wildlife rescue, rehabilitation and conflict mitigation

 

The MVS Unit was called out to the Mettikuppe Range of Nagarhole, to an area bordering the Bandipur Tiger Reserve to rescue and rehabilitate a very large Short Toed Snake Eagle. The eagle had been found wandering in a village and had been brought back and dumped at the Department office. The eagle was severely dehydrated and had a fractured left wing. The wing was splinted and the bird treated. After a few days of care, the bird was released back into the Mettikuppe Range where he flew for several hundred meters unassisted. He was sighted several times over the next week by Forest Department Watchers who informed the team that he had successfully managed to kill several lizards and a rodent.

 

The MVS Veterinarian was handed an orphaned mottled wood owl, whose mother had reportedly been killed by a snake. The baby owl was hand reared by the MVS Veterinarian and is due for release in March.

The Rusty Spotted Cat is due for release in March.

One crow was found by a farmer on a plot adjacent to the MVS Field Station. It had been electrocuted on a solar fence. After a month of treatment, the crow escaped and now lives near the Field Station Premises.

On the 20th of February, the MVS Unit attended to a case in which a large Chital Doe was found impaled on fence spikes outside a popular resort on the perimeter of the park. The deer was lifted off the spikes and brought to the RFO Office in G.S. Betta by the resort staff. The deer was sedated and treated. After it stabilized, the deer was taken to the Mysore Zoo for intensive care. However due to the massive amounts of stress in went through and an associated spinal injury due to its movement while impaled, the deer passed away a week later.

B.Disease investigation

Several more cases of suspected Foot and mouth disease were observed around Bandipur. In one case, an entire drove of wild boars with around 40 individuals was reported showing signs of the disease. The incident was reported to the Forest Department and Animal Husbandry Department. In the future, both Departments will work closely together alongside the MVS team to ensure strict vaccination protocols and a comprehensive vaccination programme.

C.Captive animal care

 

1)Domestic animals: Cattle continued to be lifted in the Kundkere Range, with 6 cows and 1 bullock being killed and eaten by a tiger. The MVS Veterinarian treated several cattle and sheep for foot and mouth disease around the Kundkere Range and Hediyala Ranges. A dog was dumped at the Bandipur Police Check post by a private car with 2 occupants on its way to Kerala. The dog had several maggot wounds and was very thin. He also showed signs of severe prior abuse. We caught him, sedated him, and then treated his wounds. The dog was adopted on 3/3/15. The MVS Veterinarian treated a severe ear infection in a dog in Mangala Village; another dog with a chronic case of blindness due to a persistent infection was treated. The blind dog has since regained its sight in one eye. Treated a chronic case of hypopyon and eye infection in a dog. Dog has since regained its sight.

2) Captive elephants: Continued the treatment of the injured elephant calves who have now completely recovered from their wounds. The MVS Veterinarian was called to BRT by the CF in charge to treat Gajendra, a large captive tusker in BRT who had a large abscess on his right flank. The abscess has since healed after multiple applications of a topical cream compounded specifically for his wound.

 

D.Awareness and training programs

       Assisted in conducting a workshop on DTR software for the forest officials in Nagarhole and in the preparation of slogans and signboards that are to be placed around Nagarhole Tourist areas.

 

E.  Plan for next month

The MVS Team will continue to attend to wild animal and livestock cases in and around the Bandipur Tiger Reserve and carry out awareness campaigns in areas of high human-animal conflict.

Mar 10, 2016

Wildlife Crime Prevention Training at Kanha Tiger Reserve India

WTI
WTI's Jose Louies during the training

Wildlife Trust of India (WTI) team along with  Madhya Pradesh Forest Department organised Wildlife Crime Prevention training at Kanha Tiger Reserve  from January 11 to 13' 2016-  had participation of 40 forest staff from Balaghat and Jabalpur forest circles. 

Rajendra Singh Chauhan, a Range Officer with the South Balaghat Division in Madhya Pradesh, has been actively working with the MP Forest Department team in busting the nexus of traders and poachers who deal in pangolin scales. In November 2014, their team apprehended traders with three kilograms of pangolin scales and cash. They also arrested suspects from six different states and busted a crucial network. The investigation is ongoing and the team is pursuing 12 individuals involved in the trade of pangolin scales. Till this point, everything transpired as planned but Chauhan and his team faced a legal hassle. They were not sure whether they had to issue a transit remand or protection warrant. Unaware of other legal procedures, the team was losing hope.


“While handling such cases, one of the major drawbacks is that the Forest Department personnel are not aware of court proceedings and other details which are crucial for getting these criminals behind bars. We sometimes fail to bring the guilty to the book because of the lack of knowledge of certain sections and sub sections of the Wildlife Protection Act, 1972. We don’t know the legal procedures and despite all the hard work, we often fail in getting the right sentence for these criminals,” he said.

During the course of training, the participants were informed about various sections and sub-sections of Wild Life (Protection) Act, 1972; wildlife crimes and modus operandi of poachers; criminal procedure code; crime scene investigation; case presentation by investigation team in the court room; wildlife crime investigation and documentation; and complaint filing at court. 

Those who represented WTI included Jose Louies, Head, Enforcement; Advocate YK Soni; Dr RP Mishra, Regional Head; and Achintya Tripathi. Interactive sessions during the course of the training saw participants enthusiastically interacting with the team and asking questions whenever in doubt. Chauhan was the one who was most active during the three day long training programme.

