Oct 29, 2020

Communication to avoid human-elephant conflict

House damaged by elephants
House damaged by elephants

Dear Patron,

Today's updates for the project are from the tea gardens of Chenga and Panighatta regions in the Northern West Bengal. 

Around the tea gardens in the above mentioned regions, the human-elephant conflict instances were on the rise - the elephants were reportedly damaging houses and other infrastructure. Through WTI's intervention, our Rapid Action Project (RAP) proponent from the region, Mr Avijan Saha, identified certain factors which were responsible for this unrest.     

There were several unused or non-functional plantations near human settlements in which the unkempt tea bushes and invasive weeds had grown quite dense. This encouraged the elephant herds to come and take shelter within these plantations and near the human settlements resulting in frequent conflict instances. 

Mr. Saha engaged a small conservation group comprising science students and community youth as well as the gram panchayat in an initiative to de-weed and clear the bushes. 

Further, the movement of elephants through tea-bushes is mostly silent and does not alert the local communities about elephant presence. To address this, the team helped in installing bamboo fences around the settlements in the landscape. The bamboo barricade would serve as an early warning system if the elephants do try venturing in.

These interventions have significantly brought down conflict in the last couple of months as the elephants continue to move across and do not halt near the settlements any longer. Mr. Saha and his team continue to sensitise these communities.

That's all for today's updates. We would like to take this opportunity to thank you for your generous support and for believing in our project. Thank you for being a part of our team as we look forward to continue the good work. 

Regards

Team WTI  

Overgrowth of tea bushes and weeds
Overgrowth of tea bushes and weeds
Setting up of bamboo baricades
Setting up of bamboo baricades
Vegetation cleared by the Gram Panchayat and team
Vegetation cleared by the Gram Panchayat and team
Sep 8, 2020

Help us keep wildlife forever wild

“Hope is important because it can make the present moment less difficult to bear. If we believe that tomorrow will be better, we can bear a hardship today.”

- Thich Nhat Hanh

Dear patron,

Today’s updates are on hope and resilience – how they keep us going in the face of adversity.

The world is battling the COVID 19 pandemic and we are all in this together. We are grateful that your support for our work never ceased despite the difficult times. And neither did our teams stop working.

The pandemic crippled the world and caught us all off guard. Our stakeholders, especially the local communities living around protected areas have been severely affected. A disrupted supply chain worsened by their remote habitation resulted in poor access to even basic necessities like food grains and sanitization facilities.

Wildlife Trust of India, through its Rapid Action Projects (and other long-term projects), has been working tirelessly, to support these communities. In this update, we elaborate and present to you one such initiative undertaken in ‘Jigaon’ village through a Rapid Action Project (RAP)*.

‘Jigaon’ is a small village located in the periphery of the Eagle-nest Wildlife Sanctuary in Arunachal Pradesh. It comprises around 650 inhabitants, including natives (mostly farmers), and migrants from other states (daily wagers, carpenters and masons).

On 21st of June, a Jigaon-based NGO, ‘Zgang Depga’, distributed ration kits- rice, pulses, oil and salt - to 105 households in Jigaon village and adjacent hamlets, with WTI’s support and sponsorship. To prevent social gatherings, the village elders, upon consultation, suggested door-to-door distribution of the ration to the households who were in need of help. The volunteers distributed the ration kits to 105 households covering Lingdochhok, Yokmu, Bichirekngu and Jigaon villages. Six households, from the adjacent Okkhorbari hamlet, who needed ration kits were also supported.

Wildlife Trust of India has been working with these communities and rangers for over two decades. While they are the frontrunners of conservation, we continue to stand by them as they help us keep wildlife #Foreverwild.

We are hopeful that things will be better soon. Till then, stay safe!

Warm regards,

Team WTI

Jul 17, 2020

Equipping Forest Guards to protect Wildlife

Crocodile rescue kit training
Crocodile rescue kit training

Dear Patron,

Forests give life and protecting these lands are the ‘unsung’ front-line soldiers - the forest guards. These men and women are critical for conservation and are determined to protect wildlife. However, there has often been a dearth of facilities- equipment, medical care, safety systems – in which they somehow operate. To ensure suitable working conditions for these ‘Guardians of the Wild’, Wildlife Trust of India (WTI) has been supplementing their requirements for nearly two decades.

This quarter’s updates are from Kota, a city in the state of Rajasthan. The Deputy Conservator of Forests (Wildlife) from the region raised concern about the number of crocodile and snake rescue calls received by the Forest Department in the reporting period. The area from where most rescues have been reported lies between 4 populated districts- Chittorgarh, Baran, Bhundi and Kota. On an average, the department has been receiving 60 cases of snake rescue and 10 cases of crocodile rescue every year. In order to carry out these snake and crocodile rescue operations, he mentioned a requirement for specialised rescue ‘kits’.

To equip the frontline staff in rescue operations, WTI supported the department with 8 snake rescue kits and 4 crocodile rescue kits. So far, 33 snake rescues and 5 crocodile rescues have been conducted with the kits provided. The team is all geared up for the upcoming monsoons as well, when the overflowing rivers result into a spike in such rescue calls.

We at WTI thank you for your continued support, which is crucial to keep our work going on the ground. We will keep sending more such updates on similar initiatives to you. This then, stay safe and take care!

Warm regards,

Team WTI 

 
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