Feb 17, 2021

Lantern Distribution in Tambacouroto, Senegal

Lantern distribution in Tambacouroto
Lantern distribution in Tambacouroto

Lantern distribution in Tambacouroto

             As part of its support to communities, Solar Empowerment Initiative has, once again through the Londoo Looloo association, distributed solar lanterns to a population who does not have access to electricity despite being in the 21st century. .

            This time, the choice fell on a small village called Tambacouroto. It is located in the town of Diendé about ten kilometers from the regional capital Sédhiou.

            This village does not have any basic infrastructure, that is to say they are without drinking water, health clinics and schools. Children travel more than a kilometer to reach school. These lanterns are an opportunity for them to improve their learning.

            The village is populated by a hundred inhabitants made up of farmers. These people welcomed this gift with great joy, which will benefit them. The candle and the hurricane lamp will be bad memories.

            The village chief, the women leaders and the youth leaders took the floor to thank their generous donor namely Solar Empowerment Initiative and Londoo Looloo who are always alongside the communities for their well-being.

            This donation resonated in the area, as whole villages expressed the wish to benefit from solar lanterns.

            We would once again like to thank the board of directors of the Solar Empowerment Initiative, which continues to support us for the harmonious development of our people.

          We attach to this report the photos of the distribution of the lanterns.

School boy receiving solar light.
School boy receiving solar light.
School boy receiving solar light.
School boy receiving solar light.
Oct 23, 2020

Changing Lives in Senegal and Myanmar

Nursing mother
Nursing mother

Since our last report, we were able to send over 1000 solar systems and lanterns to Myanmar. These include 1008 of our small, efficient, and long-lasting SF-1S lantern, and ten of a larger model with three very bright lights and two USB ports for charging cell phones. This model, the SF-906 is very suitable for classrooms and small rural health clinics. The lights were distributed by our partner in Myanmar, World Vision Myanmar. This maximizes our efficiency by eliminating the expenses involved with international travel. Moreover, WVM was able to obtain permission from the government to bring these lights in tax free.

Also, our partner in Senegal, CorpsAfrica, was able, in spite of the corona virus, to distribute two cases (96 lanterns) in the village of Wallang Kingui in the remote Kédougou Region. The distribution priority was

• Students in exam classes
• Pregnant women
• Nursing mothers

These beneficiaries would otherwise have to endure the darkness or rely on expensive candles or kerosene, both of which are fire hazards. Additionally, kerosene lanterns emit noxious fumes, which can be injurious to a baby's health.

Thanks to the generosity of our donors, we were able to pay for an additional shipment of solar lights to Myanmar. These are being held by the manufacturer pending a determination by the Myanmar government that these lanterns can again be brought tax free into the country.

Grateful mother
Grateful mother
Studying for Exams
Studying for Exams
Zin Wai Phyo can now study at night - Myanmar
Zin Wai Phyo can now study at night - Myanmar
Swe's dream is to be a flight attendant.
Swe's dream is to be a flight attendant.

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Attachments:
Jun 24, 2020

Succeeding in Tough Times

School girl with solar lantern
School girl with solar lantern

Dear Friends,

This has been a difficult year. Our shipment of 2300 lanterns from our supplier was delayed for months. It finally was delivered to the Salvation Army warehouse in April. Since then, we have distributed approximately 800 solar lanterns. Of these, about 400 have gone to the homeless, primarily in the Baltimore/Washington area. That was the easy part. Much harder now because of the virus is sending the lanterns overseas. Nevertheless, we have succeeded in sending almost 300 lanterns to Senegal, in addition to the 1000 solar lanterns that were shipped directly from the manufacture to World Vision in Myanmar. That is almost 1300 lanterns that will make their way to school children. In remote villages.

But there is more. While we were waiting for our shipment from overseas, we managed to locate a few small stocks of solar lanterns that were already in warehouses here in the US. We purchased about 150 lanterns of assorted models. Of these, we managed to deliver 90 to a local charity in Sedhiou, in the the Casamance region of Senegal. And these actually arrived in Sedhiou last week after following a very torturous route. We have a contact in Glendale, MD, whose family runs a shop in Dakar. He ships a full-sized shipping container regularly from the US to his shop, which is run by his mother. He does not charge us, which makes this a good deal for us. But it is slow, adding another couple months to the process. We dropped off four cases of lanterns (48 lanterns per case) to him two weeks ago. Two cases will go to Sedhiou and two will be distributed by CorpsAfrica, whose director in Senegal is the uncle of our contact in Glendale. Family is everything.

Thank you for your continued support. Be assured, we make the most out of every donation you make.

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