He added, “Such trainings help us understand that what legal procedures should be used in court to get these poachers and others the maximum sentence. When we produce these criminals in court we usually can’t answer the judges and the lawyers in legal terms. Through these trainings, we get to know about all the sections and sub-sections of Wild Life (Protection) Act, 1972, and this will help us in not repeating mistakes. This eliminates any doubts that we have about legal proceedings,” he added. He went on to say that sometimes the forest staff takes a backseat because they think that they could end up becoming the guilty party. “These trainings benefit us and empower us.” 

His views were echoed by others who believed that trainings like these would go a long way in empowering the forest staff that is unaware of their powers. The training module also had a practical session on crime scene investigation wherein everyone participated with great enthusiasm. 

The fresher training was followed by two day refresher training which saw participation of 36 frontline forest staff. The training was held from January 15 to 16, 2016. 

JS Chauhan, Field Director, Kanha Tiger Reserve, while addressing the participants said, “You need to practice this on a day to day basis otherwise it will be of no use. The whole idea of this training is to help you in investigation, protection and if needed conviction. And in future the effects of this training should reflect in that. Trainings keep happening but this training has different significance. Your way of working will get refined by this training and I hope that everyone will learn something new from here and implement it in their day to day activities.”

In a bid to equip and strengthen the frontline forest staff of the country, WTI has been conducting Wildlife Crime Prevention Training Programme under the VRP since 2001. VRP follows a multi-pronged strategy with four thrust areas abbreviated as TEAM: Training, Equipping, Awareness and Morale Boosting, to broadly facilitate capacity building and strengthen spirits of personnel in tough field circumstances. “Training in Madhya Pradesh for frontline field staff of territorial and Forest Development Corporation divisions along with the staff posted in National Parks and Wildlife Sanctuaries is just another step in making our forests safer for wildlife," said Suresh Chand, Senior Advisor, VRP, WTI. 

Dec 29, 2015

Sensitising people to prevent kite string injuries

Pledges were signed during street plays
Pledges were signed during street plays

The festival of Makar Sankranti is one of the few Hindu festivals that falls on the same day every year according to the Gregorian calendar.It signifies the end of the winters and the heralding of spring.Widely celebrated around India, the rituals followed on this include exchanging of sweets made from sesame and jaggery and the flying of kites The gods who have slumbered for six months are have awakened and the kites are flown to the portals of heaven that are now open. 

This idyllic festival can have lethal connotations for birds, however as kite strings (also called manjha)  are often heavily coated with powdered glass to give the kite fliers an advantage in their fiercely fought battles. The strings can be so sharp that people flying kites often bandage their hands to prevent injuries. Another threat that has recently been added is the introduction of "Chinese manjha" which is made from nylon. The nylon strings are popular as they are fairly cheap and do not degrade. Hence they remain a threat to birds long after the festivities have ended.

The kite flying festivities are enjoyed with vigour in the city of Jaipur with numerous kites dotting the skies for days after.  Last year the Jaipur Administration banned the use of Chinese manjha and the flying of kites during the hours that birds are most active. i. e. between 6 to 8 am and 5 to 7pm.

 However, it is important that these bans are enforced and adhered to by the public. In order to do this, the project team has started a campaign to reach out to the people of Jaipur to senstize them towards the plight of birds. A special poster for the campaign, designed by the team, was issued by the District Collecter. This poster has already been put up in various schools, colleges and other institutions.

Awareness camps have been set up in two schools so far where the team spoke to the students. Students signed and recited the following pledge:

1). I will not fly kites from 6.00-8.00AM & 5.00-7.00PM .
2). I will not buy Chinese manjha.
3). I will dispose of leftover manjha in waste bins only. 

Students also pledged to remove manjha from at least five trees near their houses.

The campaign team has also set up two bird treatment camps for injured birds in prominent areas of the city.

Street plays were held at popular tourist spots like the Jantar Mantar, the City Palace and the Govind Dev Ji Temple. The plays were performed at times when the footfall in these areas is the highest thereby reaching out to a large number of people. Over 400 people signed the pledge during these plays. 

As the festival draws nearer, the campaign is intensifying its activties with peace rallies and candle light vigils. more sensitisation programs have also been initiated around the city.

Street plays were held at popular places
Street plays were held at popular places
The poster being issued by the district collector
The poster being issued by the district collector

Links:

 
   

donate now:

An anonymous donor will match all new monthly recurring donations, but only if 75% of donors upgrade to a recurring donation today.
Terms and conditions apply.
Make a monthly recurring donation on your credit card. You can cancel at any time.
Make a donation in honor or memory of:
What kind of card would you like to send?
How much would you like to donate?
  • $12
    (USD)
    give
  • $20
    (USD)
    give
  • $50
    (USD)
    give
  • $80
    (USD)
    give
  • $100
    (USD)
    give
  • $12
    each month

    (USD)
    give
  • $20
    each month

    (USD)
    give
  • $50
    each month

    (USD)
    give
  • $80
    each month

    (USD)
    give
  • $100
    each month

    (USD)
    give
  • $
    give
gift Make this donation a gift, in honor of, or in memory of someone?
WARNING: Javascript is currently disabled or is not available in your browser. GlobalGiving makes extensive use of Javascript and will not function properly with Javascript disabled. Please enable Javascript and refresh this page.